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Full-Text Articles in Education

Don’T Worry, Be Gappy! On The Unproblematic Gappiness Of Alleged Fallacies, Fabio Paglieri May 2016

Don’T Worry, Be Gappy! On The Unproblematic Gappiness Of Alleged Fallacies, Fabio Paglieri

OSSA Conference Archive

The history of fallacy theory is long, distinguished and, admittedly, checkered. I offer a bird eye view on it, with the aim of contrasting the standard conception of fallacies as attractive and universal errors that are hard to eradicate (section 1) with the contemporary preoccupation with “non-fallacious fallacies”, that is, arguments that fit the bill of one of the traditional fallacies but are actually respectable enough to be used in appropriate contexts (section 2). Godden and Zenker have recently argued that reinterpreting alleged fallacies as non-fallacious arguments requires supplementing the textual material with something else, e.g. probability distributions, pragmatic ...


Commentary On Daniel Cohen And Katharina Stevens' "Virtuous Vices: On Objectivity And Bias In Argumentation", Tone Kvernbekk May 2016

Commentary On Daniel Cohen And Katharina Stevens' "Virtuous Vices: On Objectivity And Bias In Argumentation", Tone Kvernbekk

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Comparing Two Models Of Evidence, Tone Kvernbekk May 2016

Comparing Two Models Of Evidence, Tone Kvernbekk

OSSA Conference Archive

The context for this paper is evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP is about production of desirable change. The evidence should come from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). To make sense of RCT evidence it must be placed in an argument structure. I compare two different models, Toulmin and Cartwright, and investigate whether the two models can be merged into one. I shall argue that such merging is not feasible.


Emotional Legal Arguments And A Broken Leg, Rubens Damasceno-Morais May 2016

Emotional Legal Arguments And A Broken Leg, Rubens Damasceno-Morais

OSSA Conference Archive

We intend to examine ways that emotions may be intertwined within argumentative legal discourses. From the transcript of a brief trial in a Court of Appeal in Brazil we have the opportunity to observe how the emotional and rational reasoning live together in a deliberation among magistrates. “The leg broken case” allow us to examine how judges define the value of compensation to be paid in cases of moral damage. We show that not only technical arguments are the compounds of one decision; subjectivity is also important in that legal context. We would yet confirm what jurists and philosophers of ...


Exploring Argumentation, Objectivity, And Bias: The Case Of Mathematical Infinity, Ami Mamolo May 2016

Exploring Argumentation, Objectivity, And Bias: The Case Of Mathematical Infinity, Ami Mamolo

OSSA Conference Archive

This paper presents an overview of several years of my research into individuals’ reasoning, argumentation, and bias when addressing problems, scenarios, and symbols related to mathematical infinity. There is a long history of debate around what constitutes “objective truth” in the realm of mathematical infinity, dating back to ancient Greece (e.g., Dubinsky et al., 2005). Modes of argumentation, hindrances, and intuitions have been largely consistent over the years and across levels of expertise (e.g., Brown et al., 2010; Fischbein et al., 1979, Tsamir, 1999). This presentation examines the interrelated complexities of notions of objectivity, bias, and argumentation as ...


Commentary On Uses Of Arguments From Definition In Children’S Argumentation, Daniel Fasko Jr May 2016

Commentary On Uses Of Arguments From Definition In Children’S Argumentation, Daniel Fasko Jr

OSSA Conference Archive

This paper presents an analysis of the reasoning of two 5-year old children’s use of argument from definition. The author uses the Argumentum Model of Topics (AMT; Rigotti & Greco-Morasso, 2009) to accomplish this task. A brief history of the “locus of definition” is presented, as well as a description of how and where the data were collected. More specifically, the data come from a study of students conducted for over 30 years in Switzerland. Two examples are discussed where an adult experimenter examined these children’s responses to conservation of liquid and number tasks. The two examples of children ...