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Full-Text Articles in Education

Learning At The Bottom Of The Pyramid: Constraints, Comparability And Policy In Developing Countries, Daniel A. Wagner, Nathan M. Castillo Dec 2014

Learning At The Bottom Of The Pyramid: Constraints, Comparability And Policy In Developing Countries, Daniel A. Wagner, Nathan M. Castillo

Journal Articles (Literacy.org)

United Nations development goals have consistently placed a high priority on the quality of education—and of learning. This has led to substantive increases in international development assistance to education, and also to broader attention, worldwide, to the importance of children’s learning. Yet, such goals are mainly normative: they tend to be averages across nations, with relatively limited attention to variations within countries. This review provides an analysis of the scientific tensions in understanding learning among poor and marginalized populations: those at the bottom of the pyramid (BOP). While international agencies such as UNESCO and OECD often invoke these ...


Mobiles For Literacy In Developing Countries: An Effectiveness Framework, Daniel A. Wagner, Nathan M. Castillo, Katie M. Murphy, Molly Crofton, Fatima T. Zahra Mar 2014

Mobiles For Literacy In Developing Countries: An Effectiveness Framework, Daniel A. Wagner, Nathan M. Castillo, Katie M. Murphy, Molly Crofton, Fatima T. Zahra

Journal Articles (Literacy.org)

In recent years, the advent of low-cost digital and mobile devices has led to a strong expansion of social interventions, including those that try to improve student learning and literacy outcomes. Many of these are focused on improving reading in low-income countries, and particularly among the most disadvantaged. Some of these early efforts have been called successful, but little credible evidence exists for those claims. Drawing on a robust sample of projects in the domain of mobiles for literacy, this article introduces a design solution framework that combines intervention purposes with devices, end users, and local contexts. In combination with ...


Gold Standard? The Use Of Randomized Controlled Trials For International Educational Policy. Review Of Abhijit V. Bannerjee And Esther Duflo, Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking Of The Way To Fight Global Poverty; Barbara Bruns, Deon Filmer, And Harry A. Patrinos, Making Schools Work: New Evidence On Accountability Reforms; Dean Karlan And Jacob Appel, More Than Good Intentions: How A New Economics Is Helping To Solve Global Poverty, Nathan M. Castillo, Daniel A. Wagner Feb 2014

Gold Standard? The Use Of Randomized Controlled Trials For International Educational Policy. Review Of Abhijit V. Bannerjee And Esther Duflo, Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking Of The Way To Fight Global Poverty; Barbara Bruns, Deon Filmer, And Harry A. Patrinos, Making Schools Work: New Evidence On Accountability Reforms; Dean Karlan And Jacob Appel, More Than Good Intentions: How A New Economics Is Helping To Solve Global Poverty, Nathan M. Castillo, Daniel A. Wagner

Journal Articles (Literacy.org)

Edward Miguel and Michael Kremer Pioneered a new kind of development research in their 2004 study of a school deworming program in Kenya. Their experimental design incorporated the random assignment of primary school students to either a treatment or a control group for receiving medicine to eliminate intestinal parasites. Findings revealed significant benefits to the treatment group in not only improved health but also lowered school absences (Miguel and Kremer 2004). One policy consequence was an increased awareness for more evidence-based decision making under the banner of accountability reform in international development.1 The driving focus for such reform is ...