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Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Education

Using Teachliveᵀᴹ To Improve Pre-Service Special Education Teacher Practices, April N. Enicks Dec 2012

Using Teachliveᵀᴹ To Improve Pre-Service Special Education Teacher Practices, April N. Enicks

Dissertations

Currently, there is a body of research available that clearly specifies effective teaching behaviors and quality indicators of a given behavior (Rosenshine, 2012; Danielson, 2007; Stronge, 2007; Rosenshine, 1983; Brophy, 1979). Research is lacking in defining practices that develop effective teaching behaviors in pre-service teachers. The primary objective of this study was to determine the effects of various forms of instructional modes, settings, and experiences on students’ ability to demonstrate desired effective teaching behaviors. The secondary objective of this study was to determine if on-going self-reflection coupled with various forms of feedback supported students in becoming more effective reflective practitioners ...


Around The World In 180 Days, Laura Rogers Oct 2012

Around The World In 180 Days, Laura Rogers

Honors Theses

For years, multicultural curriculum has been accepted as "normal curriculum" sprinkled with various holidays celebrated by non-white cultures and the occasional multicultural book. As a result, many students graduate from high school and college ignorant of the various cultures present in our communities, states, our country, and our world. Myself, and others such as Paulo Friere (educator and author of Pedagogy of the Oppressed) and Susan Piazza (associate professor of literacy studies at Western Michigan University), believe that multicultural curriculum should be much more. For teachers to create a thoughtful, reflective, substantive multicultural curriculum they must intentionally create what Susan ...


Building Conceptual Understanding Through Vocabulary Instruction, William H. Rupley, William Dee Nichols, Maryann Mraz, Timothy R. Blair Jul 2012

Building Conceptual Understanding Through Vocabulary Instruction, William H. Rupley, William Dee Nichols, Maryann Mraz, Timothy R. Blair

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

Instructional design is an integral part of a balanced approach to teaching vocabulary instruction. This article presents several instructional procedures using research-based vocabulary strategies and explains how to design and adapt those strategies in order to reach desired learning outcomes. Emphasis is placed on research-based principles that guide effective vocabulary instruction and on the importance of incorporating vocabulary instruction into all phases of the reading lesson framework--before, during, and after reading (Blair, Rupley, & Nichols 2007; Vacca, Vacca, & Mraz 2011). Vocabulary instruction should encourage students to make associations and accommodations to their experiences and provide them with varied opportunities to practice, apply, and discuss their word knowledge in meaningful contexts (Beck & McKeown, 2002; Rupley & Nichols, 2005). The ultimate goal of teaching vocabulary is for the students to expand, refine, and add to their existing conceptual knowledge and enhance their comprehension and understanding of what they read (Baumann, Font, Edwards, & Boland , 2005; Stahl & Fairbanks, 1986). This article seeks to provide educators with both a theoretical framework and practical classroom instructional suggestions for doing so.


Great Books For Late Summer Reading, Terrell A. Young, Barbara A. Ward Jul 2012

Great Books For Late Summer Reading, Terrell A. Young, Barbara A. Ward

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

For decades now, reading experts have expressed concern that the competence gained by struggling readers during the academic year is lost during the summer months. While academic enrichment and remediation programs can reduce that loss, one of the best practices to build better readers is by having them read during breaks from school. At least one study clearly supports this suggestion. In his study of 1,600 elementary students in the mid-Atlantic area, researcher James Kim (2009) found that regardless of previous achievement level or race or socioeconomic level, children who read more books performed better on reading comprehension tests ...


The Professional Development Practices Of Two Reading First Coaches, Charlotte A. Mundy, Dorene D. Ross, Melinda M. Leko Jul 2012

The Professional Development Practices Of Two Reading First Coaches, Charlotte A. Mundy, Dorene D. Ross, Melinda M. Leko

Reading Horizons: A Journal of Literacy and Language Arts

To establish job-embedded, ongoing professional development recent policies and initiatives required that districts appoint school-based coaches. The Reading First Initiative, for example, created an immediate need for coaches without a clear definition of coaches’ responsibilities. Therefore, the purpose of this case study was to investigate how two Reading First coaches interpreted and enacted their professional development responsibilities. Cross-case analyses identified similarities and differences in coaches’ enactments. Findings revealed that while each coach engaged in similar professional development responsibilities (e.g. modeling, observing, and classroom walkthroughs) their approach to these responsibilities differed — collaborative versus expert driven. These differences in approaches indicate ...


Teaching, Writing, Writing Teaching: Reflective Journal Responses From Teaching Engl 1000, Christine Hamman Apr 2012

Teaching, Writing, Writing Teaching: Reflective Journal Responses From Teaching Engl 1000, Christine Hamman

Honors Theses

A series of reflective journals and responses written to reflect on and improve in the teaching of English. Each journal was written following each class meeting of a Fall 2011 ENGL 1000 course, reflecting on the lesson, activities, and teaching for the day. From these journals, responses were written for 9 of them and lesson plans for those days were revised and added for the purposes of comparison. Using research in best practices in teaching writing, educational training, and personal experience, responses were written to each journal to condense the strengths and weaknesses of my teaching, to chart progress as ...


Call For Submissions, Jonathan Bush Apr 2012

Call For Submissions, Jonathan Bush

Teaching/Writing: The Journal of Writing Teacher Education

Call for submissions


Competency Vs. Achievement: Why Connections Are So Important In Writing Teacher Education, Kristen Turner Apr 2012

Competency Vs. Achievement: Why Connections Are So Important In Writing Teacher Education, Kristen Turner

Teaching/Writing: The Journal of Writing Teacher Education

This article focuses on the importance of community in writing teacher education, focusing on the role of the National Writing Project in teacher development.


Promising Connections: Uniting Writing Teachers, Elizabeth Brockman, Ken Lindblom Apr 2012

Promising Connections: Uniting Writing Teachers, Elizabeth Brockman, Ken Lindblom

Teaching/Writing: The Journal of Writing Teacher Education

This article considers work that has brought writing teacher educators together in professional, social, and academic forums and looks towards the future of Teaching/Writing: The Journal of Writing Teacher Education.


Teaching Writing Together: Joining Stories, Joining Voices, Kirk Branch, Lisa Eckert Apr 2012

Teaching Writing Together: Joining Stories, Joining Voices, Kirk Branch, Lisa Eckert

Teaching/Writing: The Journal of Writing Teacher Education

This article considers the relationships and common bonds that helps composition specialists and English educators find opportunities for mutually supportive professional relationships and collaboration.


The Future Of Writing Teacher Education, Kia Jane Richmond, M. Kilian Mccurrie Apr 2012

The Future Of Writing Teacher Education, Kia Jane Richmond, M. Kilian Mccurrie

Teaching/Writing: The Journal of Writing Teacher Education

This article provides background for the creation of the journal and suggestions for future submissions and directions.


Opening Editorial: The Next Step In A Disciplinary Journey, Jonathan Bush Apr 2012

Opening Editorial: The Next Step In A Disciplinary Journey, Jonathan Bush

Teaching/Writing: The Journal of Writing Teacher Education

The opening editorial provides context for the journal.


Writing Teacher Education: Past And Present, Michelle Tremmel, Robert Tremmel Apr 2012

Writing Teacher Education: Past And Present, Michelle Tremmel, Robert Tremmel

Teaching/Writing: The Journal of Writing Teacher Education

This article provides an overview of some of the recent developments in writing teacher education and considers how the journal can add to this community,.


Inaugural Issue (Spring 2012): Full Issue Apr 2012

Inaugural Issue (Spring 2012): Full Issue

Teaching/Writing: The Journal of Writing Teacher Education

The inaugural issue of Teaching/Writing: The Journal of Writing Teacher Education includes invited articles by key figures within writing teacher education.


Establishment And Maintenance Of Academic Optimism In Michigan Elementary Schools: Academic Emphasis, Faculty Trust Of Students And Parents, Collective Efficacy, Jill Van Hof Apr 2012

Establishment And Maintenance Of Academic Optimism In Michigan Elementary Schools: Academic Emphasis, Faculty Trust Of Students And Parents, Collective Efficacy, Jill Van Hof

Dissertations

In response to heightened standards and calls for accountability, schools have dramatically intensified their work to meet the growing challenges. Schools require strategies for improvement that will transcend demographic factors such as SES. Research has shown the construct of academic optimism as contributing to student achievement despite a school’s socio-economic status (Goddard, LoGerfo, & Hoy, 2004; Goddard, Sweetland, & Hoy, 2000; Hoy, 2002; Hoy & Miskel, 2005; Hoy & Sabo, 1998; Hoy & Tarter, 1997; Hoy, Tarter, & Kottkamp, 1991; Hoy, Tarter, & Woolfolk, 2006; McGuigan & Hoy, 2006; Smith & Hoy, 2001; Tschannen-Moran, Hoy, & Hoy, 2000).

There exists, at the elementary level, a lack of research that describes conditions contributing to academic optimism. This research helps to fill that void by identifying, describing, and categorizing the norms, behaviors, strategies, and other pertinent characteristics that exist in a low-SES school that has established and is maintaining an academically optimistic environment.

Via two illustrative and critical-instance case studies in Michigan low-SES, and high-achieving elementary schools, this research describes the work and characteristics of an academically optimistic environment. Study results identify, describe, and categorize elementary school level norms, behaviors, strategies, and building characteristics that may have contributed to the development of one or more of the properties of academic optimism: academic emphasis, collective efficacy, and faculty trust.

Analysis of field-notes from observations, interviews, focus groups; and document reviews revealed two sets of deductive and inductive themes: five primary themes and three secondary themes. Primary themes include: expectations/goals, alignment, collaboration, communication, and a needs awareness/care ...


Teachers' Sense Of Professional Practices As A Result Of Mentoring, Leadriane L. Roby Apr 2012

Teachers' Sense Of Professional Practices As A Result Of Mentoring, Leadriane L. Roby

Dissertations

Formal mentoring programs focus on the probationary period of new teachers. Providing teachers with mentoring support during the initial years of teaching requires significant commitment and investment from school districts, mentors, and new teachers. Numerous studies argue the merits of mentoring programs, yet the research has been less clear about what happens once mentoring support has ended. The purpose of this study was to explore how mentored teachers, those beyond the formal mentoring experience, created sense and meaning of their teaching roles and developed professional practices after participation in a mentoring program.

There is an assumption that there is a ...