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1994

Extension publications

Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Education

G94-1207 Scab Of Wheat, John E. Watkins, Ben Doupnik, Jr. Jan 1994

G94-1207 Scab Of Wheat, John E. Watkins, Ben Doupnik, Jr.

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The identification of and disease cycle of wheat scab is described along with its management. Guidelines for using wheat contaminated with vomitoxin also are included.

Scab or Fusarium head blight is an important disease of wheat, barley, oats, rye and wheatgrasses. Scab manifests itself by the premature death or blighting of spikelets in the wheat head. Direct yield losses are often minor, but can be higher than 50 percent in severely infected fields. The economic significance is magnified by the possibility that the low quality, shriveled grain also can become contaminated by mycotoxins (e.g. vomitoxin, zearalenone).


G94-1198 Switchgrass And Big Bluestem For Grazing And Hay, Robert B. Mitchell, Lowell E. Moser, Bruce Anderson, Steven S. Waller Jan 1994

G94-1198 Switchgrass And Big Bluestem For Grazing And Hay, Robert B. Mitchell, Lowell E. Moser, Bruce Anderson, Steven S. Waller

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The grazing management and cultural practices discussed in this NebGuide can make switchgrass and big bluestem high quality summer forage. Switchgrass and big bluestem are native warm-season grasses that can provide abundant, high-quality forage during summer. Switchgrass and big bluestem produce 70 to 80 percent of their growth after June 1 in Nebraska, while more than 75 percent of cool-season grass growth, such as bromegrass and bluegrass, occurs before June 1. Therefore, switchgrass and big bluestem can provide forage to graze after cool-season pastures have been utilized. However, switchgrass and big bluestem must be managed differently than cool-season grasses. Poor ...


G94-1213 Child Care Environment Safety Checklist, Shirley Niemeyer, Michael P. Vogel Jan 1994

G94-1213 Child Care Environment Safety Checklist, Shirley Niemeyer, Michael P. Vogel

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide reviews statistics about child care services and offers suggestions on maintaining a safe environment for children in your care.

Being a child care provider means more than loving children. It means providing a safe environment for and protecting the children in your care so they can explore their world and develop trust.


G94-1212 Child Care Furnishings Safety Checklist, Shirley Niemeyer Jan 1994

G94-1212 Child Care Furnishings Safety Checklist, Shirley Niemeyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication presents information about the appropriate selection and evaluation of children's furniture.

A child's environment should allow for exploration, experiences, and learning; but it must be safe, too.

Parents and child care providers need to know about potential hazards in a child's environment. Often, these hazards involve misused or poorly designed products.


G94-1211 Safety In Children's Arts And Crafts Projects, Shirley Niemeyer Jan 1994

G94-1211 Safety In Children's Arts And Crafts Projects, Shirley Niemeyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the steps to take to ensure safety with arts and crafts materials and environments.

Arts and crafts activities let young children express themselves creatively. If you offer arts and crafts, it's important to have safe products and tools for the children in your care to use.

Some arts and crafts products contain solvents or materials that may expose children to toxic ingredients, fumes, or dusts.


G94-1185 Fertilizer And Pesticide Containment Guidelines, Larry D. Schulze, Gary Buttermore Jan 1994

G94-1185 Fertilizer And Pesticide Containment Guidelines, Larry D. Schulze, Gary Buttermore

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide summarizes Nebraska regulations on the proper storage of bulk liquid pesticides and fertilizers.

Significant quantities of agricultural chemicals -- both fertilizers and pesticides -- are used annually in Nebraska. Bulk supplies of these chemicals are stored for varying lengths of time by individual producers, chemical dealers, and custom applicators. Spills or potential leakage from storage tanks for liquid fertilizers and pesticides pose a major threat to the integrity of Nebraska's ground and surface water resources. Nebraska has a vital interest in protecting these resources and has made provisions to do so under the Nebraska Environmental Protection Act.


G94-1205 Shattercane And Its Control, Fred Roeth, Alex Martin, Robert N. Klein Jan 1994

G94-1205 Shattercane And Its Control, Fred Roeth, Alex Martin, Robert N. Klein

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Shattercane infestations may destroy a crop if not properly controlled. This NebGuide describes the characteristics of shattercane and discusses non-chemical, preemergence, herbicide incorporation and postemergence control.

Shattercane (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) is a forage-type sorghum also known as black amber, chicken-corn, and wild cane. Infestations are most prevalent in Nebraska river valleys and tributaries, but are found in upland areas also.


G94-1215 Bait Stations For Controlling Rats And Mice, Dallas R. Virchow, Scott E. Hygnstrom Jan 1994

G94-1215 Bait Stations For Controlling Rats And Mice, Dallas R. Virchow, Scott E. Hygnstrom

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the design and safe use of bait stations for rat and mouse control. It includes information on correct bait station placement and bait selection.

Toxic baits are often used to control the damage caused by Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) and house mice (Mus musculus). Bait stations used in rodent control programs may increase both the effectiveness and safety of rodent baits (rodenticides).


G94-1217 Rodent-Proof Construction: Drains And Feeding Equipment (Revised November 2003), Scott E. Hygnstrom, Dallas R. Virchow, Dennis M. Ferraro, Richard R. Stowell Jan 1994

G94-1217 Rodent-Proof Construction: Drains And Feeding Equipment (Revised November 2003), Scott E. Hygnstrom, Dallas R. Virchow, Dennis M. Ferraro, Richard R. Stowell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Techniques are described in this NebGuide for excluding rodents from drains, pipes, feed bunks, bins, and storage containers.

Rodents often travel along pipes, electrical cables, conduits, drains, and other equipment to gain access to buildings used for housing livestock and storing feed. Rodent-proof materials should be installed to prevent access to buildings along these routes. Additional methods to consider in an integrated pest management (IPM) program include sanitation, toxicants, and trapping.


G75-207 1994 Nebraska Farm Custom Rates - Part I (Revised August 1994), Raymond E. Massey Jan 1994

G75-207 1994 Nebraska Farm Custom Rates - Part I (Revised August 1994), Raymond E. Massey

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A survey of producers and custom operators was conducted in the spring of 1994 to collect rates the respondents expected to prevail for custom work done in 1994. Only rates for spring and summer practices were requested.

This NebGuide reports common custom rate charges in 1994.


G75-249 1994 Nebraska Farm Custom Rates - Part Ii (Revised February 1995), Raymond E. Massey Jan 1994

G75-249 1994 Nebraska Farm Custom Rates - Part Ii (Revised February 1995), Raymond E. Massey

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A survey of producers and custom machine operators was conducted in fall 1994 to determine the rates being charged for many late summer and fall farm machine practices.

This NebGuide defines custom rates and reports common charges in 1994.


G94-1209 Evaluating The Landscape Of A Prospective Home, Don Steinegger, Roch E. Gaussoin Jan 1994

G94-1209 Evaluating The Landscape Of A Prospective Home, Don Steinegger, Roch E. Gaussoin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses facts to consider when examining a prospective home's yard and landscape.

Often home buyers hire an inspector to evaluate the roof, plumbing, heating system, and structure of a prospective home. Seldom, however, does the landscape receive similar scrutiny.

Buyers should consider investing time and, perhaps, even money in careful evaluation of the landscape they might be purchasing. A healthy, well-designed, well-maintained landscape adds significant equity (15 percent or more) to a property's value. In a climate like Nebraska's, characterized by hot, windy summers and cold, windy winters, lawns, trees, and shrubs play a major ...


G94-1208 Managing The Alfalfa Weevil, Stephen D. Danielson, Thomas E. Hunt, Keith J. Jarvi Jan 1994

G94-1208 Managing The Alfalfa Weevil, Stephen D. Danielson, Thomas E. Hunt, Keith J. Jarvi

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The identification and life cycle of the alfalfa weevil are discussed along with scouting techniques, economic thresholds, and other integrated pest management tactics.

The alfalfa weevil is the primary insect pest of alfalfa in Nebraska. Management is essential to reduce crop losses, particularly during years when weevil infestation is high. Because there also are years when weevil damage is economically unimportant, it is necessary for growers to become familiar with sampling procedures, management guidelines, and control recommendations so control techniques are not used unnecessarily.


G94-1220 Controlling Ticks, John B. Campbell, Gustave D. Thomas Jan 1994

G94-1220 Controlling Ticks, John B. Campbell, Gustave D. Thomas

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Identification and control of ticks common to Nebraska.

Ticks are members of the same phylum (Arthropoda) of the animal kingdom as insects, but are in a different class (Arachnida). The main difference is the body of a tick is composed of only two sections while insect bodies have three sections.

There are over 800 species of ticks, 100 of which are important to man and animals because of economic losses or disease transmission. Fortunately in the United States, only about 12 species are economically important because they transmit disease organisms (viral, bacterial, protozoan, and rickettsial) or cause economic losses to ...


G94-1204 Face Fly Control Guide, John B. Campbell Jan 1994

G94-1204 Face Fly Control Guide, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The face fly congregates about the eyes and nose of animals, causing annoyance and possible disease transmission. This NebGuide discusses face fly breeding and effective controls.

The face fly closely resembles the house fly except it is slightly larger and darker. Other differentiating characteristics include: 1) the abdomen of the male face fly is orange and the female has an orange stripe; the abdomen of the house fly is white or light grey and 2) the compound eyes of male face flies nearly touch but are separated in the house flies.

The persistence and habit of congregating about the eyes ...


Nf94-206 Common Ground: The Case Of Seasonally Inundated Cropland, William Miller Jan 1994

Nf94-206 Common Ground: The Case Of Seasonally Inundated Cropland, William Miller

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Increasing waterfowl migration habitat has been a goal of many groups and individuals for decades. Individuals have provided money for habitat by supporting private organizations such as Ducks Unlimited, and through the purchase of hunting licenses, duck stamps, and habitat stamps. All these activities have helped, but funds have been limited so it has not been possible to provide enough wetland space for the migrating waterfowl.

This NebFact discusses cost effective ways to provide more waterfowl migration habitat on seasonally inundated crops and a seasonal strategy that could provide habitat for geese and ducks during the spring and fall migration ...