Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1986

Animal science

Life Sciences

Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Education

G86-775 Prussic Acid Poisoning, Norman Shcneider, Bruce Anderson Jan 1986

G86-775 Prussic Acid Poisoning, Norman Shcneider, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Prussic acid poisoning and its treatment are discussed in this NebGuide, along with methods to reduce its occurrence.

Sudangrass, forage sorghum, and sorghum-sudangrass hybrids are often used for summer pasture, green chop, hay, or silage. Under certain conditions, livestock consuming these feedstuffs may be poisoned by prussic acid (HCN).

Exposure to excessive prussic acid--also called hydrocyanic acid, hydrogen cyanide, or cyanide--can be fatal. However, producers can manage and feed their livestock to avoid problems with prussic acid.


G86-815 Reproductive Problems In Rams, Alan R. Doster, Dale M. Grotelueschen Jan 1986

G86-815 Reproductive Problems In Rams, Alan R. Doster, Dale M. Grotelueschen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Systematic examination of all males to be used for breeding can prevent reproductive failure, minimize nonpregnant ewes, and increase numbers of lambs born early during lambing season.

The importance of using only highly fertile, healthy rams in breeding programs cannot be overemphasized. This is especially true in the case of small producers where only one ram is required. The ram represents an often neglected part of sheep production.


G86-799 Health Management And Recommended Vaccinations For Dairy Replacements, Duane Rice, R. Gene White Jan 1986

G86-799 Health Management And Recommended Vaccinations For Dairy Replacements, Duane Rice, R. Gene White

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the importance of having a good vaccination schedule, and provides recommendations on which vaccinations to give, depending on variables. Correct management decisions are necessary to realize maximum returns on investments in any dairy operation. Dairymen sometimes assume there is a quick remedy for health problems, but the prevention of disease is by far less expensive. Preventing health problems in the dairy herd goes much further than using a veterinarian to treat individual animals with emergency problems. A veterinarian with experience and a genuine interest in dairy cattle is essential to assist the dairyman with herd health problems ...


G86-797 Causes Of Vaccination-Immunization Failures In Livestock, Duane Rice, E. Denis Erickson, Dale Grotelueschen Jan 1986

G86-797 Causes Of Vaccination-Immunization Failures In Livestock, Duane Rice, E. Denis Erickson, Dale Grotelueschen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses reasons why vaccinations fail to provide immunity against disease, and how to prevent this from happening.

To comprehend the many reasons for vaccine failure, it is important to understand how animals and humans have the ability to resist infectious diseases. It is also important to know what a disease is and how it affects the animal.

According to Stedman's Dictionary, disease is an interruption, cessation or disorder of body functions, systems or organs. Diseases may be obvious even to the untrained eye, or detectable only by sophisticated testing procedures (subclinical disease). Serious irreversible damage may be ...


G86-783 Complete Rations -- Should You Feed Them?, Foster G. Owen Jan 1986

G86-783 Complete Rations -- Should You Feed Them?, Foster G. Owen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the advantages and disadvantages of feeding complete rations to dairy herds.

Using the complete ration system for feeding dairy cows has become increasingly popular. Nutritionists generally consider it the ideal method of feeding dairy cattle. Milk production per cow can be maximized, and feed and labor costs minimized, with this system. However, the necessary equipment is expensive and may be excessive for loose-housed herds of less than 100 cows.


G86-818 How To Use The Milk Progesterone Tests, Larry L. Larson Jan 1986

G86-818 How To Use The Milk Progesterone Tests, Larry L. Larson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide discusses the basis for milk progesterone tests, using the test to confirm estrus, as an early indicator of pregnancy, and the availability and costs of kits. Milk progesterone test kits are now commercially available for on-farm use. Correct interpretation of the test results requires accurate estrous detection and good records. Properly used, these tests can help determine (1) if a cow is near estrus and potentially could conceive if bred, or (2) as an early indicator of pregnancy.


G86-820 How To Maximize Income By Managing Days Dry, Jeffrey F. Keown Jan 1986

G86-820 How To Maximize Income By Managing Days Dry, Jeffrey F. Keown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide discusses the benefits of maintaining the optimum calving interval and offers suggestions for accomplishing this reproductive management technique.

Most dairy producers are aware that an optimum calving interval is 365 days. This is a normal lactation length of 305 days with a dry period of 60 days. This interval is often looked at as a goal to strive toward rather than a goal that must be reached to maximize income from the sale of milk.


G86-822 How To Estimate A Dairy Herd's Reproductive Losses, Jeffrey F. Keown Jan 1986

G86-822 How To Estimate A Dairy Herd's Reproductive Losses, Jeffrey F. Keown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Remedies for herd losses caused by calving interval, dry periods, A.I. performance, and age at first freshening.

One of the major areas of lost income to the dairy producer is in the reproductive performance of the dairy herd. These losses are often overlooked because they are indirect costs. If producers could be given a monthly bill indicating the amount of money that improper reproductive management has cost them, then drastic changes would occur.

The majority of reproductive losses occur in the following areas:

1. Calving interval too long or too short.

2. Dry period too long or too short ...