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G78-395 Feeding Corn And Sorghum Silages To Beef Cattle, Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1978

G78-395 Feeding Corn And Sorghum Silages To Beef Cattle, Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Corn and sorghum silages are versatile feeds that can be supplemented so that they are satisfactory for part of most growing and finishing rations. Harvesting corn as silage and planting forage sorghums for silage have the advantage that they maximize beef production per acre compared to harvesting these crops by other methods and other cropping programs. Another important advantage is that harvesting, storage and feeding can be completely mechanized.

However, as the costs of machinery, fuel, and labor have increased, the cost of harvesting silage has increased more rapidly than harvesting as grain.


G78-409 Cattle Grub Control In Nebraska (Revised November 1989), John B. Campbell Jan 1978

G78-409 Cattle Grub Control In Nebraska (Revised November 1989), John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The control of cattle grubs is discussed here, as are possible insecticide reactions, warnings and restrictions.

Cattle grubs are the immature or larval stages of heel or warble flies. Losses from this insect begin with the fly stage in the insect's life history. As flies seek animals on which to deposit eggs, cattle become frightened and run. The running animal has its tail in the air, bent over the back. This behavior is termed "gadding."

Cattle fail to graze normally during the warble fly season because of gadding. They seek shade or stand in water to avoid the flies ...


G78-396 Making Quality Corn And Sorghum Silage (Revised December 1986), Paul G. Guyer, Foster G. Owen Jan 1978

G78-396 Making Quality Corn And Sorghum Silage (Revised December 1986), Paul G. Guyer, Foster G. Owen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Harvesting corn and sorghum forage as silage is popular because it adapts to complete mechanization of forage production, harvesting, and feeding. It fits operations where capital can profitably replace labor. If you are going to harvest corn and sorghum forage as silage you need to make quality silage. Here's how.


G78-426 Popcorn Production, Nora D'Croz-Mason, Richard P. Waldren Jan 1978

G78-426 Popcorn Production, Nora D'Croz-Mason, Richard P. Waldren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide addresses seed selection, soil requirements, production management, pest control, marketing and sale of popcorn.

Commercial popcorn production in the United States has always been concentrated in the Corn Belt. Iowa was the largest popcorn producer until the mid 1940s. As hybrids replaced open-pollinated varieties, popcorn production shifted to Illinois then to Indiana. During the mid 1970s popcorn production moved west, and in 1977 Nebraska became the nation's largest producer. During the 1980s popcorn acreage has fluctuated among states, but Nebraska often has had the nation's highest yield because 85 percent of its crop is irrigated.


Ec78-1233 Pruning Fruit Trees, Don Steinegger Jan 1978

Ec78-1233 Pruning Fruit Trees, Don Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Productive fruit trees with an abundance of high quality fruit don't just happen. They result from good cultural practices, including pruning. Pruning is often neglected either due to a lack of pruning skills and knowledge or a fear that one is going to injure or kill the tree.

A major requirement for the backyard farmer is a small tree open enough to allow effective spraying with home equipment and ready gathering of fruit. Pruning, combined with growing dwarf fruit trees will help accomplish this requirement. Although pruning is essential in development and maintenance of fruit trees, excessive pruning in ...


G78-391 Controlling Poultry Insects, Robert E. Roselle, Earl W. Gleaves Jan 1978

G78-391 Controlling Poultry Insects, Robert E. Roselle, Earl W. Gleaves

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication contains information on the control of poultry insects. Poultry Lice Poultry lice are small, wingless insects with chewing mouthparts. The most common in Nebraska are brown chicken lice and chicken body lice. Less important are large chicken lice, shaft lice, chicken head lice, fluff lice, and several other species which are rarely present. Poultry Mites Several kinds of mites attack poultry. The most common are chicken mites and northern fowl mites. Occasionally scaley-leg mites are a problem.


G78-412 Guide For Controlling Insects On Pets (Revised December 1989), John B. Campbell, David L. Keith Jan 1978

G78-412 Guide For Controlling Insects On Pets (Revised December 1989), John B. Campbell, David L. Keith

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide is restricted to the most common insect pests of cats, dogs, rabbits, birds, guinea pigs, and gerbils.

Pets, like all animals, are subject to attack by certain insects. Sanitation around the area where pets are kept, cleanliness of the pets, good care and nutrition all help reduce the chance of a serious problem.


G78-421 How To Choose An Irrigation Consultant, James R. Gilley Jan 1978

G78-421 How To Choose An Irrigation Consultant, James R. Gilley

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Presented here are some guidelines and criteria to aid in the selection process for irrigation management assistance.

The complexity of agricultural technology makes it difficult for the farmer to apply this technology on a day-by-day basis. Refinement and application of agricultural technology in the field has generally been through industrial representatives and federal and state extension programs.


G78-393 Water Measurement Calculations (Revised November 1984), Dean E. Eisenhauer, Paul E. Fischbach Jan 1978

G78-393 Water Measurement Calculations (Revised November 1984), Dean E. Eisenhauer, Paul E. Fischbach

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Water measurement is an important tool for checking irrigation management skills. Irrigators can use one of several methods to measure water. To take advantage of water management data, a knowledge of water measurement calculations is important.

Units of Water Measurement

There are two conditions under which water is measured--at rest and in motion. Volume units are used for water at rest. Water in motion is described in units of flow.


G78-392 Selecting And Using Irrigation Propeller Meters (Revised May 1984), Dean E. Eisenhauer Jan 1978

G78-392 Selecting And Using Irrigation Propeller Meters (Revised May 1984), Dean E. Eisenhauer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the use of propeller type irrigation meters to monitor irrigation water use.

Measuring irrigation water is important in efficient water management. Measuring water can be used for the following purposes:

1. Checking irrigation efficiency

2. Determining pumping plant efficiency

3. Detecting well and pump problems


G78-406 Fertilizing Grass Pastures And Haylands, Bruce Anderson, Charles A. Shapiro Jan 1978

G78-406 Fertilizing Grass Pastures And Haylands, Bruce Anderson, Charles A. Shapiro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This article discusses managing nitrogen and using phosphorus and other nutrients for grass pastures and hay-lands. Pastures are important to many livestock producers in Nebraska, but production from many pastures is low. Research shows that fertilizing, weed control and rotational grazing increases grass production from pastures, resulting in greater livestock production. Fertilizing and controlling weeds on haylands also increases production. Since more plant material is removed when land is managed as hayland, more attention needs to be paid to fertilization. In addition to increasing grass production, fertilizing can improve forage quality. On-the-farm demonstrations show that fertilizing increases the amount of ...


G78-390 Right Crop Stage For Herbicide Use Alfalfa, Sugarbeets, Soybeans, And Fieldbeans (Revised January 1987), Robert G. Wilson, Alex Martin Jan 1978

G78-390 Right Crop Stage For Herbicide Use Alfalfa, Sugarbeets, Soybeans, And Fieldbeans (Revised January 1987), Robert G. Wilson, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

If you are using herbicides on alfalfa, sugarbeets, soybeans, or fieldbeans, information in this Guide will help you apply them at the proper time for best weed control with a minimum of crop injury. Proper timing of postemergence herbicides is essential to achieve maximum weed control with minimum crop injury. As field crops grow and mature, their tolerance to herbicides changes. As a general rule, annual and biennial weeds are more susceptible to postemergence herbicides when they are in the seedling stage, becoming increasingly difficult to control as they mature. The grower is thus faced with the problem of when ...


G78-417 Leptospirosis Of Domestic Animals, Donald B. Hudson Jan 1978

G78-417 Leptospirosis Of Domestic Animals, Donald B. Hudson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Leptospirosis of domestic animals is a very complex disease. This NebGuide examines its diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

Introduction

Leptospirosis is an infectious disease of animals and man caused by a spiral-shaped organism (spirochete) of the genus Leptospira. The important serotypes recognized in livestock in the United States include Leptospira pomona, L. canicola, L. icterohaemorrhagiae, L. grippotyphosa and L. hardjo. These organisms have a wide host range, including man. Among domestic animals, swine, cattle, dogs, and horses are most frequently affected. Known wildlife hosts include many of the small rodents, raccoons, foxes, opossums, skunks, deer, and moose.

Because of the nature ...


G78-389 Nutrient Requirements Of Breeding Beef Cattle, James A. Gosey, Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1978

G78-389 Nutrient Requirements Of Breeding Beef Cattle, James A. Gosey, Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The major nutrient requirements as listed in Tables 1a and b are modifications of similar tables published by the National Research Council, Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle, fifth edition. They have been (1) rearranged to emphasize "English" weights rather than metric; (2) modified so that daily nutrient requirements and the nutrient concentration recommendations are in closer agreement and (3) expanded to include estimated requirements for pregnant yearling heifers of heavier weight and 2 year old heifer nursing calves.


Heg78-94 Electrical Appliances And The Energy Dollar, Janet Wilson Jan 1978

Heg78-94 Electrical Appliances And The Energy Dollar, Janet Wilson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains information on the typical wattage of various home appliances.

Living costs are at an all-time high. The purchase of electric appliances represents a fairly large expenditure in a family budget and the cost of electricity is increasing. There is no indication these costs will come down. So, if you are concerned about cutting expenses and choosing energy-efficient appliances, you will need to choose appliances carefully.


G78-416 The Importance Of The "Basis" In Trading On The Futures Market, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1978

G78-416 The Importance Of The "Basis" In Trading On The Futures Market, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide contains information on understanding the basis aspect of hedging.

The producer who wants to employ hedging as a marketing alternative needs to understand "basis." Hedging as used here is the selling of a futures contract to establish a price for a commodity the producer has on hand that will be sold at some later date. An example is corn held in storage in November that the producer plans to sell in May. This is formally known as a selling hedge. In hedging the producer is establishing in advance the price he will receive when the grain is sold ...


Ec78-219 1978 Nebraska Swine Report, Dwane R. Zimmerman, Roger Kinsey, Roy Carlson, Bobby D. Moser, Dean Boyd, Wayne R. Cast, R. D. Fritschen, Donald L. Ferguson, Jerry Jensen, E. R. Peo Jr., James A. Deshazer, David P. Shelton, D. M. Danielson, M.E. England, D.S. Pollman, Bruce Treffer, William Ahlschwede, Larry W. Olson, T. E. Socha Jan 1978

Ec78-219 1978 Nebraska Swine Report, Dwane R. Zimmerman, Roger Kinsey, Roy Carlson, Bobby D. Moser, Dean Boyd, Wayne R. Cast, R. D. Fritschen, Donald L. Ferguson, Jerry Jensen, E. R. Peo Jr., James A. Deshazer, David P. Shelton, D. M. Danielson, M.E. England, D.S. Pollman, Bruce Treffer, William Ahlschwede, Larry W. Olson, T. E. Socha

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 1978 Nebraska Swine Report was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating departments for use in the Extension and Teaching programs at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Authors from the following areas contributed to this publication: Swine Nutrition, swine diseases, pathology, economics, engineering, swine breeding, meats, agronomy, and diagnostic laboratory. It covers the following areas: breeding, disease control, feeding, nutrition, economics, housing and meats.


G73-8 Fertilizing Sugar Beets (Revised June 1978), L.A. Daigger, F.N. Anderson, D. Knudsen Jan 1978

G73-8 Fertilizing Sugar Beets (Revised June 1978), L.A. Daigger, F.N. Anderson, D. Knudsen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Management practices which provide an adequate, but not excessive, supply of plant nutrients are essential for high yields of high quality sugarbeets in western Nebraska. This publication discusses the amounts of nitrogen, rainfall or irrigation, and applied fertilizer that are needed to produce sugar beets.


G78-398 Irrigated Small Grain Production, Philip Grabouski, Walter Trimmer, Louis Daigger Jan 1978

G78-398 Irrigated Small Grain Production, Philip Grabouski, Walter Trimmer, Louis Daigger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Excellent management practices for irrigated small grains are necessary to obtain high yields. What varieties should I use? How should the seedbed be prepared? What row spacing is best? What plant nutrients are needed? How much fertilizer should I use? When should I apply the fertilizer? What is the water intake rate of my soil? How much will it hold? When is the best time to irrigate? These are some of the questions in the mind of the irrigated small grain producer and are answered in this NebGuide.


G78-394 Parity Prices, Everett E. Peterson Jan 1978

G78-394 Parity Prices, Everett E. Peterson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Under the Food and Agriculture Act of 1977, parity prices are used to determine support levels for only two commodities: sugar and milk. However, interest in parity prices as goals for support prices of other farm products persists in farm policy discussion because of such use in 40 years of agricultural programs, and because the term "parity" carries connotations of equity for agriculture in relation to other economic sectors.

This NebGuide defines what is a parity price, how it is computed, and the parity ratio.


Ec78-1744 Prairie Fires And The Nebraska Pioneer, Donald E. Westover Jan 1978

Ec78-1744 Prairie Fires And The Nebraska Pioneer, Donald E. Westover

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

For thousands of years prairie fires were a common occurrence in the great plains region of North America. Along with wind, rain, snow, and sunshine, fire was a major ecological force. Long before the white man's influence became a factor Nebraska's prairie land had been shaped, even perpetuated by this ever present force. The following incidents are true life accounts of prairie fires as experienced by homesteaders and settlers around the turn of the century. No attempt has been made to change the grammar or the content of these stories. The words you read are those used by ...


Ec78-1737 Broadleaf Trees For Nebraska, Neal E. Jennings, Richard J. Gavit, Jerry L. Mohler, Gary T. Christoff Jan 1978

Ec78-1737 Broadleaf Trees For Nebraska, Neal E. Jennings, Richard J. Gavit, Jerry L. Mohler, Gary T. Christoff

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This extension circular shows and describes broadleaf trees that will grow in Nebraska. It should prove valuable when selecting a tree best suited for a specific area and purpose. Most of this publication is devoted to detailed descriptions of tree species. In addition, the main points of tree placement, tree planting and tree care are discussed.