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Full-Text Articles in Education

Preparing Fabric For Use, Rose Marie Tondl Apr 1991

Preparing Fabric For Use, Rose Marie Tondl

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Grain perfection is the goal for people who sew. Smart styling and a professional look in clothing construction require correct use of the grain of the fabric. No formula or method can conceal a poorly cut garment.


G91-1047 Acidosis, Rick Stock, Robert Britton Jan 1991

G91-1047 Acidosis, Rick Stock, Robert Britton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses why acidosis occurs, its economic considerations, and methods to prevent and treat acidosis.

Acidosis is the most important nutritional disorder in feedlots today. Caused by a rapid production and absorption of acids from the rumen when cattle consume too much starch (primarily grain) or sugar in a short period of time, acidosis causes cattle to be stressed. As long as cattle are finished on grain, cows are grazed on cornstalk fields (grain consumption) or high energy (grain) diets are fed to dairy cows, acidosis will be an important problem.

Cattle evolved digesting roughages that ferment slowly in ...


G91-1060 Black Spot Of Roses, John E. Watkins Jan 1991

G91-1060 Black Spot Of Roses, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Black spot, Nebraska's most troublesome rose disease, can be controlled through selection of a resistant cultivar, spaced plantings, and an active fungicide spray program.

Roses are one of the most versatile and inspiring ornamentals for landscaping. There are roses adapted for any garden site and landscape purpose. Roses are not always easy to grow and may require a little more management than other ornamentals. One of the greatest challenges to successfully growing garden roses is disease control.


G91-1035 Tree Injuries -- Prevention And Care (Revised July 2002), Dave Mooter, Mike Kuhns Jan 1991

G91-1035 Tree Injuries -- Prevention And Care (Revised July 2002), Dave Mooter, Mike Kuhns

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

It takes proper care and maintenance to keep trees healthy and safe. This is a guide toward that objective.

It has been said that a tree is not planted until it has been in the ground five years. This is especially true in Nebraska, where trees are sometimes difficult to grow.


Nf91-12 "Living" Trust: Cause For Consumer Concern, Kathy Prochaska-Cue Jan 1991

Nf91-12 "Living" Trust: Cause For Consumer Concern, Kathy Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses warnings about possible scams related to living trusts in Nebraska.


G91-1059 Point-And-Figure Analysis, Robin R. Riley, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1991

G91-1059 Point-And-Figure Analysis, Robin R. Riley, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is the ninth and final NebGuide providing an overview for producers using technical analysis in marketing decisions. It covers point-and-figure analysis.

The point-and-figure chart is one kind of chart commonly used by people tracking prices in the futures market.

To construct this type of chart you need graph paper, a pencil, price information, and a little time to learn the technique. Charting services also offer point-and-figure charts for a fee.


G91-1010 Managing Corn And Sorghum Residues During The Ecofarming Fallow Period, Robert N. Klein, Gail A. Wicks Jan 1991

G91-1010 Managing Corn And Sorghum Residues During The Ecofarming Fallow Period, Robert N. Klein, Gail A. Wicks

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide explains how to maintain an appropriate residue cover with ecofarming in the fallow period before winter wheat to reduce soil erosion and conserve soil moisture. Ecofarming is a system of controlling weeds and managing crop residues throughout a crop rotation with minimum use of tillage. This will reduce soil erosion and production costs while increasing weed control, water infiltration, moisture conservation and crop yields. In the winter wheat-ecofallow corn or grain sorghum-fallow rotation, corn or grain sorghum is no-till planted into winter wheat stubble in May. During the previous summer or fall the winter wheat stubble was treated ...


Nf91-50 Bee Pollination Of Cucurbit Crops, Laurie Hodges, Fred Baxendale Jan 1991

Nf91-50 Bee Pollination Of Cucurbit Crops, Laurie Hodges, Fred Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses bee pollination of cucurbit crops.


Ec91-735 The Impact Of Nitrogen And Irrigation Management And Vadose Zone Conditions On Ground Water Contamination By Nitrate-Nitrogen, K.D. Frank, Darrell Watts, Andrew Christiansen, Edwin Penas Jan 1991

Ec91-735 The Impact Of Nitrogen And Irrigation Management And Vadose Zone Conditions On Ground Water Contamination By Nitrate-Nitrogen, K.D. Frank, Darrell Watts, Andrew Christiansen, Edwin Penas

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The single largest contaminant found in ground water samples taken throughout Nebraska is nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate-N). Much of it reaches the ground water as a "non-point source" contaminant leached out of the crop root zone.

Nitrate-N is essential to corn production. However, when leached from the crop root zone it can become a major source of ground water contamination. There are serious contamination problems in shallow aquifers beneath several river valleys in Nebraska. Increasing nitrate-N concentrations are beginning to appear in deeper aquifer.


G91-1034 Evaluating The Feeding Value Of Fibrous Feeds For Dairy Cattle, Rick J. Grant Jan 1991

G91-1034 Evaluating The Feeding Value Of Fibrous Feeds For Dairy Cattle, Rick J. Grant

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes what makes fiber unique as a nutrient, how it's measured, and the impact different dietary fiber levels have on milk production and feed intake.

Fiber content of feed or forage affects its feeding value. Understanding fiber and how it is used is necessary to properly feed dairy cows. Each of the following topics will be addressed to better understand fiber nutrition in the dairy cow:

1. What is fiber?

2. How will too little or too much fiber in the diet affect the cow's metabolism and subsequent production?

3. What are optimal levels of fiber ...


G91-1019 Set Up Of Tillage, Planting And Directed Spray Equipment, Elbert C. Dickey, Robert Grisso, Alex Martin Jan 1991

G91-1019 Set Up Of Tillage, Planting And Directed Spray Equipment, Elbert C. Dickey, Robert Grisso, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses how to set up and operate liquid herbicide application equipment on tillage, planting and directed spray equipment.

Some herbicides require incorporation to obtain consistent weed control. Maintaining residue cover to reduce soil loss on erodible soils makes it necessary to incorporate herbicide while minimizing tillage. This need, combined with many row crop producers' preference for band application to reduce herbicide costs, creates some application challenges.


G91-1020 Plumbing Systems Of Agricultural Sprayers, Robert D. Grisso, David L. Varner, Robert N. Klein Jan 1991

G91-1020 Plumbing Systems Of Agricultural Sprayers, Robert D. Grisso, David L. Varner, Robert N. Klein

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Properly adjusting and maintaining the plumbing systems of agricultural sprayers can improve the efficiency and uniformity of chemical applications. The plumbing systems of agricultural sprayers are usually considered foolproof. Sprayer problems may occur however, when plumbing and/or modifications are improperly done or maintenance is ignored. Retrofitting, addition of electrical control systems, and replacement of pumps or nozzles require knowledge of the plumbing system and how changes will affect sprayer performance. Routine maintenance of the plumbing systems is essential.


G91-1024 Two Crops In One Year: Relay Intercropping, Gary Lesoing, Russell Moomaw, Charles Francis Jan 1991

G91-1024 Two Crops In One Year: Relay Intercropping, Gary Lesoing, Russell Moomaw, Charles Francis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication covers crop variety selection, weed control, and other cultural practices for relay intercropping a crop like soybeans into growing winter wheat or oats.

Multiple cropping refers to growing two crops on the same field during the same year. One method of multiple cropping is doublecropping, which is the growing of a second crop after harvest of the first crop. In Nebraska, where opportunities for doublecropping are limited, relay intercropping is a possible alternative.

In relay intercropping, two crops are in the field at the same time during part of the season. A small grain is usually relay intercropped ...


G91-1009 Getting Started In Ecofarming: Growing The Winter Wheat Crop, Gail A. Wicks, Robert N. Klein, Drew J. Lyon Jan 1991

G91-1009 Getting Started In Ecofarming: Growing The Winter Wheat Crop, Gail A. Wicks, Robert N. Klein, Drew J. Lyon

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Cultural practices can improve the weed competitiveness of winter wheat in an ecofallow program, thus increasing the effectiveness of herbicides. Ecofarming is a popular conservation tillage practice used in Nebraska areas where winter wheat is produced. It requires a high degree of management, but the rewards through higher crop yields and erosion protection are worth the effort. In Nebraska the winter wheat-fallow rotation is the common rotation used in areas of less than 17 inches of rainfall, while in areas that receive 17 to 22 inches the winter wheat-corn or sorghum fallow rotation is most common. In 1988, 41 percent ...


G91-1046 Conservation Tillage And Planting Systems, Paul J. Jasa, David P. Shelton, Alice J. Jones, Elbert C. Dickey Jan 1991

G91-1046 Conservation Tillage And Planting Systems, Paul J. Jasa, David P. Shelton, Alice J. Jones, Elbert C. Dickey

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Tillage system descriptions and comparisons are included here. Moldboard plowing, followed by such secondary tillage operations as disking and harrowing, was once the most common, or traditional, tillage system before planting. Soil erosion potential from rainfall on sloping lands was great and requirements for labor and fuel were high compared to other tillage and planting systems. One of the most commonly used tillage systems in Nebraska today is two diskings followed by field cultivation. Unfortunately, the potential for soil erosion may be great because the number of tillage operations involved may not leave adequate residue cover for erosion control. Today ...


G91-1025 Two Crops In One Year: Doublecropping, Russell Moomaw, Gary Lesoing, Charles Francis Jan 1991

G91-1025 Two Crops In One Year: Doublecropping, Russell Moomaw, Gary Lesoing, Charles Francis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Choice of crops, weed control, and other cultural practices for successful doublecropping are discussed here.

Multiple cropping refers to growing two crops on the same field during the same year. One method of multiple cropping is doublecropping, which is when one crop is grown after the first crop is harvested. Prime USA regions for doublecropping are the eastern cornbelt, and southeastern and south central states where relatively long growing seasons and abundant rainfall occur. By contrast, shorter growing seasons and less frequent rainfall limit the potential for doublecropping in Nebraska.

Irrigation is essential for successful doublecropping in Nebraska. Without irrigation ...


G91-1026 Sunflower Production In Nebraska, James A. Schild, David D. Baltensperger, Drew J. Lyon, Gary L. Hein, Eric D. Kerr Jan 1991

G91-1026 Sunflower Production In Nebraska, James A. Schild, David D. Baltensperger, Drew J. Lyon, Gary L. Hein, Eric D. Kerr

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Seeds, seedbed preparations, fertilizing and controlling weeds in sunflowers are among the topics covered here. Sunflowers are native to Nebraska. Cultivated for centuries by native American Indians as a food crop, sunflowers were taken to Europe in the mid-16th century. Oilseed sunflowers have been a U.S. crop since 1986. Sunflower production is divided into two market classes, oil and confectionery. The oil type is by far the most commonly grown market class. Recent health trends have brought sunflower cooking oil into prominence because the oil is low in saturated fats. Confectionery types are grown for the edible roasted sunflower ...


Nf91-51 Kale: The "New" Old Vegetable, Laurie Hodges Jan 1991

Nf91-51 Kale: The "New" Old Vegetable, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses kale.


Nf91-43 Blossom End Rot In Tomatoes, Laurie Hodges, Don Steinegger Jan 1991

Nf91-43 Blossom End Rot In Tomatoes, Laurie Hodges, Don Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses the causes, prevention and treatment of blossom end rot in tomatoes.


Ec91-1767 Windbreaks For Rural Living, James R. Brandle, Teresa K. Boes, Bruce Wight Jan 1991

Ec91-1767 Windbreaks For Rural Living, James R. Brandle, Teresa K. Boes, Bruce Wight

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In many parts of the United States, the constant force of the wind exaggerates daily weather conditions and can make living in these areas seem unbearable. A well-designed windbreak around the home, ranch, or farmstead slows the wind and improves the overall environment. Farm and ranch windbreaks conserve energy, provide snow control, improve working and recreational environments, enhance wildlife populations, provide visual screening and dust control, and increase the production of various wood and food products.

Ranch and farmstead windbreaks provide the greatest benefits in areas with high winds, large amounts of snow, extreme temperature fluctuations, or minimal natural forest ...


Ec91-1764 Windbreak Establishment, James R. Brandle, Patricia Boehner, Sherman Finch Jan 1991

Ec91-1764 Windbreak Establishment, James R. Brandle, Patricia Boehner, Sherman Finch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

successful windbreak planting depends on proper establishment and care during the first few years after planting. Time spent in site preparation, weed control, and replanting is repaid many times during the lifetime of the windbreak. Take no shortcuts in the planning and establishment of your windbreak.

Windbreaks are investments in the future value of your property. Each windbreak system is unique and your windbreak should be designed for your site and objectives. Your local conservation office can provide help in designing and installing your windbreak. These organizations can also help with recommendations on where to buy planting stock and how ...


Ec91-1771 Windbreaks And Wildlife, Ron J. Johnson, James R. Brandle, Mary M. Beck Jan 1991

Ec91-1771 Windbreaks And Wildlife, Ron J. Johnson, James R. Brandle, Mary M. Beck

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Windbreaks can support wildlife that add beauty and pleasure to our lives. They also sustain birds that eat insect pests, improve hunting opportunities, and provide a focal point for family outdoor activities. The world around us would be less appealing without the stimulation--the color, sounds, tracks, and mystery--of wild creatures; windbreaks help wildlife and in some areas are essential to survival of the wildlife we enjoy. You can add wildlife benefits to windbreak plantings whether your main goal is to shelter crops, livestock, roads, or a home or farmstead. This publication provides an overview of windbreaks and wildlife, and gives ...


G91-1036 Environmental Stresses And Tree Health, Jon S. Wilson, Mark O. Harrell Jan 1991

G91-1036 Environmental Stresses And Tree Health, Jon S. Wilson, Mark O. Harrell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide is intended to help tree owners identify tree health problems caused by environmental factors, and ways to prevent or reduce damage.

Environmental stresses cause many health problems of Nebraska trees. Hot and cold temperatures, drying winds, poor soil and root conditions and man's activities can cause direct damage to leaves, bark and roots, and can predispose trees to secondary insect and disease attack. Maintaining a tree in good condition through proper maintenance can prevent many environmentally related health problems.


Nf91-40 Insulation Information For Nebraska Homeowners, Ann Ziebarth Jan 1991

Nf91-40 Insulation Information For Nebraska Homeowners, Ann Ziebarth

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses insulation.


Nf91-39 Precipitation And Sprinkler Irrigation Monitoring For Managing Irrigation Scheduling, Steve Meyer, Kenneth Hubbard Jan 1991

Nf91-39 Precipitation And Sprinkler Irrigation Monitoring For Managing Irrigation Scheduling, Steve Meyer, Kenneth Hubbard

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses precipitation and sprinkler irrigation monitoring for managing irrigation scheduling.


G91-1013 Nursing Home Insurance Insights, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1991

G91-1013 Nursing Home Insurance Insights, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Definitions of nursing home care and alternatives for covering nursing home costs are covered in this guide.

Nursing home costs now average $22,000 or more annually nationwide. A recent Massachusetts research study found that almost half of the single 75-year-olds interviewed would be poor within three months after entering a nursing home. Almost three-quarters would have nothing left within a year.


G91-1029 Preventing Fruiting In Woody Plants, Don Steinegger Jan 1991

G91-1029 Preventing Fruiting In Woody Plants, Don Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide covers what to use to prevent fruiting or remove fruit from ornamental landscape trees and shrubs.

The ideal shrub or tree for a home landscape is one that is aesthetically pleasing, architecturally suitable, and adapted to its site. Aesthetically, plants with season-long foliage and fall color are desirable. The landscape value of these plants increase if they also produce flowers and fruits.

Despite the increased value of a flowering plant, some people consider spent flowers and fruits undesirable litter, especially when they fall on driveways and sidewalks. Also, plants producing edible fruit and serving as landscape plants require ...


G91-1022 Guide To Growing Houseplants, Don Steinegger, Frederick P. Baxendale, John E. Watkins Jan 1991

G91-1022 Guide To Growing Houseplants, Don Steinegger, Frederick P. Baxendale, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Proper care can extend houseplants' lives. This NebGuide offers hints on conditioning, light, fertilizing and more.

Many people enjoy houseplants; in fact, raising them is one of the fastest growing indoor hobbies. Caring for houseplants offers opportunities for people who like to work with living things and watch them develop. Today, houseplants are an integral part of indoor decor -- especially in winter.

An artificial indoor environment often hinders plant development. High temperatures, low humidity, lack of sunlight, poor soil conditions, and improper watering contribute to most houseplant problems. In addition, insects or plant diseases occasionally damage houseplants.

While plants last ...


G91-1015 Perennials, Don Steinegger, Anne Streich Jan 1991

G91-1015 Perennials, Don Steinegger, Anne Streich

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes perennial flowers that will withstand Nebraska's winters outdoors and that will bloom within the growing season.

Herbaceous perennials normally live for many years under local growing conditions, dying back to the ground each winter. They vary in height, leaf texture and flower color, and are the backbone of the flower garden for many home gardeners.


G91-1014 Ornamental Shrubs For Nebraska, Don Steinegger, Amy J. Greving Jan 1991

G91-1014 Ornamental Shrubs For Nebraska, Don Steinegger, Amy J. Greving

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide outlines the characteristics of the ornamental shrubs that can be grown in Nebraska.

Shrubs play an important role in landscaping. They can be used as hedge borders, focal points, along the foundation of a home to "tie" it to the ground, and to fill large areas. Unlike annual flowers, or even some perennials, shrubs are usually planted with permanence in mind.