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Full-Text Articles in Education

G85-753 Irrigation Scheduling Using Crop Water Use Data, C. Dean Yonts, Norman L. Klocke Jan 1985

G85-753 Irrigation Scheduling Using Crop Water Use Data, C. Dean Yonts, Norman L. Klocke

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes using the "checkbook" method to schedule irrigations based on crop water use data.

Irrigation scheduling determines when and how much water to apply to meet crop demand. Soil water status and current crop water use are key factors for scheduling irrigations. Field observations and crop growth stage are important, but scheduled irrigations result in better rainfall use while avoiding crop water stress or excessive irrigation.


G85-762 Soybean Yield Loss Due To Hail Damage, Charles A. Shapiro, T.A. Peterson, A.D. Flowerday Jan 1985

G85-762 Soybean Yield Loss Due To Hail Damage, Charles A. Shapiro, T.A. Peterson, A.D. Flowerday

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the methods used by the hail insurance industry to assess yield loss due to hail damage in soybeans. A hailstorm can cause yield losses in soybeans ranging from slight to total destruction of the crop. Extensive research has been conducted to accurately predict the effects of hail damage on soybean yields. Results from these studies are used by hail insurance companies to assess yield losses and consequent adjustment made to clients. The information in this NebGuide should be valuable to producers facing replant decisions, and may also be useful in cases of insect damage. Yield loss predictions ...


Heg85-202 Cash Flow Planning Form: For Household Expenses, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1985

Heg85-202 Cash Flow Planning Form: For Household Expenses, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides detailed step-by-step instructions for filling out a cash flow plan for household living expenses.

What Is Cash Flow Planning?

A cash flow plan shows the sources, amounts and timing of income and expenses. It shows when major expenses will come, when you will need credit and when you can plan for other major expenses. A cash flow plan is usually for one year, but it can be for any time period you choose.


G85-752 Strawberry Cultivars For Nebraska, William A. Gustafson Jan 1985

G85-752 Strawberry Cultivars For Nebraska, William A. Gustafson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The purpose of this NebGuide is to help you make the proper strawberry cultivar* (variety) selection for your area of the state and individual needs.

Proper strawberry cultivar selection is important for successful and satisfying results. Cultivar selection should be based on the family's intended use of the strawberry fruit (i.e. dessert use, freezing or preserves); on labor available to harvest the strawberries; and on available growing space.


G85-751 Thatch Prevention And Control (Revised July 1992), Roch E. Gaussoin, Terrance P. Riordan Jan 1985

G85-751 Thatch Prevention And Control (Revised July 1992), Roch E. Gaussoin, Terrance P. Riordan

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes how thatch accumulation damages turfgrass sites, and gives methods for removing accumulations and preventing their reoccurrence.

Thatch is a problem on many turfgrass sites. It consists of a tightly intermingled layer of dead and decaying turfgrass tissues derived from stems, roots and leaves.


G85-758 Protective Clothing And Equipment For Pesticide Appliactors (Revised September 2002), Larry D. Schulze, Clyde Ogg Jan 1985

G85-758 Protective Clothing And Equipment For Pesticide Appliactors (Revised September 2002), Larry D. Schulze, Clyde Ogg

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Pesticides are valuable pest management tools, and like any tool, they must be used carefully and responsibly. Minimizing exposure is an important first step toward reducing your risk of pesticide poisoning. The use of personal protective equipment (PPE) provides benefits to the applicator and is a visual expression of appropriate and legal pesticide use.\

Use all pesticides safely. Read the pesticide product label and comply with all directions. Failure to do so may not only subject you to state and/or federal penalties, but it also may place you, your family, and the environment at a greater risk of pesticide ...


G85-742 Dollar Spot Disease Of Turfgrass, John E. Watkins, Terrance P. Riordan Jan 1985

G85-742 Dollar Spot Disease Of Turfgrass, John E. Watkins, Terrance P. Riordan

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the symptoms and disease cycle of dollar spot, and provides recommendations for controlling this turfgrass disease.

Dollar spot of turfgrass is one of the most persistent diseases on golf courses in North America. All commonly grown turfgrasses in Nebraska may be attacked, but differences in susceptibility exist within cultivars of the various turf species. Presence of dollar spot in a well-managed lawn affects its aesthetic appearance and value, but usually does not threaten its survival. Lawns recover from dollar spot injury when conditions are favorable for vigorous, healthy growth.


G85-750 Terrace Systems For Nebraska, Elbert C. Dickey, Tom Hamer, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa Jan 1985

G85-750 Terrace Systems For Nebraska, Elbert C. Dickey, Tom Hamer, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes how different terrace shapes and systems can be used to reduce soil erosion losses on sloping fields. Loss of valuable topsoil to erosion prompted Nebraska farmers to build terraces as early as the 1920's. Current estimates indicate that water erodes as much as 140 million tons of soil annually from Nebraska's fields.


G85-748 Prevention And Control Of Swine Dysentery, Gerald E. Duhamel, Alex Hogg, Barbara E. Straw Jan 1985

G85-748 Prevention And Control Of Swine Dysentery, Gerald E. Duhamel, Alex Hogg, Barbara E. Straw

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the causes and symptoms of swine dysentery and offers management recommendations and treatment procedures for its prevention and control.

Swine dysentery is a highly contagious disease of growing and finishing pigs. First described in Indiana in 1921, it has been called black scours, bloody scours, and vibrionic dysentery.

Swine dysentery causes important financial losses because of reduced feed efficiency and lower weight gain, costs of medication and additional animal care, and death. Substantial costs may result from loss of sales of breeding stock, or depopulation when necessary. Serpula (Treponema) hyodysenteriae, a spiral bacterium, is the cause of ...


G85-747 Enteric Diseases (Scours) Of Swine, Alex Hogg, Alfonso Torres Jan 1985

G85-747 Enteric Diseases (Scours) Of Swine, Alex Hogg, Alfonso Torres

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes four major enteric diseases of swine, and discusses the cause, clinical signs, differential diagnosis, treatment, and control of each.

Four of the most important infectious enteric diseases of swine are reviewed in this publication. These include colibacillosis, transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE), rotavirus, and enterotoxemia (clostridial enteritis). A fifth disease, swine dysentery, is discussed in NebGuide G85-748.


G85-761 Feed Additives For Beef Cattle, Rick Stock, Terry L. Mader Jan 1985

G85-761 Feed Additives For Beef Cattle, Rick Stock, Terry L. Mader

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses feed additives, including how they work, feeding restrictions and feeding recommendations.

One of the best methods to reduce feed costs is through the use of feed additives. Their primary effects are to improve feed efficiency and/or daily gain. Some feed additives have secondary benefits which include reducing the incidence of acidosis, coccidiosis, and grain bloat, while others suppress estrus, reduce liver abscesses, or control foot rot problems.

Feed additives can be divided into five general categories: 1) ionophores; 2) antibiotics; 3) estrus suppressants; 4) buffers; and 5) others. Each feed additive has its own characteristics and ...


G85-759 Prominent Congenital Defects In Nebraska Beef Cattle, J. L. Johnson, H. W. Leipold, Donald B. Hudson Jan 1985

G85-759 Prominent Congenital Defects In Nebraska Beef Cattle, J. L. Johnson, H. W. Leipold, Donald B. Hudson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes congenital defects that affect the economic value of beef cattle, and provides recommendations on how to minimize them in breeding programs.

Congenital defects are abnormalities of structure or function present at birth. They may be caused by genetic or environmental factors, or a combination of both. The causes of many defects remain unknown.

Developmental defects may be lethal, semi-lethal, or compatible with life, causing very little effect or only aesthetic effect.

With the increasing use of artificial insemination (AI) in cattle, defects are no longer rare occurrences and are important collectively to the cattle industry. Congenital defects ...


G85-741 Estrous Synchronization For Beef Cattle, Gene H. Deutscher Jan 1985

G85-741 Estrous Synchronization For Beef Cattle, Gene H. Deutscher

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the potential benefits of estrous synchronization, how the products and programs work, and the results and costs involved. Estrous (heat) synchronization can help beef producers improve production efficiency and economic returns. Controlling estrus and ovulation in cycling females means breeding is completed in a short period of time. Instead of females being bred over a 21-day period, synchronization can shorten the breeding period to less than 5 days, depending on the program selected. The use of synchronization has great potential for improving beef production, but it requires good management for success. Producers should understand the advantages, as ...


G85-766 Retaining Ownership Of Calves Or Yearlings, Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1985

G85-766 Retaining Ownership Of Calves Or Yearlings, Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the advantages and disadvantages of retaining ownership of calves or yearlings until slaughter rather than selling them to a feeder.

Retaining ownership of weanlings or yearlings through to slaughter is a management and/or marketing option that can add to the profits of the calf producer or cattle grower. It is a way of expanding and diversifying the cattle enterprise. has the potential for greater profits for the rancher or grower than for the feeder who might buy them.

The cattle feeding industry exists because it has been a profitable business over the years. These profits have ...


G85-755 How To Set Goals For Your Breeding Program, Jeffrey F. Keown Jan 1985

G85-755 How To Set Goals For Your Breeding Program, Jeffrey F. Keown

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes how to determine which trait(s) to select for, and how multiple trait selection affects genetic progress.

Dairy producers are often concerned with placing emphasis on different production traits in their breeding program. Selecting on only economically important traits should be the objective of every producer. The use of artificial insemination (A.I.) sires is the most economical and productive way to increase the genetic potential of the herd.

A cow's record is a measure of her genetic potential, which is modified by the environment in which she is kept. Environmental factors that directly influence a ...


Heg85-204 'Til Death Do Us Part...From The Minute After, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1985

Heg85-204 'Til Death Do Us Part...From The Minute After, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide tells what to do after the death of a loved one, and how to plan to make your death easier for your survivors.

Death is a subject most people are uncomfortable discussing. But discussion and planning in advance of the death of someone close to you can save anguish -- and dollars.

This publication provides a checklist of what needs to be done immediately after a death, including a list of who needs to be notified, guidelines for decision-making immediately and sometime after death, sources of help for the survivors and suggestions on how to make your death easier ...


G85-760 Natural Air Corn Drying, Richard O. Pierce, Thomas L. Thompson Jan 1985

G85-760 Natural Air Corn Drying, Richard O. Pierce, Thomas L. Thompson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses factors affecting natural air corn drying system performance, and gives recommendations for bins filled over a one- to two-day period.

Natural air drying is an energy efficient drying method that is particularly well suited to Nebraska weather conditions. A high quality dried product, with little of the stress cracking or heat damage associated with high temperature drying, is an added attraction. However, good management practices must be followed to achieve satisfactory drying results.

A major concern with this method is overloading the bin with corn too wet to be dried without spoilage or deterioration, especially when the ...


G85-770 An Introduction To Grain Options On Futures Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen, Lynne A. Todd Jan 1985

G85-770 An Introduction To Grain Options On Futures Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen, Lynne A. Todd

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication, the third of six NebGuides on agricultural grain options, explains how to use futures options as a marketing tool.

A new agricultural marketing tool is available to farmers. A futures agricultural option is much like an insurance policy. It is a marketing alternative that gives farmers insurance against unfavorable price moves, but allows producers to take advantage of favorable price moves. To better understand terms used in this paper, please see NebGuide G85-768, Basic Terminology For Understanding Grain Options.


G85-769 Options Contract Specifications On Grain Futures Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen, Lynne A. Todd Jan 1985

G85-769 Options Contract Specifications On Grain Futures Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen, Lynne A. Todd

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication, the second of six NebGuides on agricultural grain options, explains specifications and uses of futures contracts for corn and soybean trading.

Before using options on agricultural futures contracts, it is essential to understand what constitutes an options contract.

This publication outlines contract specifications of corn and soybean options on corresponding futures contracts presently traded at the Chicago Board of Trade (CBT).

All contract specifications are discussed including: price quotations, maximum and minimum price fluctuation figures, and last trading day for an option. How strike prices and premium values are determined in relation to futures contract prices also will ...


G85-768 Basic Terminology For Understanding Grain Options, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1985

G85-768 Basic Terminology For Understanding Grain Options, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication, the first of six NebGuides on agricultural grain options, defines many of the terms commonly used in futures trading.

In order to properly understand examples and literature on options trading, it is imperative the reader understand the terminology used in trading grain options. The following list also includes terms commonly used in futures trading. These terms are included because the option is traded on an underlying futures contract position. It is an option on the futures market, not on the physical commodity itself. Therefore, a producer also needs a basic understanding of the futures market.


Ec85-414 Family Stress: Dealing With Blame, Virginia Molgaard Jan 1985

Ec85-414 Family Stress: Dealing With Blame, Virginia Molgaard

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

It's natural to look for someone or something to blame when things are not going well or when we are hurt or threatened. For example, persons threatened with the loss of the family farm may find their anguish eased a bit if they can find a place to put the blame.

This publication looks at how and why people blame each other, with emphasis on the current farm financial crisis. We will discover how to avoid blame that hurts us and the people we are blaming, and how to handle self-blame and being blamed by others.


Ec85-107 Nebraska Proso Variety Tests, 1985, Lenis Alton Nelson Jan 1985

Ec85-107 Nebraska Proso Variety Tests, 1985, Lenis Alton Nelson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety trials conducted by personnel of the Panhandle Research and Extension Center and the High Plains and Northwest Agriculture Laboratories. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agriculture Research Division and Cooperative Extension Service.