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Arts and Humanities

George Fox University

Faculty Publications - Portland Seminary

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Education

Conference Participation And Publishing (Chapter Eight Of Prepare, Succeed, Advance: A Guidebook For Getting A Ph.D. In Biblical Studies And Beyond), Nijay K. Gupta Jan 2011

Conference Participation And Publishing (Chapter Eight Of Prepare, Succeed, Advance: A Guidebook For Getting A Ph.D. In Biblical Studies And Beyond), Nijay K. Gupta

Faculty Publications - Portland Seminary

Two clear marks of a good scholar or doctoral student are published pieces of research (articles, essays, reviews, etc.) and active participation in academic conferences (presenter, chair, respondent, etc.). Especially for graduate students, the research experience can be very isolated and have a minimal impact without attention to such avenues of dialogue and interaction. Also, practically speaking, when the time comes for the job search, a demonstration of such activity often shows that the prospective professor is a real participant of and contributor to the field of biblical studies. We will begin by discussing how to get involved in conferences.


When The Cat’S Away, The Mice Keep Learning, Laura Simmons Jan 2010

When The Cat’S Away, The Mice Keep Learning, Laura Simmons

Faculty Publications - Portland Seminary

No abstract provided.


Teaching Biblical Studies Online, Steve Delamarter, Sandra L. Gravett, Daniel W. Ulrich, Richard W. Nysse, Sandra Hack Polaski Nov 2009

Teaching Biblical Studies Online, Steve Delamarter, Sandra L. Gravett, Daniel W. Ulrich, Richard W. Nysse, Sandra Hack Polaski

Faculty Publications - Portland Seminary

In this edited transcript of a panel at the Society of Biblical Literature (November 23, 2009, Boston, Massachusetts), five Bible scholars give brief presentations on various challenges and opportunities encountered when teaching academic biblical studies courses online in both undergraduate and theological education contexts. Each presentation is followed by questions from the audience and discussion. Topics include: a typology of different approaches to online teaching, advantages and disadvantages of online compared to face-to-face classrooms (for both students and faculty), opportunities for imaginative exercises online, the advantages of online threaded discussions, and the joys and pitfalls of bringing your course into ...


“The Grand Experiment:” Modeling Adult Learning With Adult-Ministry Students, Laura Simmons Jan 2007

“The Grand Experiment:” Modeling Adult Learning With Adult-Ministry Students, Laura Simmons

Faculty Publications - Portland Seminary

Adult-learning theory challenges faculty to adapt their teaching to certain characteristics of adult learners, including self-direction: if adults direct the bulk of their lives outside of school, so should they be permitted to direct their own educational experiences. To what extent is self-directed learning an optimal, or even realistic, methodology for seminary teaching? Does it matter what subjects we are teaching? This essay details an experiment with self-directed learning in a seminary ministry class: what worked; what might be altered before experimenting again with this teaching methodology; how it challenges our view of ourselves as faculty to teach in this ...


Reducing The Identity Crisis In Doctor Of Ministry Education, Charles J. Conniry Jan 2004

Reducing The Identity Crisis In Doctor Of Ministry Education, Charles J. Conniry

Faculty Publications - Portland Seminary

By ATS description, the Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.) degree properly belongs to the larger and more diverse family of degrees called “professional doctorate.” This article looks to the praxis-centered nature of professional doctorates as a means of addressing the identity crisis facing D.Min. education amidst the (ubiquitous) influences of the Wissenschaft model, whose hegemony in Western institutions over the last 150 years has worked to sustain an impassable rift between matters “academic” and “professional.” I begin by discussing the challenge that many classically trained theological educators face when teaching in programs that have a distinctively professional focus, such ...