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Full-Text Articles in Education

G96-1282 Drinking Water: Man-Made Chemicals, Paul J. Jasa, David L. Varner, Sharon Skipton, Delynn Hay Jan 1996

G96-1282 Drinking Water: Man-Made Chemicals, Paul J. Jasa, David L. Varner, Sharon Skipton, Delynn Hay

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses recommended practices to manage man-made chemicals in a domestic water supply. Many Nebraskans are concerned about the effects some of the man-made chemicals that have become part of everyday life may have on their water supply. As the name implies, these chemicals do not exist in nature but were made by man. With proper storage and use of these chemicals and with proper well construction, the risks to groundwater from the chemicals are low and the benefits are many. In some areas of the state, however, industrial solvents, manufacturing chemicals, ammunition wastes, pesticides and grain fumigants have ...


G96-1279 Drinking Water: Nitrate-Nitrogen (Revised November 1998), Paul J. Jasa, Sharon Skipton, David L. Varner, Delynn Hay Jan 1996

G96-1279 Drinking Water: Nitrate-Nitrogen (Revised November 1998), Paul J. Jasa, Sharon Skipton, David L. Varner, Delynn Hay

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses practices recommended to manage nitrate-nitrogen in a domestic water supply. Many Nebraskans have questions about the impact of nitrate in their drinking water. Water quality monitoring shows that nitrate is present in groundwater throughout much of Nebraska and that concentrations are increasing in some areas. Nitrogen is essential for all living things as it is an essential component of protein. Nitrogen exists in the environment in many forms and changes forms as it moves through the nitrogen cycle. However, excessive concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen in drinking water can be hazardous to health, especially for infants and pregnant women.


G96-1280 Drinking Water: Iron And Manganese, David L. Varner, Sharon Skipton, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa Jan 1996

G96-1280 Drinking Water: Iron And Manganese, David L. Varner, Sharon Skipton, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses recommended practices to manage iron and manganese in a domestic water supply. Iron and manganese are non-hazardous elements that can be a nuisance in a water supply. Iron and manganese are chemically similar and cause similar problems. Iron is the most frequent of the two contaminants in water supplies; manganese is typically found in iron-bearing water.


Cc96-396 Productcion Flexibility Contracts: Provisions, Implications And The Participation Decision, Roy Frederick, Bruce B. Johnson Jan 1996

Cc96-396 Productcion Flexibility Contracts: Provisions, Implications And The Participation Decision, Roy Frederick, Bruce B. Johnson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform (FAIR) Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-127) was signed into law by President Clinton on April 4, 1996. Most provisions of the new law, including the commodity provisions, will be effective for seven years, 1996-2002.

Unlike previous farm bills, provisions relating to commodity supports are grouped together under what is known as the Agricultural Market Transition Act (AMTA) program. Producers of seven commodities: corn, sorghum, barley, oats, wheat, rice and cotton must sign Productive Flexibility Contracts (PFCs) to participate in the AMTA. These seven commodities are referred to as "contract commodities."

This publication focuses ...


Ec96-822 Crop Revenue Coverage And Group Risk Plan--Additional Risk Managment Tools For Wheat Growers, Roger Selley, H. Douglas Jose Jan 1996

Ec96-822 Crop Revenue Coverage And Group Risk Plan--Additional Risk Managment Tools For Wheat Growers, Roger Selley, H. Douglas Jose

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This article examines two new multi-peril crop insurance offersings, Crop Revenue Coverage (CRC) and the Group Risk Plan (GRP), that may help wheat producers manage risk. First, bsaic crop-hail and Actual Production History (APH) coverage and the protection they offer will be compared. Then, additional protection offered by CTRC, which is avilable to Nebraska wheat growers on a pilot basis for 1997 with be outlined. Finally, GRP will be discussed, which will also be offered to Nebraska wheat growers for the first time for 1997 crop wheat.

The Federal Agricultural Improvemoent and Reform (FAIR) Act, better known as "Freedom to ...


Nf96-293 Joint Tenancy As An Estate Planning Tool, Paul H. Gessaman Jan 1996

Nf96-293 Joint Tenancy As An Estate Planning Tool, Paul H. Gessaman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Joint tenancy is a way of sharing ownership among two or more persons in which each joint tenant holds an equal and undivided interest in the property.


Nf96-291 Intestate Succession As An Estate Planning Tool, Paul H. Gessaman, J. David Aiken Jan 1996

Nf96-291 Intestate Succession As An Estate Planning Tool, Paul H. Gessaman, J. David Aiken

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

What happens if you die without a will? This NebFact has information on intestate succession.


Nf96-255 Setting Up Your Own Business: The "S" Corporation, Paul H. Gessaman Jan 1996

Nf96-255 Setting Up Your Own Business: The "S" Corporation, Paul H. Gessaman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is one in a series of NebFacts providing information on the principal forms of business organization used by small businesses. A broad overview of the advantages, limitations, and tax implications of each form of business organization is included. Titles in the series are listed at the end of the each NebFact.


Nf96-257 Setting Up Your Own Business: The Limited Liability Company, Paul H. Gessaman Jan 1996

Nf96-257 Setting Up Your Own Business: The Limited Liability Company, Paul H. Gessaman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This is one in a series of NebFacts providing information on the principle forms of business organization used by small businesses. A broad overview of the advantages, limitations, and tax implications of each form of business organization is included. Titles in the series are listed following the end of each document.


G96-1276 Creep Feeding Growing Horses, Kathleen P. Anderson, Pete G. Gibbs Jan 1996

G96-1276 Creep Feeding Growing Horses, Kathleen P. Anderson, Pete G. Gibbs

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the benefits and implications of creep feeding horses during the growing period of development.

Creep feeding, providing a place where foals can eat without interference from the mare and other horses, should be used if foals are to grow at optimum rates. Creep feeders are used to provide a nutritionally balanced, digestible concentrate to young nursing foals before weaning. The practice of creep feeding serves to supply nutrients beyond what a foal receives from mare's milk. And, creep feeding minimizes foals' intake of broodmare feed which often lacks the concentrated amounts of protein and minerals relative ...


G96-1278 Use Of Cooled Stallion Semen, Kathleen P. Anderson Jan 1996

G96-1278 Use Of Cooled Stallion Semen, Kathleen P. Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the benefits of using cooled stallion semen for horse breeding.

Using cooled, transported stallion semen is quickly becoming a viable breeding option for many horse producers. An increasing number of breed associations are recognizing the benefits of cooled semen and making it an option for producers. Mare owner's who are able to use cooled semen experience less expense related to breeding, if the program is properly conducted. Transporting cooled semen from the stud farm to the mare allows owners to reduce mare care and transportation costs. Furthermore, because the mare will remain on-the-farm, there is less ...


G96-1289 Diseases Of Home Garden Strawberries, John E. Watkins, David S. Wysong Jan 1996

G96-1289 Diseases Of Home Garden Strawberries, John E. Watkins, David S. Wysong

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide addresses on some of the common diseases affecting home garden strawberries in Nebraska and their control.

Strawberries are a favored fruit of home gardens. They have been adapted to a wide range of environmental conditions, but sometimes can be challenging to grow. Strawberry yields and fruit quality are influenced by interactions of environment, diseases, pests, and soil conditions.


G96-1308 Management Of Eastern Redcedar On Grasslands, John Ortmann, James L. Stubbendieck, George Pfeiffer, Robert A. Masters, Walter H. Schacht Jan 1996

G96-1308 Management Of Eastern Redcedar On Grasslands, John Ortmann, James L. Stubbendieck, George Pfeiffer, Robert A. Masters, Walter H. Schacht

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Developing an integrated control program including prescribed burning, herbicides, and cutting may be the best way to control eastern redcedar in Nebraska, according to recent research. Eastern redcedar is a serious threat to grassland productivity. Some control methods may be too expensive to use on grasslands, but in many cases, an integrated approach combining fire with more intensive follow-up methods will provide reasonable control at an acceptable cost.


G96-1293 Feedlot Abandonment Recommended Procedures, Richard K. Koelsch, Gerald R. Bodman Jan 1996

G96-1293 Feedlot Abandonment Recommended Procedures, Richard K. Koelsch, Gerald R. Bodman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

An abandoned animal feeding facility is a significant threat to the environment. Procedures to minimize the risk are discussed.

Feedlot abandonment occurs for various reasons, including economic and social changes, environmental concerns, consolidation for more cost effective management and operation, and modification of personal goals. Whether a feedlot is abandoned for a short time until some crisis passes, or permanently, steps are necessary to minimize the risk of environmental degradation.

Under both scenarios, an abandoned feedlot poses an immediate threat to surface and groundwater quality. The unused facility is also a potential nuisance and source of health problems for humans ...


Ec96-450 Let's Preserve: Meat, Poultry, Fish And Seafood, Julie A. Albrecht, Dennis E. Burson Jan 1996

Ec96-450 Let's Preserve: Meat, Poultry, Fish And Seafood, Julie A. Albrecht, Dennis E. Burson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Canning meat, poultry and seafood is one way to preserve food for the future. This publication provides accurate, up-to-date methods for safe canning of meat, poultry and seafood.

For general directions on how to can, refer to “Let’s Preserve: Canning Basics” EC90-434.


Nf96-274 Seed Sources For Commercial Vegetable Production, Laurie Hodges Jan 1996

Nf96-274 Seed Sources For Commercial Vegetable Production, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has addresses of distributors of seeds for commercial vegetable production.


Nf96-290 Irrigation Management Practices In Nebraska, William Miller, Ray Supalla, Benedict Juliano Jan 1996

Nf96-290 Irrigation Management Practices In Nebraska, William Miller, Ray Supalla, Benedict Juliano

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on a variety of new irrigation practices.


Nf96-268 Conducting A Prescribed Burn On Warm-Season Grass Crp Sites, Robert Stritzke Jan 1996

Nf96-268 Conducting A Prescribed Burn On Warm-Season Grass Crp Sites, Robert Stritzke

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has guidelines for prescribed burns on CRP sites.


Nf96-281 Soil Fertility Considerations For Land Coming Out Of Crp, Charles A. Shapiro, Gary W. Hergert, Melinda Mcvey Mccluskey Jan 1996

Nf96-281 Soil Fertility Considerations For Land Coming Out Of Crp, Charles A. Shapiro, Gary W. Hergert, Melinda Mcvey Mccluskey

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses soil nutrients and fertility for CRP farmland.


G96-1291 Housing For Horses Flooring For Stalls, Kathleen P. Anderson Jan 1996

G96-1291 Housing For Horses Flooring For Stalls, Kathleen P. Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses various types of flooring for use in horse stalls.

Stalled horses require much greater care, attention and labor. The availability of optimal ventilation with fresh clean air circulation is essential to healthy horses. Adequate ventilation reduces the presence of air contaminants such as dust, molds and irritating gases from decomposing manure.

Materials used for stall floors can greatly influence air quality, ease of stall maintenance and manure removal. Stall floors must be made of durable material which is not slippery, yet is absorbent, easy to clean, and resistant to pawing. Whatever the materials used, floors should require ...


G96-1307 Bioengineering For Hillslope, Streambank And Lakeshore Erosion Control, Thomas G. Franti Jan 1996

G96-1307 Bioengineering For Hillslope, Streambank And Lakeshore Erosion Control, Thomas G. Franti

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes bioengineering techniques for hillslope, streambank and lakeshore erosion control. Tips for a successful bioengineering installation and demonstration project are described. Soil erosion occurs whenever water meets land with enough force to move soil. Often this occurs along streambanks and lakeshores or where excess water flows over hillslopes. While streambank and hillslope erosion can be dramatic, especially after large rainfalls or floods, normal streamflows, excess runoff from urbanized areas and wave action along lakeshores continually erode soil. Erosion can be severe, as is the case in many man-made lakes, where shorelines are composed of easily erodible soil. Traditional ...


Ncr96-235 Feeding Ewes, Leon F. Bush, James Thompson Jan 1996

Ncr96-235 Feeding Ewes, Leon F. Bush, James Thompson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Proper feeding and year-roundmanagement of ewes are essential toprofitable sheep production. Feed forthe ewes can be 60 to 80% of the totalproduction costs of the sheepenterprise. Either excessive orinadequate nutrition is expensive. Toavoid these costly extremes you mustknow something of the nutritiverequirements of the ewe throughout theyear. That knowledge may make thedifference between profit and loss inyour operation.


Nf96-248 Factors Considered To Decide Nitrogen Application Rate, William Miller, Ray Supalla, Benedict Juliano Jan 1996

Nf96-248 Factors Considered To Decide Nitrogen Application Rate, William Miller, Ray Supalla, Benedict Juliano

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses nitrogen application among Nebraska farmers.


G96-1310 Ornamental Grasses In Nebraska Landscapes (Revised May 1999), Don Steinegger, John C. Fech, Dale T. Lindgren, Anne Streich Jan 1996

G96-1310 Ornamental Grasses In Nebraska Landscapes (Revised May 1999), Don Steinegger, John C. Fech, Dale T. Lindgren, Anne Streich

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the selection of and care for ornamental grasses.

Although grasses are an important component of Great Plains flora, Midwesterners have only recently incorporated them into landscape plantings. Many homeowners are acquiring plants such as ornamental grasses because they tolerate or even benefit from lower application rates of nitrogen and pesticides. Ornamental grasses tolerate drought, wetness, and fluctuating winter temperatures. They are resistant to most diseases and insect pests and require minimum inputs of fertilizer. Because of these characteristics they are useful to gardeners interested in a low-input or sustainable landscape.


Nf96-266 Lightning Safety, Steven J. Meyer, Robert D. Grisso Jan 1996

Nf96-266 Lightning Safety, Steven J. Meyer, Robert D. Grisso

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Lightning is the most frequent weather threat to personal safety during the thunderstorm season. This NebFact has information you should know about.


Nf96-260 Farmers' Use Of Crop Consultants In Nebraska, William Miller, Ray Supalla, Benedict Juliano Jan 1996

Nf96-260 Farmers' Use Of Crop Consultants In Nebraska, William Miller, Ray Supalla, Benedict Juliano

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact reports crop consulting survey taken in Nebraska during the 1994 crop year.


Nf96-283 Setting Up Your Own Business: Developing Your Marketing Plan And Sales Goals, Carol Thayer Jan 1996

Nf96-283 Setting Up Your Own Business: Developing Your Marketing Plan And Sales Goals, Carol Thayer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on preparing market plans and setting sales goals for your business.


Nf96-285 Setting Up Your Own Business: Selecting The Best Location For Your Business, Carol Thayer Jan 1996

Nf96-285 Setting Up Your Own Business: Selecting The Best Location For Your Business, Carol Thayer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact has information on finding the best location for your business.


G96-1292 Winter Care For Horses, Kathleen P. Anderson Jan 1996

G96-1292 Winter Care For Horses, Kathleen P. Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses energy requirements, feeding alterations, water requirements, hair and hoof implications, and shelter needs for horses during winter.

As the weather turns cold, many horses are ridden less and less. It is easy to become relaxed in a horse's daily care since they are not being used as often. However, horses still require much care and attention throughout the winter. Often, even greater attention is needed since there are no green pastures to graze or ponds and creeks to drink from.


Nf96-252 Controlling Feed Costs On Your Dairy Farm, Rick Grant Jan 1996

Nf96-252 Controlling Feed Costs On Your Dairy Farm, Rick Grant

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses ways to control feed costs on dairy farms.