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Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

2012

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Full-Text Articles in Education

It's Only Scary If It's About Me Or My Child: Different Responses To Emotional Appeals Targeting Asthma Awareness, Sandra C. Jones, Samantha L. Reis, Karen M. Larsen-Truong Jan 2012

It's Only Scary If It's About Me Or My Child: Different Responses To Emotional Appeals Targeting Asthma Awareness, Sandra C. Jones, Samantha L. Reis, Karen M. Larsen-Truong

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Abstract presented at Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, Adelaide, 3-5 Dec 2012


Knowledge About Language In The Australian Curriculum: English, Beverly Derewianka Jan 2012

Knowledge About Language In The Australian Curriculum: English, Beverly Derewianka

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Somewhat surprisingly, an explicit knowledge about language has been often absent from English curricula. The new Australian Curriculum: English (ACARA, 2012) has taken a fairly radical step in placing knowledge about language at the core of classroom practice, thereby raising the issue of an appropriate model of language to inform the Language Strand of the Curriculum. This paper will outline the rationale behind the Language Strand, and will then make explicit its underlying model of language. The paper thus provides a context for the ensuing articles in this Special Focus Issue of AJLL, which take up various concerns in relation ...


What Do Australian Consumers Think About Current Advertising Standards?, Sandra Carol Jones, Katherine Eagleton Jan 2012

What Do Australian Consumers Think About Current Advertising Standards?, Sandra Carol Jones, Katherine Eagleton

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

The concept of community standards is the cornerstone of advertising self-regulation in Australia. However, there is a dearth of research on current attitudes towards advertising and a virtual absence of such data in an Australian context. A questionnaire was developed to assess consumer attitudes towards advertising; respondents were 872 adults residing in New South Wales. We found high levels of concern regarding advertising standards in general and a consistent perception that advertising should not, for example, use coarse language or violent images, portray women or men as sex objects or show nudity, stereotype or make fun of groups of people ...


How To Think About Health Promotion Ethics, Stacy M. Carter, Alan Cribb, John P. Allegrante Jan 2012

How To Think About Health Promotion Ethics, Stacy M. Carter, Alan Cribb, John P. Allegrante

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Health promotion ethics is moral deliberation about health promotion and its practice. Although academics and practitioners have been writing about ethics, and especially values, in health promotion for decades, health promotion ethics is now regaining attention within the broader literature on public health ethics. Health promotion is difficult to define, and this has implications for health promotion ethics. Health promotion can be approached in two complementary ways: as a normative ideal, and as a practice. We consider the normative ideal of health promotion to be that aspect of public health practice that is particularly concerned with the equity of social ...


Australia’S Rich Talk About Saving The Environment; The Poor Bear The Burden Of Doing It, Lesley Head Jan 2012

Australia’S Rich Talk About Saving The Environment; The Poor Bear The Burden Of Doing It, Lesley Head

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Public housing tenants struggling with their bills will well understand NSW Community Services Minister Goward’s concern over the rising costs of nails and pots of paint. According to the minister, the carbon tax will push the price of household maintenance up; this is the reasoning behind an increase in public housing rents. But what’s fair about the state government passing its own carbon tax costs on to those least able to afford it?