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Full-Text Articles in Education

Learning First: A Research Agenda For Improving Learning In Low-Income Countries, Daniel A. Wagner, Katie M. Murphy, Haley De Korne Dec 2012

Learning First: A Research Agenda For Improving Learning In Low-Income Countries, Daniel A. Wagner, Katie M. Murphy, Haley De Korne

Working Papers (Literacy.org)

In 2011, the Center for Universal Education (CUE) at the Brookings Institution spearheaded the development of a common policy agenda on global education entitled A Global Compact on Learning: Taking Action on Education in Developing Countries. The report recommended a call to action for a diverse group of international stakeholders to come together to work toward achieving quality education for all. As a part of this larger policy agenda, CUE works with various scholars and organizations to address the many issues within the scope of the Global Compact on Learning.


Éire Higher Education: What American Can Learn From Ireland, Joni E. Finney, Laura W. Perna Dec 2012

Éire Higher Education: What American Can Learn From Ireland, Joni E. Finney, Laura W. Perna

GSE Publications

In July 2012, the executive doctoral class of 2013 from the University of Pennsylvania’s Higher Education Management Program in the Graduate School of Education conducted an in-depth comparative study of higher education in Ireland. The international study, an important component of the executive doctoral program, was structured to model research that we completed on the relationship between public policy and performance in five U.S. states: Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Texas and Washington (http://www.gse.upenn.edu/irhe/srp). This research provided the foundation for the students’ research. Students examined four performance areas related to Irish higher education: 1 ...


Learning From Nclb: School Responses To Accountability Pressure And Student Subgroup Performance, Elliot H Weinbaum, Michael J. Weiss, Jessica K. Beaver Sep 2012

Learning From Nclb: School Responses To Accountability Pressure And Student Subgroup Performance, Elliot H Weinbaum, Michael J. Weiss, Jessica K. Beaver

CPRE Policy Briefs

Much has been written in the last decade about the spotlight that the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) shines on schoolperformance. Proponents and opponents alike are quick to discuss the law’s rigid definitions of school performance— exemplified by the classification of schools as making Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) or not making AYP based largely on annual tests in reading and mathematics, disaggregating school performance by student subgroups, and requiring that all schools reach 100% proficiency. Yet for all its rigidity, the law has offered schools little guidance on how to make use of the performance data that the ...


In Search Of Leading Indicators In Education, Jonathan A. Supovitz, Ellen Foley, Jacob Mishook Jul 2012

In Search Of Leading Indicators In Education, Jonathan A. Supovitz, Ellen Foley, Jacob Mishook

CPRE Journal Articles

Data have long been considered a key factor in organizational decision-making (Simon, 1955; Lindblom & Cohen, 1979). Data offer perspective, guidance, and insights that inform policy and practice (Newell & Simon, 1972; Kennedy, 1984). Recently, education policymakers have invested in the use of data for organizational improvement in states and districts with such initiatives as Race to The Top (United States Department of Education, 2010) and the development of statewide longitudinal data systems (Institute for Education Sciences, 2010). These and other initiatives focus attention on how data can be used to foster learning and improvement. In other fields, including economics and business, much work has been done to identify leading indicators that predict organizational outcomes. In this paper ...


Prescriptions For Change: Can Ideas From Health Care Cure Higher Education's Ills?, Peter D. Eckel Jul 2012

Prescriptions For Change: Can Ideas From Health Care Cure Higher Education's Ills?, Peter D. Eckel

GSE Publications

Takeaways

Higher education shares some important characteristics with the health-care sector. Both are dominated by large cadres of highly educated staff, have complex bottom lines, are market-driven and strongly influenced by public policy, and are made up of value-driven organizations.

Health care appears to be one or two decades ahead of higher education in its transformation into an industry that is more outcomes-based, cost- and price-sensitive, and responsive to customer needs.

Some of the insights that higher education can gain from health care include: Flawed systems generate flawed results; the focus should be on needs, costs, and undervalued services; wisdom ...


What Should Be Learned From Learning Assessments?, Daniel A. Wagner Mar 2012

What Should Be Learned From Learning Assessments?, Daniel A. Wagner

Journal Articles (Literacy.org)

Learning assessments have grown increasingly important as policy makers and other educational consumers (agencies, schools, communities, parents, individuals, etc.) have sought to understand what is (and isn’t) learned as a function of information inputs. Increasingly, ministers of education are no longer satisfied with who is attending school, but also how well what is being taught is learned, and perhaps how well the minister is doing relative to ministers in other countries. Even at the individual level, in both wealthy and poor countries, both parents and children want to know whether or not they will succeed in school, or in ...


From Automation Joy To Perseverance In Engineering: How Parents Conceptualize The Impact Of Robotics On Their Children, Rashmi Kumar Jan 2012

From Automation Joy To Perseverance In Engineering: How Parents Conceptualize The Impact Of Robotics On Their Children, Rashmi Kumar

VPUL Works

The question guiding this research was, in what ways do parents perceive the impact of robotics in advancing their children’s interest in knowledge of and learning about science and engineering. This case study draws on communities of practice and activity theory to explore the lenses through which parents conceptualize the attributes of robotics towards increasing their children’s preparation and interest for engineering. The study revealed that parents perceive the acquisition of pertinent knowledge and skills as outcomes of interdisciplinary and authentic learning opportunities generated through series of goal directed activities. In addition, it was found that parents viewed ...