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Other Education

2010

Johnson & Wales University

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

The Relationship Of Personality Traits To Satisfaction With The Team: A Study Of Interdisciplinary Teacher Teams In Rhode Island Middle Schools, Michele D. Humbyrd, Robert K. Gable Oct 2010

The Relationship Of Personality Traits To Satisfaction With The Team: A Study Of Interdisciplinary Teacher Teams In Rhode Island Middle Schools, Michele D. Humbyrd, Robert K. Gable

Teacher Education

Shared practice in schools has emerged; teachers are moving from isolation to team collaboration where personality traits could be related to quality interactions. Team personality traits and team satisfaction were examined. A survey and interview approach was used for N = 244 full-time teachers from N = 49 interdisciplinary teams at N = 7 middle schools. Descriptive, correlational, multiple regression analyses and coded themes about team members’ personalities and interactions were employed. No significant relationships were found between the BFI traits and Satisfaction with the Team. Team-level analysis indicated a significant negative correlation between Satisfaction with theTeam and Extraversion and Agreeableness. Qualitative data ...


Teenagers’ Reasons For Listening To Music And The Students’ Perception Of The Effects Of Listening When Completing School Assignments, Jennifer Adriano, Thomas Dipaola Apr 2010

Teenagers’ Reasons For Listening To Music And The Students’ Perception Of The Effects Of Listening When Completing School Assignments, Jennifer Adriano, Thomas Dipaola

K-12 Education

Music is a significant part of our lives. People listen to music on the radio at home and in their car; they watch music videos on television or hand held technology; they buy CDs or download music; and they attend concerts. People also hear music in stores, restaurants, sporting events, and doctors’ offices (Schellenberg, Peretz, & Vieillard, 2008). Music is very important to many adolescents and they spend a considerable amount of their time listening to music. One study with N = 2,465 adolescents ages 13 and 14 found that participants listened to music for an average of 2.45 hours per day (North, Hargreaves, & O’Neill, 2000). Music has become a personal accompaniment in many teenagers’ lives because of the availability and popularity of personal music listening devices. In 2009, Jaffray released the results from the 18th semi-annual survey, “taking stock with teens.” The team of researchers surveyed approximately N = 1,200 students, with an average age of 16.3, in 12 cities across the United States and received an additional N = 10,000 online responses. The results showed that 92% of teenagers reported owning a personal music player. As a result of the popularity of these players, music has become individualized, especially for teenagers. It is also considered one of the influences in the development and identity of adolescents (North & Hargreaves, 1999). However, “What is music? To many, ‘music’ can only mean the great masters – Beethoven, Debussy, and 3 Mozart. To others, ‘music’ is Busta Rhymes, Dr. Dre, and Moby” (Levitin, 2006, p.1). Clearly, music is an important aspect in many people’s lives, especially teenagers but research on this topic is limited. In particular, there is minimal research about the effects of “popular” background music on academic tasks. Researchers have been investigating students’ homework environment and the subsequent effects on homework performance for decades (Patton, Stinard, & Routh, 1983; Pool, Koolstra, & van der Voort, 2003; Pool, van der Voort, Beentjes, & Koolstra, 2000). In 1983, Patton, Stinard, and Routh asked the question, “where do children study,” and their results influenced many future studies. The researchers surveyed N = 387 students in Grades 5-9 about his or her homework environment when reading or completing written or mathematic assignments. The study showed that most students preferred a quiet environment when reading but completed mathematic and written assignments in the presence of music or the television. Students rated the effects of different stimulations while completing academic tasks and indicated that the television was considered a moderate distracter but the students reported the music as beneficial. Patton, Stinard, and Routh’s study showed that students read in a quiet setting but then changed their environment for different homework tasks; thus showing an awareness of what they feel is their best homework environment and a level of maturity by the students in making that choice. In more recent years, many of the studies examining the effects of background ...


Knowledge And Understanding Of The 21st Century Skills Through Educator Externships: Programs In Southern New England, Lizann R. Gibson, Gary G. Gray Jan 2010

Knowledge And Understanding Of The 21st Century Skills Through Educator Externships: Programs In Southern New England, Lizann R. Gibson, Gary G. Gray

K-12 Education

This study utilized the body of knowledge that exists on emergent workforce development issues, the characteristics of the Millennial generation as they relate to the increasingly high drop-outs rates and the globalization of the workplace, the need for 21st Century Skills to be incorporated into the K-12 curriculum, and an authentic professional development experience for teachers, the educator externship.

The Educator Externship experience is a statistically viable method of authentic professional development to help teachers provide the educational experience that their students, the Millennial generation, are demanding.

The data from this study statistically showed that the Educator Externship Experience as ...