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Life Sciences

Environment

2002

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

G02-1463 Indoor Air Qualitiy: Know The Asthma Triggers In The Home, Shirley Niemeyer, Sharon Skipton Jan 2002

G02-1463 Indoor Air Qualitiy: Know The Asthma Triggers In The Home, Shirley Niemeyer, Sharon Skipton

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication discusses asthma triggers sometimes found in the home and possible solutions. It is intended to help manage and reduce possible indoor triggers. Medical professionals should be consulted first and their recommendations followed.

Asthma, a serious lung disease, is the leading cause of long-term illness in children. Asthma affects 112,100 Nebraskans, of whom 75,000 are adults, and 37,100 are youth (1998), and is on the rise. While the U.S. death rate has decreased since 1993, Nebraska's rate has increased to second highest in the nation. The highest death rate is among blacks, females and ...


Nf02-520 Fungicide Spray Schedule For Home Garden Small Fruits, John E. Watkins, Jernnifer L. Chaky Jan 2002

Nf02-520 Fungicide Spray Schedule For Home Garden Small Fruits, John E. Watkins, Jernnifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Home grown strawberries, raspberries and grapes are a rewarding experience for the gardener as well as the consumer of the fresh fruits and jellies. If properly managed, these crops can be a source of enjoyment for years. To be successful, however, the home gardener must develop a sound integrated pest management (IPM) approach to controlling diseases and insect pests. A good IPM program makes use of cultural, varietal and chemical means of preventing or reducing disease losses.

This NebFact discusses which fungicides to use for which disease of small garden fruits and provides recommendations for a fungicide treatment schedule.


G02-1444 Medical Sharps Disposal From Livestock Operations, Dicky D. Griffin, Marilyn Buhman Jan 2002

G02-1444 Medical Sharps Disposal From Livestock Operations, Dicky D. Griffin, Marilyn Buhman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide explains how to properly dispose of medical sharps (hypodermic needles and scalpel blades) for livestock operations. Understanding this is critical for employee safety and environmental stewardship.

Disposing livestock medical sharps presents two concerns. The first is human safety. Handling livestock medical sharps presents a potential employee safety concern and as such is addressed within the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations. Second, the disposal of livestock medical sharps presents an environmental hazard and as such is addressed within the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations.