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Full-Text Articles in Education

How Do We Know There Is A Population-Environment Problem?, Peter J. Taylor Mar 2000

How Do We Know There Is A Population-Environment Problem?, Peter J. Taylor

Working Papers on Science in a Changing World

Five fictional friends of the author have agreed to meet and talk, hoping that he was right when he claimed that discussion crossing the usual boundaries of their fields would enrich their different inquiries and concerns. Ecolo, a natural and human ecologist, breaks the ice. He wants to marshall scientific knowledge to persuade others of the seriousness of the population problem. He is questioned by Philoso, whose philosophical bent leads her to observe the models that people use and to ask how they support the claims they make. In turn, the other three join in: Activo, an activist who is ...


Ec00-1879 Sorghum Ergot In The Northern Great Plains, Jim Stack Jan 2000

Ec00-1879 Sorghum Ergot In The Northern Great Plains, Jim Stack

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sorghum is grown throughout Nebraska on approximately 0.6 million acres of land. It is grown as a forage crop as well as a grain crop. There is no significant commercial seed production in Nebraska. Grain sorghum is used domestically as livestock feed, in ethanol production, and to a limited extent as a food crop.

Grain sorghum is also exported to several countries. All sorghum hybrids (grain and forage) are susceptible to ergot disease. Ergot is a disease that impacts sorghum production directly by infecting unfertilized flowers and preventing seed development. Ergot also impacts sorghum production indirectly. Affected fields with ...


G00-1778 Field Windbreaks, James R. Brandle, Laurie Hodges Jan 2000

G00-1778 Field Windbreaks, James R. Brandle, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

gricultural producers face many challenges as they try to balance efficient production systems with increasing environmental demands. For these systems to be successful, they must optimize the balance between inputs and final production. Field windbreaks are one way to increase yields while at the same time reducing inputs and improving both environmental quality and production efficiency. Windbreaks reduce wind speed and alter the microclimate in sheltered areas. Field windbreaks reduce wind erosion and the damage to crops caused by wind-blown soil. They improve water use efficiency, reduce risks associated with drought, and manage blowing snow.

Field windbreaks provide positive economic ...