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Life Sciences

2002

Management

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec02-1550 Nebraska Management Guide For Arthropod Pests Of Livestock And Horses, John B. Campbell Jan 2002

Ec02-1550 Nebraska Management Guide For Arthropod Pests Of Livestock And Horses, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Understanding the differences in insecticide formulations is important to selecting the right one for the job. This publication discusses the different insecticides and ways of treating your animals. They include: dusts, emulsifiable concentrates, emulsifiable livestock insecticides, flowables (thick fluids mixed with water), soluble powders, wettable powders, and water dispersible liquids. Insecticides listed in this publication are considered safe when used according to label directions.


G02-1466 Determining The Need To Fertilize Landscape Trees And Shrubs (Revised March 2004), Scott J. Dewald, Steven D. Rasmussen, Charles A. Shapiro, Scott J. Josiah Jan 2002

G02-1466 Determining The Need To Fertilize Landscape Trees And Shrubs (Revised March 2004), Scott J. Dewald, Steven D. Rasmussen, Charles A. Shapiro, Scott J. Josiah

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Most Nebraska soils are fertile enough to support tree and shrub growth without applying fertilizer. However, when woody plants exhibit poor growth or reduced vigor, yet have had adequate moisture and are not experiencing pest problems or other environmental limitations, the proper applicatin of fertilizer may be necessary. This NebGuide explains how to determine if fertilization of established trees and shrubs is required and how to apply the needed amount.


Nf02-551 Management Of Blister Beetles In Alfalfa, John B. Campbell, Steve Ensley Jan 2002

Nf02-551 Management Of Blister Beetles In Alfalfa, John B. Campbell, Steve Ensley

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Adult blister beetles (Epicauta spp.) tend to be gregarious, and several may be observed feeding on the same flowering plant such as alfalfa or sometimes soybeans, goldenrod or occasionally musk thistle, They feed primarily on leaves and flowers but do little damage to crops.

This NebFact discusses the life cycle, damage, treatment, and prevention avoidance of the blister beetle here in Nebraska.


G02-1465 Crop Water Use In Western Nebraska, C. Dean Yonts Jan 2002

G02-1465 Crop Water Use In Western Nebraska, C. Dean Yonts

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Whether your water originates from the ground or the river, water for irrigation is becoming limited due to diminishing supplies and increasing environmental needs. In many areas of the Nebraska Panhandle, groundwater levels are dropping due to over development of the aquifers. In river valleys, water shortages occur during periods of drought.

This NebGuide provides information on average weekly crop water use values for the major crops grown in western Nebraska. The information is best used for planning decisions before the season begins or for long term irrigation system planning.


Nf02-518 Management Of Phytophthora Diseases Of Soybeans, Loren J. Giesler, Jane A. Christensen, Christopher M. Zwiener Jan 2002

Nf02-518 Management Of Phytophthora Diseases Of Soybeans, Loren J. Giesler, Jane A. Christensen, Christopher M. Zwiener

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Phythophthora diseases of soybean, caused by Phytophthora sojae, are present wherever soybeans are grown in Nebraska. The pathogen survives primarily as "resting" spores in the soil or in association with infested crop debris. Symptoms associated with Phytophthora sojae, infections include seed rots, pre- and post-emergence dampin goff of seedlings and stem rot of plants at various growth stages.

Knowledge of the races present in the state and how varieties with different resistance genes have performed in a grower's field is critical to variety selection for maximum profitability.


Nf02-519 Fungicide Spray Schedule For Home Garden Tree Fruits, Jennifer L. Chaky, John E. Watkins Jan 2002

Nf02-519 Fungicide Spray Schedule For Home Garden Tree Fruits, Jennifer L. Chaky, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Growing tree fruits in the home garden can be a very enjoyable experience, and with proper management, can provide many years of enjoyment. Success in growing tree frutis depends on following an approach known as integrated pest management, or IPM. In this management program, variety selection, cultural practices and chemical means are used to prevent or reduce losses due to diseases or insects.

This NebFact covers cultural practices, variety selection, the control of disease problems, and how to correctly use chemical controls for a safer environment.