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Higher Education Administration

2001

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Articles 1 - 26 of 26

Full-Text Articles in Education

“Expressive Technology”: Multimedia Projects In Honors Courses, Patricia Worrall Oct 2001

“Expressive Technology”: Multimedia Projects In Honors Courses, Patricia Worrall

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

“How might one build a creative arts component . . . into a course not otherwise involved with the creative arts?” was one of the questions Rusty Rushton posed in his Call for Papers for the volume titled “Honors and the Creative Arts.” His question caught my attention. The NCHC’s Mission Statement calls upon us as teachers of Honors courses “to enhance opportunities (academic, cultural, and social) responsive to educational needs of highly able and/or exceptionally motivated undergraduate students.” On the other hand, however, we may feel, as Gail E. Hawisher and Cynthia L. Selfe clearly do, that “we often find ...


An Architect’S Foray Into Honors, Betsy West Oct 2001

An Architect’S Foray Into Honors, Betsy West

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

In universities across the country, faculty struggle with the task of bringing creative arts education into the Honors curriculum. I am, therefore, only one of many who have attempted this, and as an Architecture faculty member I can only truly speak to the introduction of visual material and visual awareness. In the course of teaching an Honors seminar, however, I have come to believe that there are, indeed, strategies which make teaching creative arts in an Honors curriculum both possible and enjoyable. I also believe it can be done in such a way as to make the information both accessible ...


Honors Students In The Creative Writing Classroom: Sequence And Community, Margaret Szumowski Oct 2001

Honors Students In The Creative Writing Classroom: Sequence And Community, Margaret Szumowski

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

It is the end of the semester here at Gasoline Alley in Springfield, Massachusetts, and the creative writing students are about to give their readings. It is an artsy setting, the SEE café and gallery. Some of the students who will read today hope to transfer into the engineering program at the University of Massachusetts. They are computer-wise, bright students. Others are candidates for the nursing program. Three women hope to transfer to Mt. Holyoke or Smith. But here they are today, reading their poems at a gallery they have never visited before, with African masks all around them. The ...


Seeing The World Anew: Creative Arts In The Honors Curriculum, Sara Sanders Oct 2001

Seeing The World Anew: Creative Arts In The Honors Curriculum, Sara Sanders

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

In the sixteen-year history of the Honors Program at Coastal Carolina University, some three hundred students have completed the program. We have graduated only two fine arts majors, and we currently have a student who is double majoring in art and marine science. Most of our students are science majors. In order to be invited into the honors program, students have to be excellent in verbal and analytical skills, but research on multiple intelligences (Gardner, Multiple) has shown us that those are only two of many ways to make sense of the world. Honors students are usually skilled learners in ...


The Evolution Of Aesthetic Response In Honors Students, Tammy Ostrander Oct 2001

The Evolution Of Aesthetic Response In Honors Students, Tammy Ostrander

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

In many college courses, the goal of teaching is to convey content so that the students in the course can become literate in a certain discipline. In such courses, the students learn information with which to answer questions appropriate to the field of study. In a course on the arts, however, the goal may not be answering the questions, but asking them. Due to the philosophical nature of the question ‘What is Art?’ for example, faculty members teaching a course on the arts need to realize that students may never fully grasp the concept of what art is. A nonetheless ...


Bringing Imagination Into The Community Through A Poetry-Writing Honors Course, Diann Mccabe Oct 2001

Bringing Imagination Into The Community Through A Poetry-Writing Honors Course, Diann Mccabe

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

For the past few years, I have taught an honors course here at Southwest Texas State University called “Teaching Poetry to Children” that trains ten honors students to teach poetry writing workshops at Crockett Elementary School in San Marcos, Texas twice a week for eight weeks. After a few weeks of immersion in Kenneth Koch’s books Rose, Where Did You Get that Red? Teaching Great Poetry to Children and Wishes, Lies, and Dreams: Teaching Young Children to Write Poetry and equipped with favorite poems from several different cultural traditions (American, British, Spanish, Chinese, and African among them), our ten ...


Could Aristotle Teach The Honors Courses I Envision? Theory And Practice In The Arts, L. Luis Lopez Oct 2001

Could Aristotle Teach The Honors Courses I Envision? Theory And Practice In The Arts, L. Luis Lopez

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

In general, art survey and art history courses focus on the influence of culture on art and art on culture, and the changes in art from century to century or from any period to any period. When an art survey or art history section is taught at the honors level, what results is a class with fewer students moving at a faster pace so more material can be covered, the introduction of discussion into what is usually a lecture class, and a more concentrated study of the material presented. This, of course, is the case for many general education courses ...


Media Literacy And Liberation: Honors Students As Prophetic Artists And Critics, Page R. Laws Oct 2001

Media Literacy And Liberation: Honors Students As Prophetic Artists And Critics, Page R. Laws

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Kulturkritiker Cornel West focuses on artists and critics of color in the statement above, and his words are therefore particularly pertinent to students at my home institution, Norfolk State University, the fifth-largest historically black university in the U.S. His refreshing radicalism, however, can serve as a universal call to arm all students, and especially honors students, with the weapons of media literacy. Empowering students as makers and critics of film and video art serves the most vital interests of interdisciplinary honors education, and this essay explores some ways of training both types of “cultural workers,” i.e. student filmmakers ...


“The Play’S The Thing”: Theater Arts And Liberal Learning, Margaret Franson Oct 2001

“The Play’S The Thing”: Theater Arts And Liberal Learning, Margaret Franson

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

The recurrent disposition to view undergraduate learning as most valuable when it prepares students for specific careers by equipping them with the particular “skill sets” of their chosen occupations has led invariably to a number of unfortunate consequences. Foremost among them has been the distressing tendency to comprehend and design even music, theater, and dance activities exclusively as pre-professional training exercises. This over-reverence for technique often weakens the inherent powers of the performing arts to deepen self-knowledge, to develop the virtues most useful in the pursuit of truth, to build community, to enhance appreciation for the ways in which texts ...


When Austen’S Heroines Meet: A Play In One Act, Stephanie Renee Fosnight Oct 2001

When Austen’S Heroines Meet: A Play In One Act, Stephanie Renee Fosnight

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

SETTING: The ladies’ parlour of a wayside inn in ——shire, England. Sometime in the early 1800s. A sofa, three chairs and two small tables are grouped companionably before the upstage fireplace with mantel. A door stage right leads to the garden and a door to the left leads into the inn.
NOTE: During the dream sequences, the major character plays an older version of herself while the other ladies don small accessories and play the other characters in the dream. The furniture is slightly rearranged to suggest a different room.


Editorial Matter For Volume 2, Number 2, Ada Long, Dail Mullins, Rusty Rushton Oct 2001

Editorial Matter For Volume 2, Number 2, Ada Long, Dail Mullins, Rusty Rushton

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Editorial Policy
Contents
Call for Papers
Submission Guidelines
Dedication
Editor's Introduction, Ada Long
About the Authors


Jesters Freed From Their Jack-In-The-Boxes: Or Springing Creativity Loose From Traditionally Entrenched Honors Students, Leslie Donovan Oct 2001

Jesters Freed From Their Jack-In-The-Boxes: Or Springing Creativity Loose From Traditionally Entrenched Honors Students, Leslie Donovan

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Many people in our society manage adequately all their lives without ever flexing a creative muscle. Yet, most of us involved in Honors education expect and want more for our students. We know that those who resist using creativity in their lives and work will be unlikely to push beyond the traditional boundaries of scholastic analysis. Further, we reason that, by operating beyond such boundaries, our students may someday find a cure for cancer, recognize signs marking sentient life on other planets, or move people to leave hatred of differences behind. We realize that such dreams are possible only if ...


Journal Of The National Collegiate Honors Council -- Volume 2, No. 2 -- Complete Issue Oct 2001

Journal Of The National Collegiate Honors Council -- Volume 2, No. 2 -- Complete Issue

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

CONTENTS
Call for Papers
Submissions Guidelines
Dedication
Editor’s Introduction, Rusty Rushton

TEACHING THE CREATIVE ARTS
An Architect’s Foray Into Honors, Betsy West
“The Play’s the Thing”: Theater Arts and Liberal Learning, Margaret Franson
Media Literacy and Liberation: Honors Students as Prophetic Artists and Critics Page R. Laws
Bringing Imagination into the Community Through a Poetry-Writing Honors Course, Diann A. McCabe
Seeing the World Anew: Creative Arts in the Honors Curriculum, Sara L. Sanders and Janet S. Files
Honors Students in the Creative Writing Classroom: Sequence and Community Margaret C. Szumowski

SPLICING THE CREATIVE ARTS INTO NON-ARTS COURSES ...


Honors And The Creative Arts In Nursing: Music Therapy To Decrease Anxiety In Critical Care Patients, Ellen Buckner, Cynthia Leach-Fuller Oct 2001

Honors And The Creative Arts In Nursing: Music Therapy To Decrease Anxiety In Critical Care Patients, Ellen Buckner, Cynthia Leach-Fuller

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

In nursing education, we strive for a delicate balance between the science and the art of nursing. While curricular objectives address standards of practice assuring competencies in pathophysiology, pharmacology, clinical fundamentals, medical nursing, surgical nursing, and other domains of health science, we also purport to produce a practitioner with sensitivity and compassion. The honors in nursing option, begun in 2000 at UAB, has allowed us to push the creative side of nursing to a higher level. Honors students have clearly taken this opportunity with enthusiasm. Our first nursing honors graduate, Ms. Cynthia Leach-Fuller, investigated an application of music therapy in ...


Telling Tales Out Of School: Academic Novels And Memoirs By Women, Betty Krasne Jul 2001

Telling Tales Out Of School: Academic Novels And Memoirs By Women, Betty Krasne

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

The following article has some of the attributes of a relic. It was originally written for the old Forum for Honors, shortly before its demise. Therefore, the books and issues it discusses take on a different perspective now that the reborn Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council has offered to publish those articles stranded by the former publication's termination.


Journal Of The National Collegiate Honors Council -- Volume 2, No. 1 -- Complete Issue Apr 2001

Journal Of The National Collegiate Honors Council -- Volume 2, No. 1 -- Complete Issue

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

CONTENTS

Call for Papers
Submission Guidelines :
Dedication
Editor's Introduction, Ada Long

EDUCATIONAL TRANSITIONS
Full Circle: The Reappearance of Privilege and Responsibility in American Higher Education, George Mariz
Telling Tales Out of School: Academic Novels and Memoirs by Women, Betty Krasne
Helping Honors Students Improve Critical Thinking, Julie Fisher Robertson and Donna Rane-Szostak
Science Literacy and the Undergraduate Science Curriculum: Is It Time To Try Something Different?, Dail Mullins

FORUM ON HONORS AND HIGHER EDUCATION
Cultivating: Some Thoughts on the NCHC's Future, Samuel Schuman
Further Thoughts on the Future of the NCHC, Joan Digby
A Small Step, Len Zane ...


Science Literacy And The Undergraduate Science Curriculum: Is It Time To Try Something Different?, Dail Mullins Apr 2001

Science Literacy And The Undergraduate Science Curriculum: Is It Time To Try Something Different?, Dail Mullins

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

I had a very disturbing experience a few months ago---Dne might almost call it a crisis of faith-while leafing through the financial pages of my daily newspaper. Confronted with column after column of virtually indecipherable NASDAQ, NYSE and AMEX stock quotations-and even more nonplussed by articles which made reference to such things as "put" and "call" options, small cap growth funds, and companies taking "poison pills" to avoid a hostile takeover-I realized in a flash of depressing insight that I was one of this nation's economic illiterates.


Full Circle: The Reappearance Of Privilege And Responsibility In American Higher Education, George Mariz Apr 2001

Full Circle: The Reappearance Of Privilege And Responsibility In American Higher Education, George Mariz

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Anyone familiar with current initiatives in higher education is well aware of the increasing emphasis on public service as a component of an undergraduate degree, and the rhetoric of contemporary dialogues might well lead one to believe that public service is an entirely new concept in American higher education. This essay offers a different view. Far from being new, public service in one form or another was a significant element of the college curriculum from the seventeenth century until the Civil War. The reappearance of this notion, I believe, signals a rebirth, but at the same time marks a departure ...


Editorial Matter For Volume 2, Number 1, Ada Long, Dail Mullins, Rusty Rushton Apr 2001

Editorial Matter For Volume 2, Number 1, Ada Long, Dail Mullins, Rusty Rushton

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Editorial Policy
Contents
Call for Papers
Submission Guidelines
Dedication
Editor’s Introduction, Dail Mullins
About the Authors


Further Thoughts On The Future Of Nchc, Joan Digby Apr 2001

Further Thoughts On The Future Of Nchc, Joan Digby

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

I was one of the panelists with Sam Schuman in the final plenary session at the Fall 2000 conference. Since I was the outgoing president of NCHC, and had indeed gone out by the time we spoke to the audience that Sunday morning, I had already spent considerable time thinking about the future of our organization. Nevertheless, Sam's call to arms as the defenders of undergraduate excellence---clear and resonant-was the most important message of the day.


Cultivating Too, Bernice Braid Apr 2001

Cultivating Too, Bernice Braid

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

In his plenary comments at NCHC's Washington conference (2000), Sam Schuman raised topics of compelling interest to us all: the role of honors and of the NCHC in the context of attitudinal matters in higher education generally, as he sees them. These topics are important to all of us. What individual honors programs actually do, these days, and what NCHC does for them and for honors are deeply important issues as we begin a new millennium. My response is a personal attempt to frame the issues Sam has raised, consider the same span of time he cites-the final thirty ...


A Small Step, Len Zane Apr 2001

A Small Step, Len Zane

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Sam Schuman's essay, "Cultivating: Some Thoughts on NCHC's Future'" challenges NCHC and honors practitioners to expand the role of honors on campus so that honors may become the locus of a more generalized push for excellence in higher education. There is a symmetry in Sam's call since many people's first involvement with honors, as students, faculty, or administrators, was likely catalyzed by the general disinterest in excellence that pervades much of what passes for education on our campuses. The symmetry arises from going full circle, from the larger university to the safe haven of honors education ...


It's Ten O'Clock. Do You Know Where Your Students Are?, Stephen Wainscott Apr 2001

It's Ten O'Clock. Do You Know Where Your Students Are?, Stephen Wainscott

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Sam Schuman's essay urging us to promote excellence broadly and not just within our programs comes on the eve of Clemson's SACS reaccreditation site visit next year. His observations remind me that I need to get busy. Thanks a lot, Sam.

Like scores of others involved in the reaccreditation process, I will do my part by contributing to, but not chairing, the Honors Program's self-study. It will feature lots of golly-gee-whiz graphs and charts. I may toss in a colorful pie chart showing honors students from all over the country and many foreign countries, including Texas. The ...


Cultivating: Some Thoughts On Nchc's Future, Samuel Schuman Apr 2001

Cultivating: Some Thoughts On Nchc's Future, Samuel Schuman

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

At the Fall, 2000, meeting of the NCHC in Washington, DC, the closing plenary session focused on "The Future of NCHC." It was a worthwhile session, ably organized and chaired by Ada Long, in which several thoughtful participants made interesting and valuable observations and suggestions. Unfortunately, the plenary session was scheduled for late in the morning of the last day of the meeting, so many conference attendees faced the choice of concentrating on NCHC's future ... or their own. Reasonably enough, most opted for the latter by departing the meeting, hotel and city prior to the panel presentation.


Helping Honors Students Improve Critical Thinking, Julie Fisher Robertson, Donna Rane-Szostak Apr 2001

Helping Honors Students Improve Critical Thinking, Julie Fisher Robertson, Donna Rane-Szostak

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Interest in critical thinking (CT) has increased dramatically in the past 25 years. This represents a growing awareness that high school and college graduates often do not have the necessary CT skills to meet the challenges of a changing world. Research shows that college students who take critical thinking courses report their ability to think critically has greatly improved (Block, 1985; Rubinstein, 1980; Rubinstein & Firstenberg, 1987). The preponderance of evidence from assessment studies using control groups indicates that "gains are most pronounced when instruction is specifically designed for the promotion of critical thinking. Critical thinking does not automatically result as ...


Cultivating Honors Excellence In The Other Garden, Jeffrey Portnoy Apr 2001

Cultivating Honors Excellence In The Other Garden, Jeffrey Portnoy

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council --Online Archive

Sam Schuman's observations in "Cultivating: Some Thoughts on NCHC's Future" about the weakening of excellence in the academy and our culture are shrewd and accurate. The proliferation of award shows on the television screen and in magazines, for example, with their increasingly specialized and arcane constituencies, underscores his point. This bounty leaves a tacky, deadening glaze across the eyes that is tousled only slightly when an award show crops up that offers, if not the ring of merit, at least the jingle of familiarity. If something more than marketing, the dearth of good programming, or self-promotion is operating ...