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Intellectual History Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Intellectual History

"United We'll Win Our Stand": The Role Of Focalization In Representing Solidarity In The Anthems Of Three Holocaust Concentration Camps, Hillary Louise Herold Jan 2017

"United We'll Win Our Stand": The Role Of Focalization In Representing Solidarity In The Anthems Of Three Holocaust Concentration Camps, Hillary Louise Herold

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

Concentration camps during the Holocaust were populated by various groups of people imprisoned for reasons that were not always associated with religious beliefs. This diversity led to a natural segregation among these groups of prisoners, dependent upon the prisoner’s nationality, the camp’s classification, and its date of establishment. Because of overwhelming feelings of isolation in the majority of the prisoners, it was common to turn to music and music making as means of creating solidarity between the prisoners for survival of their day-to-day experiences. Some works became popular to such an extent through their performances by both prisoners ...


The "Noble Savage" In American Music And Literature, 1790-1855, Jacob Mathew Somers Jan 2017

The "Noble Savage" In American Music And Literature, 1790-1855, Jacob Mathew Somers

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

In the aftermath of the War of 1812, America entered a period of unprecedented territorial expansion, economic growth, and political unity. During this time American intellectuals, writers, and musicians began to contemplate the possibility of a national high culture to match the country’s glorious social and political achievements. Newly founded periodicals urged American authors and artists to adopt national themes and materials to replace those imported from abroad, and for the first time Americans began producing their own literary, artistic, and musical works on a previously inconceivable scale. Though American writers and composers explored a wide range of “national ...