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Full-Text Articles in Intellectual History

Interpreting, Stephanie Jo Kent May 2014

Interpreting, Stephanie Jo Kent

Doctoral Dissertations

What do community interpreting for the Deaf in western societies, conference interpreting for the European Parliament, and language brokering in international management have in common? Academic research and professional training have historically emphasized the linguistic and cognitive challenges of interpreting, neglecting or ignoring the social aspects that structure communication. All forms of interpreting are inherently social; they involve relationships among at least three people and two languages. The contexts explored here, American Sign Language/English interpreting and spoken language interpreting within the European Parliament, show that simultaneous interpreting involves attitudes, norms and values about intercultural communication that overemphasize information and ...


Enlightenment And Catholicism In Europe. A Transnational History, Ulrich Lehner, Jeffrey Burson Mar 2014

Enlightenment And Catholicism In Europe. A Transnational History, Ulrich Lehner, Jeffrey Burson

Ulrich L. Lehner

No abstract provided.


Epilogue: Some Sober Second Thoughts, Christopher Hoebeke Dec 2013

Epilogue: Some Sober Second Thoughts, Christopher Hoebeke

Christopher H Hoebeke

No abstract provided.


The Road To Mass Democracy: Original Intent And The Seventeenth Amendment, Christopher Hoebeke Dec 2013

The Road To Mass Democracy: Original Intent And The Seventeenth Amendment, Christopher Hoebeke

Christopher H Hoebeke

Until 1913 and passage of the Seventeenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, US senators were elected by state legislatures, not directly by the people. Progressive Era reformers urged this revision in answer to the corruption of state "machines" under the dominance of party bosses. They also believed that direct elections would make the Senate more responsive to popular concerns regarding the concentrations of business, capital, and labor that in the industrial era gave rise to a growing sense of individual voicelessness. Popular control over the higher affairs of government was thought to be possible, since the spread of information ...


The Paradox Of Popular Sovereignty: An Introductory Essay, Christopher Hoebeke Dec 2013

The Paradox Of Popular Sovereignty: An Introductory Essay, Christopher Hoebeke

Christopher H Hoebeke

No abstract provided.


»A Kőkorszak Metafizikája« És A »Szép Új Világ«: Herbert Hart A Jog Emberképéről [‘The Metaphysics Of The Stone Age’ And The ‘Brave New World’: Hart On The Law’S View Of Man], Péter Cserne Dec 2013

»A Kőkorszak Metafizikája« És A »Szép Új Világ«: Herbert Hart A Jog Emberképéről [‘The Metaphysics Of The Stone Age’ And The ‘Brave New World’: Hart On The Law’S View Of Man], Péter Cserne

Péter Cserne

This paper analyses H.L.A. Hart’s views on the epistemic character of the law’s assumptions about human behaviour, as articulated in Causation in the Law and Punishment and Responsibility. Hart suggests that the assumptions behind legal doctrines typically combine common sense factual beliefs, moral intuitions, and philosophical theories of earlier ages with sound moral principles, and empirical knowledge. An important task of legal theory is to provide a ‘rational and critical foundation’ for these doctrines. This does not only imply conceptual clarification in light of an epistemic ideal of objectivity but also involves legal theorists in ‘enlightenment ...