Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Gettysburg College

2015

Discipline
Keyword
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 134

Full-Text Articles in History

Crack Open A Bottle Of General Lee – A Second Course, Ryan M. Nadeau Dec 2015

Crack Open A Bottle Of General Lee – A Second Course, Ryan M. Nadeau

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Welcome back, fellow historical diners. Last time, you joined me in comparing a fine selection of Union generals to food. Today, we’ll be examining some of their southern counterparts. Let’s dig in!

Robert E. Lee – Aged, Fine Red Wine with a Side of Steak

Consider the following: red wines are often consumed with red meats such as steak. Steak can be enjoyed in any number of ways, from a backyard barbecue to the finest of dining establishments. In this sense, steak is the former Confederacy, ranging as it did from the most rural farmers to the opulent planters ...


This Month In Civil War History: December 2015, Jeffrey L. Lauck Dec 2015

This Month In Civil War History: December 2015, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Transcript:

Welcome to the Civil War Institute’s “This Month in Civil War History” for December.

In December of 1860 delegates met in Columbus, South Carolina and voted in favor of seceding from the Union. In their justification for leaving the Union, the delegates emphasized their fear that the newly elected President Abraham Lincoln would outlaw slavery. [excerpt]


Dead Broets Society: Masculinity In Walt Whitman’S War Verse, Anika N. Jensen Dec 2015

Dead Broets Society: Masculinity In Walt Whitman’S War Verse, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

There are two images of masculinity in Walt Whitman’s Drum-Taps, his collection of wartime poetry: one, the strong, hardened soldier, the image of manliness, and the other the boyish, rosy-cheeked recruit. Whitman’s sexuality, while not the Victorian social norm, was no secret, and he wrote openly of the hospitalized soldiers during his time as a Union nurse with admiration, affection, and love. Some critics, such as Thomas Wentworth Higginson, castigated Whitman’s queer themes to be overwhelming, distractingly sensual, and "unmanly," while others, like William Sloane Kennedy, dissented, arguing instead that the overt sexuality present in Whitman’s ...


The Oatmeal Brigade: Quaker Life During The Civil War, Anika N. Jensen Dec 2015

The Oatmeal Brigade: Quaker Life During The Civil War, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Quakers in the Civil War seems like an inherently contradictory idea; the Society of Friends practices pacifism and nonviolence, and, for many, putting money or resources toward war efforts goes against the faith. But tensions were high in 1861, and deviations from Quakerism were made when Friends, both Northern and Southern, had to choose whether to prioritize the sanctity of union, support abolition, or remain neutral. Each of these decisions had its share of repercussions within the religious community, and the Quakers themselves found their mindsets changing as the tide of the war rolled on, whether they chose to fight ...


The Saint Patrick’S Battalion: Loyalty, Nativism, And Identity In The Nineteenth Century And Today, Kevin P. Lavery Dec 2015

The Saint Patrick’S Battalion: Loyalty, Nativism, And Identity In The Nineteenth Century And Today, Kevin P. Lavery

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Two decades before the Irish Brigade covered itself with glory, an earlier unit of Irish immigrants had won renown for its service during the Mexican American War. Calling themselves the Saint Patrick’s Battalion, these men marched under a flag of brilliant emerald decorated with Irish motifs: a harp, a shamrock, and the image of Saint Patrick [excerpt].


Joshua Chamberlain On Mars: Chambermania And Beyond!, Ryan M. Nadeau Dec 2015

Joshua Chamberlain On Mars: Chambermania And Beyond!, Ryan M. Nadeau

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

You don’t need to be a rocket scientist to observe one fact about Mars: it has a lot of rocks. While each is typically given a name based on protocols of scientific classification, many are known by informal, often humorous names like "Grandma" and "Space Ghost." And now on Mars, there’s a rock for fans of Civil War history—"Chamberlain," named of course for Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, the hero of Little Round Top [excerpt].


Lost Cause In The Oval Office: Woodrow Wilson’S Racist Policies And White-Washed Memory Of The Civil War, Jeffrey L. Lauck Dec 2015

Lost Cause In The Oval Office: Woodrow Wilson’S Racist Policies And White-Washed Memory Of The Civil War, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

For the past several weeks, students all across the nation have opened up discussions on race relations on university campuses and in American culture at large. The latest battlefield in the fight for greater inclusion is Princeton University, where protestors from the Black Justice League staged a 32 hour sit-in at the president’s office. Princeton University, traditionally viewed as a bastion of progressivism and liberal ideology, is coming under fire for its reverence for perhaps their most famous graduate, President Woodrow Wilson. Wilson graduated from Princeton University Class of 1879 and served as president of the school from 1902 ...


General Mcclellan Is A Fruitcake And Other Tasteful Metaphors, Ryan M. Nadeau Nov 2015

General Mcclellan Is A Fruitcake And Other Tasteful Metaphors, Ryan M. Nadeau

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

The idea for this post was born from a comment I made while bored and generally sleep deprived on a road trip to the James Buchanan symposium earlier this fall. After some serious historical discussion with my traveling companions, including two other CWI fellows, I made a very non-serious observation. It went something like this:

"You know, I think Buchanan looks a lot like a soft-serve vanilla ice cream cone" [excerpt].


The Grand Parade: Remembering The American Civil War, Elizabeth A. Smith Nov 2015

The Grand Parade: Remembering The American Civil War, Elizabeth A. Smith

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

On November 21, a small contingent from the 26th PEMR or PCG—Gettysburg College’s reenacting group—gathered early in the morning in Union uniform and civilian dress outside of the Appleford Inn. With a flowered wreath in hand, the small group made their way down Chambersburg Street. There, in sight of the Dollar General and the Segway Tour office, they laid the wreath at the base of the monument, which features a young college boy, musket in hand, as he marches off to battle. The group of students read the history of the unit and had their pictures taken ...


Some Small Tribute: How Modern Americans Find Meaning In The National Cemetery, Matthew D. Laroche Nov 2015

Some Small Tribute: How Modern Americans Find Meaning In The National Cemetery, Matthew D. Laroche

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

metery By Matt LaRoche ’17 In anticipation of Remembrance Day and Dedication Day this week, we have asked our Fellows why and how they commemorate the Civil War. Read Megan’s post below, then check back later in the week for more posts on commemoration and remembrance. In my last post, I appealed to the public to make good on the tragedies of Gettysburg in the same broad vein as President Clinton’s appeal at the 20th anniversary of the genocide at Srebrenica—to make the tragedy a “sacred trust” towards a better future. Needless to say, the material of ...


Cwi Radio Report: Dedication Day And Remembrance Day 2015, Jeffrey L. Lauck Nov 2015

Cwi Radio Report: Dedication Day And Remembrance Day 2015, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

These were the words delivered by President Abraham Lincoln at the dedication ceremony of the Soldiers National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19th, 1863. The National Cemetery was made possible by the efforts of local attorneys David Wills and David McConaughy. President Lincoln was invited to give "a few appropriate remarks" at the dedication of the new national cemetery by Wills, and stayed at Wills’ house, located in Union Square at the center of town. At the dedication ceremony, Edward Everett, an acclaimed orator at the time, delivered the main speech of the afternoon. Everett’s account of the ...


The Good, The Great, And The Ugly Of Public History, Jeffrey L. Lauck Nov 2015

The Good, The Great, And The Ugly Of Public History, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

My last post recounted some of my favorite takeaways from my Civil War road trip this summer. But this trip was about more than just mosquito bites and cheap donuts; it was the first time I ever visited a historical site as a student of public history. My first tour was with Elizabeth Smith ’17 at the Sunken Road at Fredericksburg. Elizabeth’s tour was unique in that she was able to connect the events that transpired along Marye’s Heights, a moderately nuanced subject, to President Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, a very well-known subject. I was delighted to see ...


On The Road: A Summer Odyssey In Dixie, Jeffrey L. Lauck Nov 2015

On The Road: A Summer Odyssey In Dixie, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

All summer long, readers of The Gettysburg Compiler were treated to posts from Pohanka interns documenting their research and experiences at historical sites across the country. While I did not participate in the Pohanka internship program this summer, I did take a few of my friends on a week-long camping trip to visit a couple of the interns and see them in action. Our plan was to drive from Connecticut to Harrisburg, PA, where we would stay with friends for the night, then drive to Fredericksburg, VA to tour the Civil War battlefields there and around Richmond [excerpt].


Ready, Aim, Feminism: When Women Went Off To War, Anika N. Jensen Nov 2015

Ready, Aim, Feminism: When Women Went Off To War, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

I like to imagine that if Sarah Emma Edmonds were my contemporary she would often sport a t-shirt saying, "This is what a feminist looks like."

Edmonds was a patriot, a feminist, and, along with an estimated 400 other women, a soldier in the American Civil War. Fed up with her father’s abuse and appalled at the prospect of an arranged marriage Edmonds left her New Brunswick home at the age of fifteen and soon adopted a male identity to become a successful worker. When the war erupted, she was compelled by a sense of patriotism and adventure to ...


A Woman In Soldier’S Dress: Then And Now, Elizabeth A. Smith Nov 2015

A Woman In Soldier’S Dress: Then And Now, Elizabeth A. Smith

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

This post is the second in a three-part series on women soldiers in the Civil War and during modern reenactments. Also check out the introduction of this series.

I was thirteen years old when I joined the 5th Kentucky Orphan Brigade, a Confederate reenactment group based out of south-central Kentucky. At fourteen, I “saw the elephant”—a Civil War term for seeing battle—for the first time as a soldier. It was the most terrifying thing I’ve ever done, but seven years later I credit that decision to go through with it as bringing me to where I ...


A Woman In Soldier’S Dress: Taking The Field, Elizabeth A. Smith Nov 2015

A Woman In Soldier’S Dress: Taking The Field, Elizabeth A. Smith

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

The year was 1989. The place, a Civil War reenactment at Antietam National Battlefield. Lauren Cook (then Burgess) had been participating in reenactments for two years. Her portrayal of a fifer required her to wear a soldier’s uniform rather than in a civilian woman’s dress. She did her best to portray a soldier, disguising her sex so she could pass the “fifteen yard” rule, which meant that at fifteen yards she could not be identified as a woman. The call of nature proved to be her undoing, however, when an NPS official “caught” her coming out of the ...


Ms-187: Papers Of Gregory J. Landrey, Class Of 1977, Devin D. Mckinney Nov 2015

Ms-187: Papers Of Gregory J. Landrey, Class Of 1977, Devin D. Mckinney

All Finding Aids

In January Term of his senior year, Gettysburg College history major Gregory J. Landrey ‘77 took an individualized study course under Professor Charles Glatfelter. His project—an up-to-date chronicle of the college’s real estate history including land purchases, demolished buildings, and recent construction projects—entailed extensive research in numerous college offices, as well as at the Adams County Historical Society. As the project proceeded, it also expanded, ultimately taking the entire spring semester to complete.

Landrey’s final 68-page paper, titled A History of the Gettysburg College Campus, was submitted on May 27, 1977. Recognized as an important addition ...


I Ain’T Afraid Of No Ghosts, Kevin P. Lavery Oct 2015

I Ain’T Afraid Of No Ghosts, Kevin P. Lavery

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

I had no plans of writing a blog post this week. I said my piece on ghost tours last year. This Halloween, it was the next generation’s turn to share their opinions on the matter. Jules and Jen both did a spectacular job on the subject, and I commend them even though our perspectives differ. But when I learned that my stance had come under fire from another blog, I eagerly leapt from the comfort of my editing armchair and returned to the front lines to compose this piece [excerpt].


Seeing The Sorrow Anew: Recapturing The Reality Of Suffering Through Srebrenica, Matthew D. Laroche Oct 2015

Seeing The Sorrow Anew: Recapturing The Reality Of Suffering Through Srebrenica, Matthew D. Laroche

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Those who know death know mourning. Those who know mourning know the meaning of empty spaces that we all wish had stayed filled. But do we, or even can we, as the few members of this society who habitually reflect upon the tragedies and triumphs of the past, fully understand the immensity of the suffering we dwell upon while wandering our battlefields? [excerpt]


What's New In Preservation At Musselman Library: Student Workers And The Beauty Of The Book, Carolyn Sautter, Mary Wootton Oct 2015

What's New In Preservation At Musselman Library: Student Workers And The Beauty Of The Book, Carolyn Sautter, Mary Wootton

Musselman Library Staff Publications

Musselman Library's Special Collections and College Archives at Gettysburg College involves student workers and interns in our preservation and conservation efforts. The recent addition to the staff of a half-time conservator position has opened up new avenues for training. This has also resulted in additional access points for our students, faculty and other researchers to interact with our collections. This presentation discusses our preservation activities and our new digital collection The Beauty of the Book. It also illustrates how we have engaged student workers in conservation and enhanced cataloging description projects giving them a deeper appreciation for and understanding ...


“The Colored Soldiers”—The Poem You Never Knew Existed, Matthew D. Laroche Oct 2015

“The Colored Soldiers”—The Poem You Never Knew Existed, Matthew D. Laroche

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

I’m a poetry guy. When I expect to have some free time, I tend to carry a small book of poems somewhere on my person. I also have eclectic tastes, so the subject and the substance of my little pocket anthologies changes. This summer, while at home from Gettysburg National Military Park, I pulled a book off the shelf—War Poems, from the Everyman’s Library Pocket Poets series. I found plenty of what you might expect to find in such a book—Lord Tennyson, Wilfred Owen, Randall Jarrell. The subjects were classic—the “wild charge” of the Light ...


The Intersection Of Art And Public History: Schmucker Art Gallery’S Newest Exhibit, Jeffrey L. Lauck Oct 2015

The Intersection Of Art And Public History: Schmucker Art Gallery’S Newest Exhibit, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

“‘Pray For the People Who Feed You’: Voices of Pauper Children in the Industrial Age” is the newest exhibit to be featured in the Schmucker Art Gallery at Gettysburg College. The exhibit was curated by Gettysburg College senior Rebecca Duffy ’16, and is the culmination of her three semester International Bridge Course (IBC) program. At its opening on Friday, October 2, Duffy discussed her experiences with the IBC program and the process she went through in putting together this unique project [excerpt].


Finally Speaking Up: Sexual Assault In The Civil War Era, Anika N. Jensen Oct 2015

Finally Speaking Up: Sexual Assault In The Civil War Era, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Trigger warning: This article contains detail concerning rape and sexual assault.

On March 12, 1864, in the midst of a bloody war which had long overflowed its thimble, Margaret Brooks was returning from her home near Memphis, Tennessee when her wagon broke down in Nonconnah Creek. Not long after her driver left to find help, three rambunctious New Jersey cavalrymen, all white, approached Brooks, demanding her money. She was then raped multiple times at gunpoint [excerpt].


The Clash Of Storytelling And History, Ryan M. Nadeau Oct 2015

The Clash Of Storytelling And History, Ryan M. Nadeau

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

One of the most enduring archetypes of heroic storytelling is the triumph of the underdog: a figure who overcomes great and powerful foes due to their innate virtues, the nobility of their goal, or the hubris of their arrogant and highly flawed enemy. Their triumph illustrates the existence of greater forces of fairness, justice, and righteousness in their story world: a world in which they who are truly deserving of victory find it, and they who are unworthy are cast down – a story which has a spotty record at best in the real world. The narrative does not necessarily have ...


"Pray For The People Who Feed You": Voices Of Pauper Children In The Industrial Age, Rebecca S. Duffy, Jill Ogline Titus Oct 2015

"Pray For The People Who Feed You": Voices Of Pauper Children In The Industrial Age, Rebecca S. Duffy, Jill Ogline Titus

Schmucker Art Catalogs

Following the Industrial Revolution in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, countries such as the United States and England experienced a widening gap between the rich industrialists and the impoverished working class. As a result, poverty quickly shifted from a localized problem to a national epidemic. Each country was faced with the challenges of addressing and alleviating poverty on a national scale. With a limited amount of resources, questions arose about who should receive relief. What should it look like? How should it be administered? And how would poverty and policy affect political, economic, social and familial structures? [excerpt]


Friends Of Musselman Library Newsletter Fall 2015, Musselman Library Oct 2015

Friends Of Musselman Library Newsletter Fall 2015, Musselman Library

Friends of Musselman Library Newsletter

From the Dean (Robin Wagner)

Avian Flew! (Peter Morgan)

First-Year Book Group

Library News

Students Help Make History Public (Steven Semmel '16, Andrew Dalton '19)

Student Exhibit Exemplifies Liberal Arts (Rebecca Duffy '16)

Report Cards Reveal More Than Grades

Interview with Lawrence Taylor: Case Map Collection

Research Reflections: Eisenhower's Correspondence (Michael J. Birkner '72)

Musselman Likes Ike

Eisenhower in Focus

Hammann Honored (Louis Hammann '51)

Rare Document on Holocaust

GettDigital: The Beauty of a Book (Rachel Hammer '15)

Focus on Philanthropy: Kimberly Rae Connor '79

Gifts to Musselman Library

Research Help Desk: Different Name, Same Great Service!


He Was The Best Of Kings; He Was The Worst Of Kings: A Critique Of The Literary Presentation Of Richard I, Estelle Reed Oct 2015

He Was The Best Of Kings; He Was The Worst Of Kings: A Critique Of The Literary Presentation Of Richard I, Estelle Reed

Student Publications

In order to achieve a more holistic understanding of Mediterranean History during the Third Crusade, a critical analysis of Richard I is necessary. This paper questions how accurately Richard I was portrayed in literary sources during the Third Crusade and attempts to construct as complete an image of the various motivations that led to differing depictions of Richard I as possible through a critical analysis of literary sources. Focusing on how his actions during the Third Crusade were interpreted, this paper will show the various, often opposing, sentiments held by both Western and Muslim authors on Richard I. Once a ...


Ms-186: Papers Of The Christ Chapel Community Welfare Program, Devin Mckinney Oct 2015

Ms-186: Papers Of The Christ Chapel Community Welfare Program, Devin Mckinney

All Finding Aids

Though small and fragmentary, this collection contains important evidence dating from a crucial historical moment. It is particularly valuable to understanding how Gettysburg College responded to heightened pressures (from within and without) to diversify, engage, and reach across lines of race, economics, and social status.

Included are ephemeral announcements of program activities; inter-office memos; purchase receipts; correspondence between and from program members; questionnaires filled out by community children; and photographs taken at program activities.

Special Collections and College Archives Finding Aids are discovery tools used to describe and provide access to our holdings. Finding aids include historical and biographical information ...


Slavery And The Civil War: The Reflections Of A Yankee Intern In Appomattox, Jonathan G. Danchik Oct 2015

Slavery And The Civil War: The Reflections Of A Yankee Intern In Appomattox, Jonathan G. Danchik

Student Publications

An overview of the "Lost Cause" and the resultant challenges faced by interpreters in Civil War parks.


The "Unfinished Work:" The Civil War Centennial And The Civil Rights Movement, Megan A. Sutter Oct 2015

The "Unfinished Work:" The Civil War Centennial And The Civil Rights Movement, Megan A. Sutter

Student Publications

The Civil War Centennial celebrations fell short of a great opportunity in which Americans could reflect on the legacy of the Civil War through the racial crisis erupting in their nation. Different groups exploited the Centennial for their own purposes, but only the African Americans and civil rights activists tried to emphasize the importance of emancipation and slavery to the memory of the war. Southerners asserted states’ rights in resistance to what they saw as a black rebellion in their area. Northerners reflected back on the theme of reconciliation, prevalent in the seventy-fifth anniversary of the war. Unfortunately, those who ...