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New Deal, 1933-1939 - Relating To (Sc 3459), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jul 2019

New Deal, 1933-1939 - Relating To (Sc 3459), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3459. Letter, 4 May 1943, of South Carolina Congressman H. P. Fulmer to E. M. Biggers, Houston, Texas, challenging Biggers to justify his “statement” concerning federal agencies created under the “Roosevelt New Deal Party”; and Biggers’ reply of 5 June 1943, a lengthy criticism of “these damnable Bureaus” as the creation of “fan-tailed theorists” and encroachments on American liberty. The two letters and a compilation of names of the “Alphabetical Agencies” (also included) are reproductions created by Biggers, the owner of a printing company, for public distribution.


Women And Work: African American Women In Depression Era America, Sarah Ward May 2018

Women And Work: African American Women In Depression Era America, Sarah Ward

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This project explores whether African American women met similar public sentiments as Caucasian women during the Depression Era and how gender dynamics changed within African American households in urban America as well as the effect of the crisis on a populace that was not new to the work force. Historical statistical analysis and emphasis on labor policy are used to garner information. The Great Depression sparked an abrupt shift in not only the American economy but also American ideology regarding male and female gender dynamics. Despite discouragement from entering the workforce due to dominant masculinity, employment rates rose amongst Caucasian ...


"To Prevent Pernicious Political Activities" : The 1938 Kentucky Democratic Primary And The Hatch Act Of 1939., Raymond Michael Myers Iv May 2018

"To Prevent Pernicious Political Activities" : The 1938 Kentucky Democratic Primary And The Hatch Act Of 1939., Raymond Michael Myers Iv

College of Arts & Sciences Senior Honors Theses

By 1938, popularity for President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal had declined. The 1938 Kentucky Democratic primary, pitting Senate Majority Leader Alben Barkley against Governor A.B. “Happy” Chandler, became a referendum on the administration. During the campaign, each candidate accused their opponent of employing government resources to buy votes. This national scandal prompted Congress to enact the Hatch Act of 1939. Still in effect, this law restricted how federal employees interacted with political campaigns. This paper contends that the 1939 Hatch Act served as a constitutional backlash against the New Deal’s federal expansion and the rise of ...


Gen Ms 07 Farm Security Administration Photographs Finding Aid, Siobain C. Monahan Apr 2018

Gen Ms 07 Farm Security Administration Photographs Finding Aid, Siobain C. Monahan

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Description:

Reproductions from the Library of Congress, Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information Photograph Collection, used in a 1974 exhibition at the University Art Gallery. The photographs are by Jack Delano, John Collier, Edwin Locke, Carl Mydans, Arthur Rothstein, Marion Post Wolcott, Russell Lee, Edwin Rosskam, Fenno Jacobs, Walker Evans, Herbert Mayer, Gordon Parks, and Walter Payton. Places represented include: in Maine, Aroostook County, Ashland, Bath, Boothbay, Caribou, Fort Kent, Fryeburg, Houlton, Lille, New Sweden, Presque Isle, Rockland, Saint David, Soldier Pond, and Van Buren; in Vermont, Bellows Falls, Brattleboro, Bridgewater, Castleton, Essex Junction, Hardwick, Lowell, Manchester, Morrisville, Orange ...


Gen Ms 06 Ben Shahn Photographs Finding Aid, Siobain C. Monahan Apr 2018

Gen Ms 06 Ben Shahn Photographs Finding Aid, Siobain C. Monahan

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Description:

Ben Shahn was an artist who used photographs primarily as a starting point for paintings. He was employed in the New Deal Resettlement (later Farm Security) Administration as an artist, but also assisted with the photographic projects. The collection consists of reproductions from the Library of Congress, Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information Photograph Collection, used in a 1976 exhibition at the University Art Gallery.

Size of Collection:

4.5 ft.


Gen Ms 05 Walker Evans Photographs Finding Aid, Siobain C. Monahan Mar 2018

Gen Ms 05 Walker Evans Photographs Finding Aid, Siobain C. Monahan

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Description:

Walker Evans was a self-taught photographer who pointed a new direction in American documentary photography in the 1930s. In the mid-1930s, he worked for President Roosevelt’s New Deal Resettlement (later Farm Security) Administration, taking photographs intended to alert America’s increasingly urban society to the plight of the rural poor during the Great Depression. The collection consists of reproductions from the Library of Congress, Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information Photograph Collection, used in a 1978 exhibition at the University Art Gallery.

Size of Collection:

4.5 ft.


Precarious Democracy: "It Can't Happen Here" As The Federal Theatre's Site Of Mass Resistance, Macy Donyce Jones Nov 2017

Precarious Democracy: "It Can't Happen Here" As The Federal Theatre's Site Of Mass Resistance, Macy Donyce Jones

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

The scholarly consensus of the Federal Theatre Project (FTP) is that it was a massive undertaking set to employ theatre professionals during the Great Depression. That undertaking resulted in vibrant, relevant theatre that helped to build a theatre audience across the nation. Outside of the overview-style scholarship, specialized studies have delved into the FTP as a community-building enterprise, a site of racial/ethnic study, and an essential new play creator.

My scholarship fills a hole that previous FTP scholarship has left open. The FTP was a political machine engaged in producing pro-American propaganda. That aspect of production has been largely ...


When Old Age Changed: Inventing The "Senior State," 1945-1975, Benjamin Hellwege Sep 2017

When Old Age Changed: Inventing The "Senior State," 1945-1975, Benjamin Hellwege

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This dissertation asks why public assistance at the federal level in the United States has become significantly oriented towards the needs of older Americans since the New Deal era. It argues that in effect the United States has developed an old age welfare state – a “senior state,” in other words, which has sought primarily to protect the economic status of older Americans, and that the creation of this “senior state” represents the end-point of a long-term project by social reformers, organized labor, and old age advocacy organizations over the course of the second half of the 20th century to institutionalize ...


Tennessee Valley Authority, Division Of Forestry (Sc 3100), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Apr 2017

Tennessee Valley Authority, Division Of Forestry (Sc 3100), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3100. Report on the forestry reconnaissance of the proposed Gilbertsville, Kentucky, reservoir area. Prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority, Division of Forestry, November, 1936. Contains black and white photographs.


Restoring Sound To The Stacks: The American Library As Music Space In The Great Depression, Katheryn Christine Lawson Apr 2017

Restoring Sound To The Stacks: The American Library As Music Space In The Great Depression, Katheryn Christine Lawson

School of Library and Information Science Graduate Student Posters

In the cultural imagination, libraries often conjure images of pristine aisles of books managed by strict, shushing librarians. However, libraries in the United States, both large and small, have embraced the sights and sounds of music concerts for well over a century. As a crucial point in this historical trajectory, the Great Depression provides a fascinating window onto the multi-layered music histories of American libraries and their patrons. In the midst of economic struggle, libraries joined concert halls and community centers to host high-profile Library of Congress concert series, local “Evenings with the Victrola,” and WPA composer forums. In their ...


An 'Answer To Hopes And Dreams': Utopianism, Progressivism, And The American Spatial Tradition In The New Deal Resettlement Community Of Greenhills, Ohio, Jared M. Berg Jan 2017

An 'Answer To Hopes And Dreams': Utopianism, Progressivism, And The American Spatial Tradition In The New Deal Resettlement Community Of Greenhills, Ohio, Jared M. Berg

Senior Independent Study Theses

The purpose of this project is to explain what historical forces led to the construction of Greenhills, Ohio. The goal is to show that Greenhills is one example in a very long line of planned residential communities in American history which have been designed in order to solve contemporary societal issues. This has been done by examining how Americans have constructed space in preceding planned communities. Upon examining these examples, it is clear that Greenhills is very much part of what I identify as an American spatial tradition, a community which especially borrows from the utopian and progressive elements of ...


All Play And No Work: The Protestant Work Ethic And The Comic Plays Of The Federal Theatre Project, Paul Gagliardi May 2015

All Play And No Work: The Protestant Work Ethic And The Comic Plays Of The Federal Theatre Project, Paul Gagliardi

Theses and Dissertations

Given the massive unemployment of the era, the subject of work dominated the politics and culture of the Great Depression. In particular, most government programs of the New Deal sought to provide jobs or reinforce long-standing American views of working. These aims were reflected by the Federal Theatre Project (FTP), which was charged with providing jobs to unemployed theatre workers and uplifting the spirits of audiences. But the FTP also strove to challenge its audiences by staging overtly political theatre. In this context, many comic plays -which have long been ignored by scholars of the FTP - actually challenged work norms ...


"Waste Not, Want Not": Farmers' Reactions To The New Deal In Minnesota, Kacie Phillips Jan 2015

"Waste Not, Want Not": Farmers' Reactions To The New Deal In Minnesota, Kacie Phillips

Departmental Honors Projects

By the time of the Stock Market Crash in 1929, farmers in America were already in financial trouble with the drop in demand after World War I. With poverty and malnourishment rampant, the motto of the Great Depression became “waste not, want not.” The government focused on alleviating human suffering in President Franklin Roosevelt’s “Hundred Days” of 1933 and instituted numerous legislative acts for relief, with special attention paid to farmers. As the rest of the nation fell into economic hardship, the government gave unprecedented attention to agriculture and developed relief programs to aid farmers and their families. Some ...


The New Deal In Puerto Rico: Public Works, Public Health, And The Puerto Rico Reconstruction Administration, 1935-1955, Geoff G. Burrows Oct 2014

The New Deal In Puerto Rico: Public Works, Public Health, And The Puerto Rico Reconstruction Administration, 1935-1955, Geoff G. Burrows

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

During the 1930s, Puerto Rico experienced acute infrastructural and public health crises caused by the economic contraction of the Great Depression, the devastating San Felipe and San Ciprián hurricanes of 1928 and 1932, and the limitations of the local political structure. Signed into law by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1935, the Puerto Rico Reconstruction Administration (PRRA) replaced all other New Deal activity on the island. As a locally-run federal agency, the PRRA was very unique and yet very representative of the "Second" New Deal in the United States--which attempted to move beyond finding immediate solutions to the most critical ...


What's The New Deal With Marshall? Depression Relief And Higher Education, Hubert Wesley Rolling Jan 2014

What's The New Deal With Marshall? Depression Relief And Higher Education, Hubert Wesley Rolling

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

Employing archival research, this study examines the history of the New Deal’s influence on higher education, focusing on Marshall University, at the time Marshall College, from approximately 1932-1940. First, it analyzes the Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) and National Youth Administration (NYA) student part-time employment program’s impact on the college. Second, it discusses the PWA’s (Public Works Administration) and WPA’s (Works Progress Administration) building programs’ and flood relief efforts’ effect on Marshall. Finally, this study explores the political implications of the New Deal with emphasis on state politics and financial problems and their relationship to Marshall ...


Scaffolding The New Deal: Exploring The Legislative Roots Of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Fireside Chats, Christopher Thomas Brockman Jan 2014

Scaffolding The New Deal: Exploring The Legislative Roots Of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Fireside Chats, Christopher Thomas Brockman

Theses and Dissertations

The historiography of President Franklin Roosevelt's fireside chats, up until this point, have focused on FDR's ability to radiate confidence via these captivating and extremely popular radio addresses. When examined more closely, a clear outline of the New Deal takes shape, suggesting FDR's true intentions behind the fireside chats: to educate the public of the administration's legislative endeavors. Roosevelt's second fireside chat, delivered on May 7, 1933, provides a vision for how the New Deal would correct the agricultural and industrial ills of the Great Depression and, in turn, revitalize the United States. In order ...


Hodges, Ida Leighton, 1885-1949 (Sc 1025), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives May 2013

Hodges, Ida Leighton, 1885-1949 (Sc 1025), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 1028. Letters commending Hodges for a variety of civic activities, including her work as coordinator of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration and Civil Works Administration in Bowling Green, Kentucky during the 1930s.


The Long Exception: Rethinking The Place Of The New Deal In American History, Jefferson Cowie, Nick Salvatore Jun 2012

The Long Exception: Rethinking The Place Of The New Deal In American History, Jefferson Cowie, Nick Salvatore

Nick Salvatore

"The Long Exception" examines the period from Franklin Roosevelt to the end of the twentieth century and argues that the New Deal was more of an historical aberration—a byproduct of the massive crisis of the Great Depression—than the linear triumph of the welfare state. The depth of the Depression undoubtedly forced the realignment of American politics and class relations for decades, but, it is argued, there is more continuity in American politics between the periods before the New Deal order and those after its decline than there is between the postwar era and the rest of American history ...


America Reborn? Conservatives, Liberals, And American Political Culture Since 1945, Nick Salvatore Jun 2012

America Reborn? Conservatives, Liberals, And American Political Culture Since 1945, Nick Salvatore

Nick Salvatore

[Excerpt] From the perspective of the early twenty‑first century, we can chide the good professor for not carefully considering the consequences of what he wished for half a century ago. For it is clear that the force of this conservative movement in America was in fact “stronger than most of us [knew]” or could have imagined in 1950, or, indeed, in 1968. This conservative “impulse”, those “irritable mental gestures”, has largely restructured American political thinking with a force and popular approval that remains stunning to consider. The growth of the conservative movement since 1945 was also accompanied by the ...


How Blacks Became Blue: The 1936 African American Voting Shift From The Party Of Lincoln To The New Deal Coalition, Daphney Daniel Apr 2012

How Blacks Became Blue: The 1936 African American Voting Shift From The Party Of Lincoln To The New Deal Coalition, Daphney Daniel

Pell Scholars and Senior Theses

Despite the vast research done on the African American influence in the Democratic Party, comparably little has been done on what led them to become part of the Democratic Party in the first place. This study offers an overview of the rich political history of the African American experience from the 15th Amendment’s ratification in 1870 to the 1936 presidential election. My research will reveal how Republican apathy, depression era desperation and Roosevelt’s charismatic message of relief and hope played a vital role to the historical shift of the African American voting bloc from the Republican to the ...


The Switch In Time That Saved Nine: A Study Of Justice Owen Roberts's Vote In West Coast Hotel Co. V. Parrish, Brian T. Goldman Jan 2012

The Switch In Time That Saved Nine: A Study Of Justice Owen Roberts's Vote In West Coast Hotel Co. V. Parrish, Brian T. Goldman

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

During President Roosevelt's first term in office (1932-1936) the Supreme Court ruled several landmark New Deal measures unconstitutional; a handful of these decisions were by 5-4 margins. It all changed in 1937, when swing Justice Owen Roberts voted to affirm a minimum wage statute in West Coast Hotel Co. v. Parrish; a year earlier he had voted against minimum wage legislation in a similar case.

This "switch in time that saved nine" has no established consensus that explains its occurrence. Some have posited that President Roosevelt's "court packing" legislation forced Roberts's hand, while other have argued that ...


New Deal Experimentation And The Political Economy Of The Yankton Sioux, 1930-1934, Teresa M. Houser Jul 2011

New Deal Experimentation And The Political Economy Of The Yankton Sioux, 1930-1934, Teresa M. Houser

Great Plains Quarterly

Franklin Delano Roosevelt's election to the presidency in 1932 signaled a mandate for sweeping reform at the federal level to lift the nation out of the economic turbulence of the Great Depression. Under Commissioner of Indian Affairs John Collier, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) joined other agencies in launching policies to rebuild economic stability. Much of the scholarship on the Indian New Deal to date necessarily focuses on the centerpiece of Collier's reform efforts: the Indian Reorganization Act (IRA). But prior to tribal consideration of the IRA, the Roosevelt administration undertook a series of steps in an ...


Taking Off: The Politics And Culture Of American Aviation, 1920-1939, Mcmillan Houston Johnson V May 2011

Taking Off: The Politics And Culture Of American Aviation, 1920-1939, Mcmillan Houston Johnson V

Doctoral Dissertations

Historians have traditionally emphasized the sharp differences between Herbert Hoover’s vision of an associational state and the activism of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal. This dissertation highlights an important area of continuity between the economic policies espoused by Hoover—during his tenures as Secretary of Commerce and President—and Roosevelt, focusing on federal efforts to promote the nascent aviation industry from the end of World War I until the passage of the Civil Aeronautics Act in 1938. These efforts were successful, and offer a unique arena in which to document the concrete gains wrought by Hoover’s associationalist ...


“Consolidating The New Position (1938-1940)”: A Study Of The Tenure Of Robert H. Jackson: March 5, 1938 To January 18, 1940, Nicholas John Stamato Dec 2009

“Consolidating The New Position (1938-1940)”: A Study Of The Tenure Of Robert H. Jackson: March 5, 1938 To January 18, 1940, Nicholas John Stamato

Dissertations - ALL

Robert H. Jackson’s service as Solicitor General has attained mythic status, prompting academics and commentators consistently to rate him as one of the greatest appointees to that office. In part, his stature reflects his extraordinary skill as an attorney. In some measure, Jackson’s legend draws upon the Supreme Court’s growing liberalism, which occurred upon his watch. As Peter Ubertaccio argues in his history of the office, Learned in the Law and Politics, the stature of the Solicitor General suffered during the early 1930s, when the court generally ruled against the government, then improved as the court sided ...


Warren County - New Deal Programs, 1934-1935 (Mss 253), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jun 2009

Warren County - New Deal Programs, 1934-1935 (Mss 253), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 253. Documents related to New Deal relief programs in Warren County, Kentucky and surrounding counties; correspondence of Ida Leighton Hodges, Bowling Green, Area Administrator of the Kentucky Emergency Relief Administration.


"The Varied Carols I Hear": The Music Of The New Deal In The West, Peter L. Gough Jan 2009

"The Varied Carols I Hear": The Music Of The New Deal In The West, Peter L. Gough

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

The Federal Music Project and subsequent WPA Music Programs served as components of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's "New Deal" efforts to combat the economic devastation precipitated by the Great Depression. Operating during the years 1936 to 1943, these programs that engaged unemployed musicians mirrored similar efforts of the Federal Theatre, Art and Writers' Projects. Though the Federal Music Project proved to be the largest of the cultural programs in terms of both employment and attendance, to date it has received the least attention from scholars. This dissertation demonstrates that, given the societal landscape of 1930s America, a regional perspective ...


Jenkins, William Marshall, Jr., 1918-2002 (Sc 1748), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2008

Jenkins, William Marshall, Jr., 1918-2002 (Sc 1748), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 1748. Unpublished manuscript, "Mr. Democrat," written by William Marshall Jenkins Jr. about the political career of Alben W. Barkley, former U.S. Representative and Senator from Kentucky and former Vice President under Harry Truman. Chiefly excerpts from his speeches and remarks made on the floor of the House and Senate.


The Long Exception: Rethinking The Place Of The New Deal In American History, Jefferson Cowie, Nick Salvatore Oct 2008

The Long Exception: Rethinking The Place Of The New Deal In American History, Jefferson Cowie, Nick Salvatore

Articles and Chapters

"The Long Exception" examines the period from Franklin Roosevelt to the end of the twentieth century and argues that the New Deal was more of an historical aberration—a byproduct of the massive crisis of the Great Depression—than the linear triumph of the welfare state. The depth of the Depression undoubtedly forced the realignment of American politics and class relations for decades, but, it is argued, there is more continuity in American politics between the periods before the New Deal order and those after its decline than there is between the postwar era and the rest of American history ...


Edmonson County New Deal Program Files (Mss 95), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jul 2008

Edmonson County New Deal Program Files (Mss 95), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 95. Administrative files, chiefly applications and correspondence, for three Edmonson County, Kentucky New Deal programs: the Civilian Conservation Corps, the National Youth Administration, and the Works Progress Administration.


Dead Roses And Blooming Deserts: The Medical History Of A New Deal Icon, Michelle F. Turk Jan 2007

Dead Roses And Blooming Deserts: The Medical History Of A New Deal Icon, Michelle F. Turk

Psi Sigma Siren

Although a memorial plaque at the Hoover Dam sets the number of workers killed during its construction at ninety-six, the real figure was nearly double. In fact, the figure would have been much higher had it not been for the precedent-setting effort by the federal government, contactors, and workers to save as many lives as possible on the project. Aside from its long unrecognized value as a jobs program, much needed stimulus to the fledging Las Vegas economy, and status as one of the “man-made wonders of the world,” Hoover Dam represented a major step forward for the American occupational ...