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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Creative Suffering: The Theme Of Mediation In Pascal's Pensées, Kathleen Merrow Jan 1990

Creative Suffering: The Theme Of Mediation In Pascal's Pensées, Kathleen Merrow

Anthós (1990-1996)

The idea of mediation runs through Pascal’s Pensées and is an important part of his contribution to western thought. This paper traces the concept of mediation through the theme of creative suffering and the figure of Christ in Pensées. In addition, Pascal’s particular concept of mediation can be found as a supporting concept to the philosophies of such diverse early 20th century figures as Poincare, Blondel, and Bergson. In the end this paper traces a complicated and complex problem for Pascal, that of Mediation, and suggests that it ultimately had tragic consequences for him.


The Use Of Vergil's Aeneid In St. Augustine's Confessions, Jennifer S. Oberst Jan 1990

The Use Of Vergil's Aeneid In St. Augustine's Confessions, Jennifer S. Oberst

Anthós (1990-1996)

In his Confessions, St. Augustine draws a parallel between his own conversion to Christianity and Dido’s suicide in Vergil’s Aeneid. This paper traces the many connections between Dido’s suicide and Augustine’s conversion and suggests that his use of the conventions of her story would have appealed to pagans and thus furthered his effort to broaden the Christian faithful.


Introduction, Lawrence Wheeler Jan 1990

Introduction, Lawrence Wheeler

Anthós (1990-1996)

Provides an overview of the content of the issue. In addition, given that this is the first issue, provides the reasoning behind the creation of the journal as well as a broad overview of its genesis.


Intellectual Traditions As Predecessors To St. Augustine, Jennifer Lovell Jan 1990

Intellectual Traditions As Predecessors To St. Augustine, Jennifer Lovell

Anthós (1990-1996)

St. Augustine both explicitly and implicitly relied on existing intellectual traditions in the construction of his Confessions. He not only explicitly references Neoplatonic thought, he also implicitly constructs his argument around Neoplatonic ideals. He also used rhetorical and epic traditions to create his Christian Doctrine. By blending the teachings of the Bible with these traditions, this paper argues that St. Augustine effectively appealed to the intellectual elite.


Augustine's Contribution To Star Wars, Scott Franklin Jan 1990

Augustine's Contribution To Star Wars, Scott Franklin

Anthós (1990-1996)

The parallels between Augustine’s Confessions and the movie Star Wars might at first seem to be few and far between, but this paper argues for that the opposite in fact is true when viewed through the lens of rhetoric. This paper suggests that both the Confessions and Star Wars reframe traditional storylines for their own times. For Augustine it is the Bible and for Star Wars it is a traditional WWII Storyline.


The Story In Kierkegaard And Newman, Laura Gill Jan 1990

The Story In Kierkegaard And Newman, Laura Gill

Anthós (1990-1996)

Kierkegaard and Newman might seem strange bedfellows, but both draw on stories from the Bible to inform their moral and ethical arguments. This paper shows how both philosophers use storylines and figures from the Bible to "gain a better understanding of the concept of faith for themselves as well as others." While both philosophers use the storylines to differing ends, this paper argues that the understanding of both philosophies is enhanced by viewing them both through this particular lens.


Neoplatonic Influences In Augustine's Confessions, Shon H. Kraley Jan 1990

Neoplatonic Influences In Augustine's Confessions, Shon H. Kraley

Anthós (1990-1996)

Augustine wrote the Confession at a time when Christianity was still a small religion mostly populated with peasants and lower-class individuals. This paper argues that he actively utilized Neoplatonic philosophies and ideas in order to give credibility to his Christian doctrine. By doing so he accomplished the goal of expanding Christianity and appealing to the Intellegentsia.


A 'Meta-Constructive' Reading Of Ursula K. Le Guin's The Hand Of Darkness, Annette M. Matthews Jan 1990

A 'Meta-Constructive' Reading Of Ursula K. Le Guin's The Hand Of Darkness, Annette M. Matthews

Anthós (1990-1996)

Ursula K. le Guin’s fascinating and controversial novel, The Left Hand of Darkness, constructs meaning in multiple ways and at multiple levels. Using Todorov’s theory of “Reading as Construction,” this paper posits that le Guin’s novel requires the reader to be aware of their own reading in order to understand the text. The paper traces the idea of construction throughout the novel and ultimately suggests that the novel uses its differing points of view to force the reader to construct for themselves in order to understand the construction of the novel and its characters.


The Orchestration Of Nature's Writing Surfaces, Laurie M. O'Reilly Jan 1990

The Orchestration Of Nature's Writing Surfaces, Laurie M. O'Reilly

Anthós (1990-1996)

This articles stretches Derrida’s notion of writing by positing that writing itself might be thought of as "that which can be read or interpreted." This breaks the absolute bond between writing and human handicraft and suggests new ways of understanding the way we interpret natural phenomena. This paper traces this concept through numerous natural phenomena and suggests that perhaps the limits of meaning might have more to do with the interpreter’s range of understanding when it comes to natural gestures and "writings." In the end writing comes to be understood as durative, or has having duration. In this ...


The Loss Of Feminine Representation From The Aeneid To The Confessions, Merlin Douglass Jan 1990

The Loss Of Feminine Representation From The Aeneid To The Confessions, Merlin Douglass

Anthós (1990-1996)

This paper argues that “the change in the power of women from the time of Vergil to the time of Augustine altered the way in which they were represented” in the seminal texts of Vergil’s Aeneid and Augustine’s Confessions. Augustine’s Confessions have long been thought to be inspired by and echoing of the Aeneid. This paper, however, suggests that the striking loss of the female voice from the Aeneid to the Confessions is a result of the changed status of female power between the two time periods as well as a reminder of the purpose of the ...


Vergil's Aeneid: A Homeric Dichotomy?, David Dysert Jan 1990

Vergil's Aeneid: A Homeric Dichotomy?, David Dysert

Anthós (1990-1996)

This paper investigates the question of why scholars have traditionally labeled Vergil's Aeneid a "Homeric dichotomy." The Aeneid is often seen as a combination of the two great Homeric epics, the Odyssey and the Illiad, and is of criticized for its lack of transitions between the two. This paper argues that while the Aeneid certainly should be seen as a dichotomous work, its allusions stretch further than only to Homer’s epics. The paper traces a number of these allusions and suggests that the Aeneid should be viewed as a synthesis of Homer with other Greek traditions and epics ...