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Fighting For Their Lives: Why The Marginalized Irish From The 1840s-1910 Dominated American Prizefighting, Owen Marshall Dec 2018

Fighting For Their Lives: Why The Marginalized Irish From The 1840s-1910 Dominated American Prizefighting, Owen Marshall

Honors Program Theses and Projects

One of the most recognizable figures in the world during his lifetime, heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali, previously Cassius Clay and Cassius X, put his self-esteem on display with the simple declaration “I am the greatest.” This was a phrase he told himself long before he truly was the greatest, but he proved it to the world in 1964 when he defeated defending champion Sonny Liston. Upon knocking out his dangerous, violent, and cheating opponent, Ali whipped himself into a frenzy, as onlookers saw him fall over the ropes, scream at the ringside reporters who had previously doubted him, and …


When Art Becomes Political: An Analysis Of Irish Republican Murals 1981 To 2011, Maura Wester Dec 2018

When Art Becomes Political: An Analysis Of Irish Republican Murals 1981 To 2011, Maura Wester

History & Classics Undergraduate Theses

For nearly thirty years in the late twentieth century, sectarian violence between Irish Catholics and Ulster Protestants plagued Northern Ireland. Referred to as “the Troubles,” the violence officially lasted from 1969, when British troops were deployed to the region, until 1998, when the peace agreement, the Good Friday Agreement, was signed. Despite the changes in the government system, two things have not changed in Northern Ireland since the Good Friday Agreement: the pride both Loyalists and Republicans have in their cultures and their means to express this: murals. Traditionally a Loyalist practice dating back to late 1920s, Republican murals did …


Contemptible Cravens And Dumb Beasts: The Story Of The Wiggans Patch Massacre, Kevin Cranney Dec 2018

Contemptible Cravens And Dumb Beasts: The Story Of The Wiggans Patch Massacre, Kevin Cranney

History & Classics Undergraduate Theses

On the evening of December 9, 1875, around forty masked men broke into the boardinghouse of the elderly widow Margaret O’Donnell in Wiggans Patch, a mining town outside of Mahanoy City, and killed her pregnant daughter and her son, an alleged Molly Maguire. The perpetrators of the Wiggans Patch Massacre literally got away with murder. One of the most brutal crimes of a particularly violent era was soon forgotten, especially when the Molly Maguire trials began the following month. How did this happen? Why was the Wiggans Patch Massacre forgotten when within the next few years (1876-1879) twenty men were …


“Only A Passing Idiocy”: The Ku Klux Klan In Maine State Politics, Erin Best Dec 2018

“Only A Passing Idiocy”: The Ku Klux Klan In Maine State Politics, Erin Best

Honors Program Theses and Projects

During the late the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, French Canadians migrated to the United States to fill existing labor gaps in New England’s textile mills. By the 1920s, French Canadians and Franco-Americans dominated textile labor in Maine. Despite its general rural cultural landscape, the modernism of the 1920s did come to influence the lived-experience of Maine’s French-speaking population. Urban centers like Lewiston-Auburn, Portland, and Bangor were urban-industrial towns that tended to be oppositional to the state’s more rural and conservative demographic. This sparked a general counter-movement among Maine’s conservative Protestant population. Similar to other rural regions in the United …


Deconstructing “Jack”: How Jack The Ripper Became More Fiction Than Fact, Erin Thompson Dec 2018

Deconstructing “Jack”: How Jack The Ripper Became More Fiction Than Fact, Erin Thompson

Augsburg Honors Review

Serial killers have become as much a part of popular culture as athletes and celebrities in the modern age. However, no killer in history remains as identifiable in today’s culture as Jack the Ripper. His name appears in over one hundred books, films, and television shows despite the fact that the murders he committed and the subsequent investigations remain relatively unclear. Regardless, for over a century scholars and historians alike have attempted to understand and unmask Jack the Ripper. While the identity of this elusive killer remains unknown, the stories that Jack the Ripper inspired have led to the creation …


Sets And Sensibilities: The Excavation Of Ideology In Upstate New York, Christopher P. Barton, Kyle Somerville Dec 2018

Sets And Sensibilities: The Excavation Of Ideology In Upstate New York, Christopher P. Barton, Kyle Somerville

Northeast Historical Archaeology

A growing literature on the archaeology of farmsteads and rural domestic sites has examined commodity consumption as the means by which rural families created and maintained social networks and identities. During the nineteenth century, rural areas were increasingly influenced by the practices and values of the urban middle classes, although not every farmstead would, or could, participate in the same way. This paper examines a matching teacup and saucer recovered from the Spring House, a former commercial farmstead and hotel located southeastern Monroe County, Western New York State. The tea set is decorated with transfer print depictions of Faith, Hope, …


The Rise And Fall Of American Queensware 1807-1822, Rebecca L. White, Meta F. Janowitz, George D. Cress, Thomas J. Kutys, Samuel A. Pickard Dec 2018

The Rise And Fall Of American Queensware 1807-1822, Rebecca L. White, Meta F. Janowitz, George D. Cress, Thomas J. Kutys, Samuel A. Pickard

Northeast Historical Archaeology

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This article examines the history of several manufacturers of American queensware in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and beyond. Our research reveals that efforts to produce queensware were more extensive and widespread than previously thought. This survey expanded as we discovered references to contemporary queensware potteries in other parts of the United States during the first two decades of the 19th century. In all, 14 queensware-manufacturing ventures are identified and described from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio, what is now West Virginia, Vermont, and New Hampshire. Much of this research is drawn from period newspaper notices, advertisements, and surviving personal correspondence. The period …


Kawamoto, Eric, Cosette Holmes, Tiana Cope-Ferland Nov 2018

Kawamoto, Eric, Cosette Holmes, Tiana Cope-Ferland

Querying the Past: LGBTQ Maine Oral History Project Collection

This interview with Eric Kawamoto reveals a journey of self-discovery in Chicago, L.A., Boston, and Portland; an intersection between being Asian American and being queer; and survival of AIDS as a result of reserve. Kawamoto places these personal themes among his account of the LGBTQ+ and Asian American communities’ overarching struggles, like the fight for domestic partnership benefits, representation of Asian American gay men, and spreading awareness about Japanese American internment in California.

Citation

Please cite as: Querying the Past: LGBTQ Maine Oral History Project Collection, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer+ Collection, Jean Byers Sampson Center for Diversity in …


The Continuing Relevance Of C. Wright Mills: His Approach To Research And What We Can Learn From It, John E. Miller Nov 2018

The Continuing Relevance Of C. Wright Mills: His Approach To Research And What We Can Learn From It, John E. Miller

Studies in Midwestern History

C. Wright Mills (1916-1962), remembered primarily for his 1956 book, The Power Elite, and for his 1960 essay “Letter to the New Left,” which helped launch the rising New Left in the America of the 1960s, was a major American sociologist, but he also had much to teach historians. Although he focused his research on national and global subjects, students and scholars of regionalism can also learn much from his wide-ranging, critical approach. Like all good sociologists, Mills always assumed that historical context was an essential element of any adequate analysis of society, economics, and politics. Born in Texas, …


Searching For Compromise: Missouri Congressman John Richard Barret’S Fight To Save The Union, Nicholas Sacco Nov 2018

Searching For Compromise: Missouri Congressman John Richard Barret’S Fight To Save The Union, Nicholas Sacco

The Confluence (2009-2020)

In the months leading to the Civil War, Missouri politics were turbulent. Some supported union, others not. John Richard Barret fought to keep Missouri and the state’s Democrats loyal to the union.


Fall/Winter 2018/2019, Full Issue Nov 2018

Fall/Winter 2018/2019, Full Issue

The Confluence (2009-2020)

No abstract provided.


The Shanachie, Volume 30, Number 4, Connecticut Irish-American Historical Society Nov 2018

The Shanachie, Volume 30, Number 4, Connecticut Irish-American Historical Society

The Shanachie (CTIAHS)

This 16-page issue of our newsletter commemorates the 100th anniversary of the armistice which ended World War I just 100 years ago.

Contents: Connecticut's Irish in World War I --Hartford Red Cross nurse served amid bombardments --Sgt. Stubby and Cpl. Conroy went off to war --With roots in Canada, Lafferty got into the fight early --Picketing White House in wartime: patriotic or treason? --Ansonia native among nation’s first female sailors --Medals and monument honor Fair Haven Irish lads --Daring young men in their flying machines --Knights of Columbus offered soup and solace for friend and foe alike --Sailor from Roscommon …


The Pin-Up Boy Of The Symphony: St. Louis And The Rise Of Leonard Bernstein, Kenneth H. Winn Nov 2018

The Pin-Up Boy Of The Symphony: St. Louis And The Rise Of Leonard Bernstein, Kenneth H. Winn

The Confluence (2009-2020)

Much has been written about Leonard Bernstein to commemorate the 100th anniversary of his birth. St. Louis and the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra played a key role in Bernstein’s early career—including performing the first work by Bernstein to be recorded.


The Germans And Swiss At The Battle Of The Little Bighorn 1876, Albert Winkler Nov 2018

The Germans And Swiss At The Battle Of The Little Bighorn 1876, Albert Winkler

Faculty Publications

The purpose of this study is to examine the Germans and the Swiss who participated in the Battle of the Little Bighorn to understand who they were, to assess their motives for joining the cavalry, and to appraise their experience in battle.


After Faith, Hope, And Love: The Unique Divergence Of Asceticism By Gregory The Great And Maximus The Confessor, Caleb N. Zuiderveen Oct 2018

After Faith, Hope, And Love: The Unique Divergence Of Asceticism By Gregory The Great And Maximus The Confessor, Caleb N. Zuiderveen

Theses and Dissertations

In the late sixth and early seventh centuries, asceticism continued as a frequent expression of Christian devotion. Despite communications between the Eastern and Western Churches and a common patristic foundation, theology in the East and West during this time diverged on the results of asceticism. This paper explores this divergence by examining two theologians, Gregory the Great and Maximus the Confessor. Current scholarship has examined Gregory the Great and Maximus the Confessor on their own, yet the dialogue between each tradition and its implications remains understudied. Thus, this study contextualizes Gregory the Great’s On the Song of Songs and Maximus …


The Plight Of Wage-Earning Women In Peoria, 1905-1915, Cheryl Kay Fogler Oct 2018

The Plight Of Wage-Earning Women In Peoria, 1905-1915, Cheryl Kay Fogler

Theses and Dissertations

This thesis examines the conditions of wage-earning women in Peoria, Illinois, during the first two decades of the twentieth century. I present the plight of wage-earning women as well as the well-intended efforts of both local and national crusaders who helped the working women of Peoria survive and in some cases overcome hardships.


Ligon, Lucy Ann (Parker) Robbins, 1833-1891 - Letters To (Sc 3278), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2018

Ligon, Lucy Ann (Parker) Robbins, 1833-1891 - Letters To (Sc 3278), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid and typescripts (Click on "Additional Files" below) for Manuscripts Small Collection 3278. Letters to Lucy Ann Robbins Ligon, the daughter of Fulton County, Kentucky judge Josiah Parker and his wife Lucy A. Parker, written while she lived in Crittenden County, Arkansas with her late husband’s brother, and in Hickman, Kentucky after her remarriage. Lucy’s parents relay news of her siblings and of pre-Civil War Hickman, and at the outbreak of war dramatically describe the division of loyalties, the townspeople’s fear and uncertainty as invasion threatens from the North, the enlistment of local men, two destructive fires, economic conditions, …


Anti-Sabbatarianism In Antebellum America: The Christian Quarrel Over The Sanctity Of Sunday, Kathryn Kaslow Oct 2018

Anti-Sabbatarianism In Antebellum America: The Christian Quarrel Over The Sanctity Of Sunday, Kathryn Kaslow

Theses and Dissertations

In the first half of the 1800s, American Christians posed fundamental questions about the role of faith in daily life by debating blue laws, which restricted Sunday travel, mail delivery, and recreational activities on the basis of the Fourth Commandment. Historians have largely focused on how pro-blue law Christians, or Sabbatarians, answered these questions. They also present anti-Sabbatarian concerns as socially, economically, or politically motivated, largely ignoring religion. However, an examination of religious periodicals, convention reports, correspondence, and petitions shows that many anti-Sabbatarians did indeed frame their arguments in theological terms. Case studies from various faith traditions over four decades …


Téacsúil Fionnachtain, Alan B. Delozier Sep 2018

Téacsúil Fionnachtain, Alan B. Delozier

Critical Inquiries Into Irish Studies

“Textual Discovery,” by the Seton Hall University Library Archivist, Alan Delozier, is presented to pique interest in the obscure, yet unique works in Irish language, literature, and history that have been largely forgotten over time. Articles will cover different subject areas, authors, themes, and eras related to the depth and consequence of the Gaeilge experience in its varied forms.


O’Casey Vs. Sheehy-Skeffington: Tragicomedy In The Plough And The Stars And The Feminist Protest, Martha Carpentier Sep 2018

O’Casey Vs. Sheehy-Skeffington: Tragicomedy In The Plough And The Stars And The Feminist Protest, Martha Carpentier

Critical Inquiries Into Irish Studies

Martha C. Carpentier is Professor of English at Seton Hall University in New Jersey, where she teaches courses in 20th-century British and Irish literature. Most recently, she is the editor of Joycean Legacies (Palgrave MacMillan 2015) and author of articles on James Joyce, George Orwell, and Graham Greene that have appeared in Mosaic and Joyce Studies Annual. She is a co-editor of Critical Inquiries Into Irish Studies.


Jay Flippin Collection, Department Of Music, Theatre & Dance, Russell Jay Flippin Sep 2018

Jay Flippin Collection, Department Of Music, Theatre & Dance, Russell Jay Flippin

University Archives Finding Aids

No abstract provided.


Diagnosing The Will To Suffer: Lovesickness In The Medical And Literary Traditions, Jane Shmidt Sep 2018

Diagnosing The Will To Suffer: Lovesickness In The Medical And Literary Traditions, Jane Shmidt

Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Throughout Western medical history, unconsummated, unreturned, or otherwise failed love was believed to generate a disorder of the mind and body that manifested in physiological and psychological symptoms. This study traces the medical and literary history of lovesickness from antiquity through the 19th century, emphasizing significant moments in the development of the medical discourse on love. The project is part of the recent academic focus on the intersection between the humanities and the medical sciences, and it situates literary texts in concurrent medical and philosophical debates on afflictions of the psyche. By contextualizing the fictional works within the scientific …


Xavier University Newswire, Xavier University (Cincinnati, Ohio) Aug 2018

Xavier University Newswire, Xavier University (Cincinnati, Ohio)

All Xavier Student Newspapers

No abstract provided.


Welcoming Strangers: Race, Religion, And Ethnicity In German Lutheran Ontario And Missouri, 1939-1970, Elliot Worsfold Aug 2018

Welcoming Strangers: Race, Religion, And Ethnicity In German Lutheran Ontario And Missouri, 1939-1970, Elliot Worsfold

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

This dissertation examines how German-American and German-Canadian Lutherans in St. Louis, Missouri, and Waterloo County, Ontario, constructed their ethnic identities from the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939 to 1970. Did German Lutherans understand their ethnicity as an identity to overcome, or as an identity worth preserving? What role did religion and race play in how they constructed their ethnic identities? It argues that German Lutherans in the Missouri and Canada Synods constructed a hybrid identity that sought to balance their competing ethnic, religious, racial, and national identities. It charts their experiences negotiating discrimination during the Second World …


"By The Dear, Immortal Memory Of Washington"/The Baptists, Culture, And The Law In Eighteenth-Century Virginia, Douglas Breton Jul 2018

"By The Dear, Immortal Memory Of Washington"/The Baptists, Culture, And The Law In Eighteenth-Century Virginia, Douglas Breton

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

"By the Dear, Immortal Memory of Washington" Americans have long used the Founding Fathers as symbols of patriotism, invoking their names and using their images whenever they wish to demonstrate that a particular way of thinking or acting is true to American ideals. The vague patriotic image of the founders tends to eclipse their actual character, allowing diverse and competing movements to all use them. This has been especially true of George Washington, who long enjoyed a preeminent and almost mythic status among the founders. During the 1860s, both secessionists and unionists claimed him as their own in order to …


Stonehill Alumni Magazine Summer/Fall 2018, Stonehill College Office Of Communications And Media Relations Jul 2018

Stonehill Alumni Magazine Summer/Fall 2018, Stonehill College Office Of Communications And Media Relations

Stonehill Alumni Magazine

This issue of the magazine includes the following features:

  • A Good Sign “What am I getting myself into?” is what Melanie (Malone) O’Neil ’99 first thought when she left her full-time job to turn a hand-painted sign hobby into one of the country’s fastest-growing companies. BY KIM LAWRENCE
  • Telling Stories During oral history sessions with 50th Reunion classes, alumni share all sorts of stories, from pranks and hijinks to protests and reflections. BY KIM LAWRENCE, NICOLE (TOURANEGEAU) CASPER ’95 AND JONATHAN GREEN ’10
  • One Gift Sparks a Lifetime of Giving Named after Thomas ’69 and Donna (Jermyn) ’70 May, the …


Re-Mapping Tacoma's Pre-War Japantown: Living On The Tideflats, Lisa Hoffman, Mary Hanneman, Sarah Pyle Jul 2018

Re-Mapping Tacoma's Pre-War Japantown: Living On The Tideflats, Lisa Hoffman, Mary Hanneman, Sarah Pyle

Conflux

This article, drawing on oral histories with Nisei, addresses the dearth of publications about pre-WWII Japanese life in the urban U.S. and provides evidence of Japanese immigrants’ active presence in the lumber industry and on Tacoma’s tideflats. This is important not only for Tacoma’s history and a fuller accounting of the major industries that shaped the south Puget Sound region, but also because Japanese contributions to early industrial development are often overlooked. The oral history narratives also stretch the boundaries of what has been depicted as a densely-connected and lively Japanese community in the downtown core. Also, stories of moving …


Traces Volume 46, Number 2, Kentucky Library Research Collections Jul 2018

Traces Volume 46, Number 2, Kentucky Library Research Collections

Traces, the Southern Central Kentucky, Barren County Genealogical Newsletter

Traces, the South Central Kentucky Genealogical Society's quarterly newsletter, was first published in 1973. The Society changed its name in 2016 to the Barren County Historical Society. The publication features compiled genealogies, articles on local history, single-family studies and unpublished source materials related to this area.


Racial Constructions And Activism Within Graphic Literature. An Analysis Of Hank Mccoy, The Beast, Juan D. Alfonso Jun 2018

Racial Constructions And Activism Within Graphic Literature. An Analysis Of Hank Mccoy, The Beast, Juan D. Alfonso

FIU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Through a post-modern lens, I will primarily focus on comics books published by Marvel Comics to demonstrate the myriad of ways in which graphic literature is used as a subversive tool of sociopolitical discourse. I will demonstrate this by deconstructing and redefining the role of myth as a means of transferring ethical practices through societies and the ways in which graphic literature serves this function within the space of a modern and increasingly atheistic society. The thesis first demonstrates how the American Civil Rights Movement was metaphorically translated and depicted to the pages of Marvel’s X-Men comics to expose its …


"For All Such, A Country Is Provided": Choctaw Removal, Slave Trading, And Law In Southwestern Mississippi, 1800–1841, Anthony Albey Soliman Jun 2018

"For All Such, A Country Is Provided": Choctaw Removal, Slave Trading, And Law In Southwestern Mississippi, 1800–1841, Anthony Albey Soliman

Master's Theses

At the beginning of the nineteenth century there were few white settlers in the Mississippi Territory. Over the course of two decades, the United States used treaties to force the indigenous inhabitants, the Choctaw, out of this area by the United States to lands west of the Mississippi River. The United States’ goal in the region was to create a plantation economy in the Mississippi Valley based on the production of short-staple cotton sustained by enslaved African American labor. Focusing on the removal of the Choctaw and the subsequent installation of a plantation regime in the Mississippi Valley, this thesis …