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Sacrificing Our Daughters: Changing Perceptions Of Prostitution In Iowa, 1880-1915, Hope C. Mitchell Jun 2016

Sacrificing Our Daughters: Changing Perceptions Of Prostitution In Iowa, 1880-1915, Hope C. Mitchell

Hope Mitchell

In response to the urbanization and industrialization that occurred throughout the nineteenth century, people across the country began to reevaluate their perceptions of prostitution during the later part of the nineteenth century and into the early part of the twentieth century. As young women began to migrate to cities looking for factory and domestic work, parents became concerned by the dangers that their daughters would face in the city. This concern was especially felt within the Midwest, where farm families were heavily dependent upon the labors of their daughters. As they transitioned into the later part of the nineteenth century ...


Navigating Body, Class, And Disability In The Life Of Agnes Burns Wieck, Caroline Waldron Merithew May 2016

Navigating Body, Class, And Disability In The Life Of Agnes Burns Wieck, Caroline Waldron Merithew

Caroline Merithew

The concerns expressed in Burns Wieck’s letter to Hapgood typify many of the issues that occupied her during the course of her life. She, like many Americans in the early twentieth century, thought that there were economic disparities as well as great cultural divisions between the working and middle classes in a capitalist system. Burns Wieck worried about how nature and environment shaped physical and emotional existence for her as a woman and as a worker.4 A question she asked about childbirth in her letter—“Why, oh why, can’t they find some way to humanize that experience ...


Making It In Maine: Stories Of Jewish Life In Small-Town America, David Freidenreich Dec 2014

Making It In Maine: Stories Of Jewish Life In Small-Town America, David Freidenreich

David M. Freidenreich

There are countless stories of Jewish life in Maine, stretching back 200 years. These are stories worth telling not only for their enjoyment value but also because we can learn a great deal from them. They reflect the challenges that confronted members of an immigrant community as they sought to become true Mainers, as well as the challenges this ethnic group now faces as a result of its successful integration. The experiences of Jews in Maine, moreover, encapsulate in many ways the experiences of small-town Jews throughout New England and the United States. Their stories offer glimpses into the changing ...


Ideology In Urban South Vietnam, 1950-1975 (Dissertation), Tuan Hoang Mar 2013

Ideology In Urban South Vietnam, 1950-1975 (Dissertation), Tuan Hoang

Tuan Hoang

No abstract provided.


Act 2: Tastes In Common (1938-2002), James Smith Allen Mar 2012

Act 2: Tastes In Common (1938-2002), James Smith Allen

James Smith Allen

Act 2 of "A Privileged Past" explores the history of one family – the author’s family of origin – from its inception in 1938 until its dissolution in 2002. Tracing the Allens in Silver Spring, Maryland – a wealthy suburb of Washington, DC – this chapter highlights the family’s steady relative decline in socio-economic status in the wake of the New Deal that, at least until 1980, promoted the development of a middle class much more modest than what the Allens represented. The dominant metaphor in this account is that of taste and the shared rituals of families and friends eating together.


Act 1: The Ocean Smell (1624-1938), James Smith Allen Mar 2012

Act 1: The Ocean Smell (1624-1938), James Smith Allen

James Smith Allen

The first act of "A Privileged Past" recounts the history of four families – the Allens of Manchester, Massachusetts; the Roomes of New York, New York; the Kruegers of Newark, New Jersey; and the Smiths also of Newark – since their arrival from Europe (the first two in the seventeenth century, the latter two in the nineteenth). These people brought with them distinct ethnic identities, which helped define the communities they joined, and in some cases led, as immigrants to the new world. Their experiences across and by the Atlantic Ocean are captured by this chapter’s prevailing figure of speech, that ...


How The British Gun Control Program Precipitated The American Revolution, David Kopel Dec 2011

How The British Gun Control Program Precipitated The American Revolution, David Kopel

David B Kopel

Abstract: This Article chronologically reviews the British gun control which precipitated the American Revolution: the 1774 import ban on firearms and gun powder; the 1774-75 confiscations of firearms and gun powder, from individuals and from local governments; and the use of violence to effectuate the confiscations. It was these events which changed a situation of rising political tension into a shooting war. Each of these British abuses provides insights into the scope of the modern Second Amendment.

From the events of 1774-75, we can discern that import restrictions or bans on firearms or ammunition are constitutionally suspect — at least if ...


The Double Life Of St. Louis: Narratives Of Origins And Maturity In Wade’S Urban Frontier, Adam Arenson Aug 2009

The Double Life Of St. Louis: Narratives Of Origins And Maturity In Wade’S Urban Frontier, Adam Arenson

Adam Arenson

A half-century after Richard C. Wade's landmark history The Urban Frontier: The Rise of Western Cities, 1790-1830, this retrospective essay considers the development of St. Louis in relation to evolving notions of the frontier as a space of intercultural encounter, and the maturation of a city economically in relation to its cultural and political conflicts. It reviews the scholarship on the city of St. Louis since Wade wrote, and suggests new avenues in the city's history.


The Murderous Insanity Of Love: Sex, Madness, And The Law In The 19th Century, Russell Franks Dec 2004

The Murderous Insanity Of Love: Sex, Madness, And The Law In The 19th Century, Russell Franks

Russell M. Franks

The late 19th century was a time of dynamic change for the United States. High ideals, progressive reform movements, accelerated industrial expansion, explosive immigration rates, and an increase in urban growth all characterized the Gilded Age of America.

This paper will examine the factors and social conditions that revolutionized how abnormal sexual and gender behavior was interpreted as insanity in and out of the courtroom during this Gilded Age.


Rosebloom And Pure White, Or So It Seemed, Mary Niall Mitchell Aug 2002

Rosebloom And Pure White, Or So It Seemed, Mary Niall Mitchell

Mary Niall Mitchell

No abstract provided.


“Slavery, Racist Violence, American Apartheid: The Case For Reparations.”, Sundiata Cha-Jua Dec 2000

“Slavery, Racist Violence, American Apartheid: The Case For Reparations.”, Sundiata Cha-Jua

Sundiata K Cha-Jua

LIKE THE PROVERBIAL COMET, over the last year the demand for reparations has blazed across the political skyline. Few current issues burn as brightly among African Americans. The movement's surging growth has predictably provoked renewed opposition. Recently critiques of the escalating reparations movement have come from two very different sources: Adolph L. Reed, Jr., a justly-respected African American radical, and David Horowitz, an unrespected neoconservative ideologue. This paper has three interconnected objectives: (1) to explicate Reed's and Horowitz's arguments; (2) to contextualize their arguments; and (3) to suggest an alternative reading of the reparations movement. The first ...


Working Toward A "Shared Authority" In The Discipline And Content Of Public Hlstory: A Case Study, Ruth Bryan Dec 1998

Working Toward A "Shared Authority" In The Discipline And Content Of Public Hlstory: A Case Study, Ruth Bryan

Ruth E. Bryan

This paper explores the meaning of “public history” using Michael Frisch’s concept of a “shared authority” (A Shared Authority, 1990) through a case study of the reviews of two edited and published oral histories, Outside the Magic Circle: The Autobiography of Virginia Foster Durr (ed. Hollinger F. Barnard, 1985) and All is Never Said: The Narrative of Odette Harper Hines (ed. Judith Rollins, 1995). The result is that although history can be produced by historians with the public and about the public, public history cannot be truly an authoritative history (making explicit connections between facts, narrative, and the purpose ...