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Tip O’Neill: Irish-American Representative Man (2003), Shaun O’Connell Nov 2015

Tip O’Neill: Irish-American Representative Man (2003), Shaun O’Connell

New England Journal of Public Policy

Thomas P. “Tip” O’Neill, Man of the House as he aptly called himself in his 1987 memoir, stood as the quintessential Irish-American representative man for half of the twentieth century. O’Neill, often misunderstood as a parochial, Irish Catholic party pol, was a shrewd, sensitive, and idealistic man who came to stand for a more inclusive and expansive sense of his region, his party, and his church. O’Neill’s impressive presence both embodied the clichés of the Irish-American character and transcended its stereotypes by articulating a noble vision of inspired duty, determined responsibility, and joy in living. There ...


Irish Women's Immigration To The United States After The Potato Famine, 1860-1900, Mackenzie S. Flanagan May 2015

Irish Women's Immigration To The United States After The Potato Famine, 1860-1900, Mackenzie S. Flanagan

Senior Theses and Capstone Projects

Thousands of single Irish women emigrated to the United States after the Great Potato Famine. These women left Ireland because social conditions in Ireland limited their opportunities for fulfilling lives. Changes in marriage and inheritance patterns lowered the status of unmarried women and made marriage increasingly unlikely. As a result, many women emigrated to the United States and, once here, worked, used their wages to help others emigrate, and most eventually married. Irish culture facilitated this mass migration by promoting the autonomy of single women yet limiting their options. Emigration did not signify a break with their Irish culture and ...


The Irish Hunger And Its Alignments With The 1948 Genocide Convention, Larissa M. Banitt Apr 2015

The Irish Hunger And Its Alignments With The 1948 Genocide Convention, Larissa M. Banitt

Young Historians Conference

The Irish Hunger of the mid nineteenth century began when a potato blight ruined most of Ireland's crop. While this was indeed a natural crisis, Britain's ineffective response exacerbated the sugaring the Irish endured. Widespread discrimination of the Irish, economic and moral ideologies all contributed to the British government's reaction to the famine. This paper evaluates how British adherence to these ideologies increased Irish suffering and aligns with the definition of genocide as defined by the 1948 Genocide Convention


The Shanachie, Volume 27, Number 2, Connecticut Irish-American Historical Society Jan 2015

The Shanachie, Volume 27, Number 2, Connecticut Irish-American Historical Society

The Shanachie (CIAHS)

Like most Connecticut communities, Wallingford has been the home of a large number of natives of Ireland and people of Irish descent. Settled in 1670, the town attracted Irish immigrants with employment opportunities in industry, transportation and domestic service. This issue of The Shanachie features the stories of just two of the many Irish of Wallingford.