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Book Reviews, Florida Historical Society May 2022

Book Reviews, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Balsera and May, eds., La Florida: Five Hundred Years of Hispanic Presence. by Erin W. Stone; Little, The Origins of Southern Evangelicalism: Religious Revivalism in the South Carolina Lowcountry, 1670-1760. by Edward Bond; Murray, The Charleston Orphan House: Children's Lives in the First Public Orphanage in America. by Monique Bourque; Gleeson, The Green and the Gray: The Irish in the Confederate States of America. by Ian Delahanty; Harris and Berry, eds., Slavery and Freedom in Savannah. by Michael Benjamin; Monroe, Mary Ann Carroll, First Lady of the Highwaymen. by Paul S. George; Dorsey, Fourth Down in Dunbar. by Richard ...


The Evolution Of Frederick Douglass’ Slavery Debate: An Examination Of His Rhetoric, Jacquelyn Torres May 2022

The Evolution Of Frederick Douglass’ Slavery Debate: An Examination Of His Rhetoric, Jacquelyn Torres

Political Science & International Studies | Senior Theses

From leading the Abolitionist movement to holding a lecture tour abroad, Frederick Douglass is well known for championing racial justice and leaving a legacy of exposing the evils of slavery. Scholars have primarily focused on Douglass’ actions as an abolitionist but not on the evolution of his thinking about slavery. While Douglass’ actions, such as in the Abolitionist movement, are discussed in-depth amongst academic circles, there is oversight regarding looking at his arguments about slavery. Douglass’ rhetoric was impacted by his experiences traveling abroad when he gave lectures in the British Isles between 1845-1847. This thesis examines speeches given by ...


The Failure Of Religious Conversion: Mormon Missionaries In Ireland Between 1850 And 1870, Hadleigh F. Weber Apr 2022

The Failure Of Religious Conversion: Mormon Missionaries In Ireland Between 1850 And 1870, Hadleigh F. Weber

Student Research Projects

Ireland in 1850 was full of empty potato fields and people that were closer to death than their next meal. The country was in the throes of one of the worst famines in history. The Irish Potato Famine decreased the population of Ireland by 20-25% between 1845 and 1851. Despite the bleak time in the country's history, missionaries of different religions continued to flock to Ireland in hopes of converting the dwindling population. Missionaries were almost always met with resistance from both the largely Catholic population and the minority Protestant population. These denominations had a long history of conflict ...


Irish Potato Famine: 1845-51, George Brown Iii Jan 2022

Irish Potato Famine: 1845-51, George Brown Iii

The Exposition

No abstract provided.


James Mahony (C.1816-1859): The Illustrated London News, Niamh Ann Kelly Jul 2021

James Mahony (C.1816-1859): The Illustrated London News, Niamh Ann Kelly

Books/Book Chapters

No abstract provided.


Session 1: Panel 1: Presenter 1 (Paper) -- “To Hell Or Connaught:” How British Colonizers Both Caused And Benefitted From The Irish Potato Famine, Ruby Lewis May 2021

Session 1: Panel 1: Presenter 1 (Paper) -- “To Hell Or Connaught:” How British Colonizers Both Caused And Benefitted From The Irish Potato Famine, Ruby Lewis

Young Historians Conference

The Irish potato famine is well-known for the suffering and death it inflicted upon the masses of Irish peasantry between 1845 and 1848. The famine is often remembered and mourned as the tragic but unavoidable result of natural circumstances, and the blight that swept through the potato crop year after year is attributed as the sole cause of starvation. This misrepresentation of the famine’s history ignores the role of the British colonizer state in establishing conditions in Ireland that led to famine and exacerbating the suffering of the Irish through neglect. This paper explores the role of the British ...


Immigration After The Great Famine: A Case Study Of The Passengers Of The S.S. Canadian, Erin Kelly May 2021

Immigration After The Great Famine: A Case Study Of The Passengers Of The S.S. Canadian, Erin Kelly

Masters Theses, 2020-current

From 1879 to 1881 Western Ireland suffered a famine that left one million people in a state of destitution. To assist the starving, impoverished farming communities that were scattered across the region English Quaker and philanthropist James Hack Tuke successfully pitched the Tuke Emigration Scheme to the UK government in 1882, lasting through 1884. While historians of Irish immigration have recently begun to research famines other than the Great Famine, very few have delved more deeply into this particular scheme. Of those who have, including Christine Kinnealy and Gerard Moran, analysis has been limited to the perspective of Ireland and ...


A Comparative Analysis Of Bohemian And Irish Immigration During The Antebellum Period, Emily Suchan Apr 2021

A Comparative Analysis Of Bohemian And Irish Immigration During The Antebellum Period, Emily Suchan

Honors Projects

Compare and Contrast the immigration experience of an Irish and Bohemian (Czech) immigrant. This essay describes the history of both regions and analyzes the political and economic stressors for immigration during the second half of the nineteenth century. This essay specifically follows the Irish Famine immigrants and the Czechs who settled in Cleveland, OH


An Interdisciplinary Approach To Historic Diet And Foodways: The Foodcult Project, Susan Flavin, Meriel Mcclatchie, Janet Montgomery, Fiona Beglane, Julie Dunne, Ellen Ocarroll, Andrew Parnell Feb 2021

An Interdisciplinary Approach To Historic Diet And Foodways: The Foodcult Project, Susan Flavin, Meriel Mcclatchie, Janet Montgomery, Fiona Beglane, Julie Dunne, Ellen Ocarroll, Andrew Parnell

European Journal of Food Drink and Society

This research note introduces the methodology of the FoodCult Project, with the aim of stimulating discussion regarding the interdisciplinary potential for historical food studies. The project represents the first major attempt to establish both the fundamentals of everyday diet, and the cultural ‘meaning’ of food and drink in early modern Ireland, c 1550-1650. This was a period of major economic development, unprecedented intercultural contact, but also of conquest, colonisation and war, and the study focusses on Ireland as a case-study for understanding the role of food in a complex society. Moving beyond the colonial narrative of Irish social and economic ...


Famine In Art - Imagery, Influences And Exhibition In Mid-20th-Century Ireland, Niamh Ann Kelly Jul 2020

Famine In Art - Imagery, Influences And Exhibition In Mid-20th-Century Ireland, Niamh Ann Kelly

Books/Book Chapters

No abstract provided.


Imaging The Great Irish Famine: Representing Dispossession In Visual Culture, Preface & Introduction, Niamh Ann Kelly Jul 2020

Imaging The Great Irish Famine: Representing Dispossession In Visual Culture, Preface & Introduction, Niamh Ann Kelly

Books/Book Chapters

Niamh Ann Kelly's lavishly illustrated book throws new light on the visual culture commemorative of hunger, famine and dispossession in mid-nineteenth-century Ireland. Located within the discipline of International Memorial Studies, the text and images both challenge and extend our understanding of Famine history. Examining the visual culture since the time of the Famine until the present, Kelly asks, how do we view, experience and represent the past in the present? To what extent does the viewer insert themselves in this complex process? Is there such a thing as ethical spectatorship? Kelly’s sophisticated yet sympathetic study of the “grievous ...


The Irish Republican Army: An Examination Of Imperialism, Terror, And Just War Theory, Avery R. Barboza Jun 2020

The Irish Republican Army: An Examination Of Imperialism, Terror, And Just War Theory, Avery R. Barboza

Master's Theses

Analysis of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and their actions in the 1970s and 1980s offer insight into their use of just war theory in their conflict with the British government and ultra-loyalist Protestant forces in Northern Ireland. The historiography of Irish history is defined by its phases of nationalism, revisionism, and anti-revisionism that cloud the historical narrative of imperialism and insurgency in the North. Applying just war theory to this history offers a more nuanced understanding of the conflict of the Troubles and the I.R.A.’s usage of this framework in their ideology that guided their terrorism ...


An Anthology Of Irish Nationalism: Music, Verse, Speeches, And Interviews Regarding The Betterment Of The State Of Ireland, From The Sixth Century Until The Liberation Of Ireland, Sofia J. Gilmore-Montero May 2020

An Anthology Of Irish Nationalism: Music, Verse, Speeches, And Interviews Regarding The Betterment Of The State Of Ireland, From The Sixth Century Until The Liberation Of Ireland, Sofia J. Gilmore-Montero

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

When I started this project because in my extensive amount of research into Irish literature, I found that the common theme in many of the works was nationalism and the desire to have a free state. I could not find any books that focused on nationalistic literature over the lengthy history of Ireland, only collections that pertained to a specific time period. This thesis project proposes introductory material and a potential table of contents to an anthology that would be centered around the theme of Irish nationalism in literature between the ninth century and the liberation of Ireland. It covers ...


Ulster, Georgia, And The Civil War: Stories Of Variation, William Loveless May 2020

Ulster, Georgia, And The Civil War: Stories Of Variation, William Loveless

Honors Theses

Ulster, Georgia, and The Civil War: Stories of Variation explores the lives of 13 men from Northern Ireland who immigrated to the American South and fought for the Confederacy. The author pursues the stories of each man’s life in order to have a more thorough understanding of what life looked like for Irish/Ulster immigrants in the South during the 19th century. By looking at the lives of the men in Ulster, their first experiences in the United States, their experiences in the Civil War, and their lives following the war, the author identifies more variation than consistent ...


A Review Of English's Paddy Whacked, Caitlin Eileen Docherty Jul 2019

A Review Of English's Paddy Whacked, Caitlin Eileen Docherty

The Histories

No abstract provided.


Of Life And History, Vol. 2 (May 2019) May 2019

Of Life And History, Vol. 2 (May 2019)

Of Life and History

No abstract provided.


Cover Photo: 1907 - College Of The Holy Cross Commencement Parade, Brett A. Cotter May 2019

Cover Photo: 1907 - College Of The Holy Cross Commencement Parade, Brett A. Cotter

Of Life and History

This essay provides context for a photograph of the College of the Holy Cross 1907 Commencement Parade, which features an image of James Cardinal Gibbons. Cardinal Gibbons, a prominent religious figure of the time, was the Commencement speaker that year.

The photograph was published as the cover art for Of History and Life, vol.2 by permission of the College of the Holy Cross Archives and Special Collections.


Bare-Knuckle Prize Fighting, Elliot Gorn Mar 2019

Bare-Knuckle Prize Fighting, Elliot Gorn

History: Faculty Publications and Other Works

No abstract provided.


#Thisisirishfood - The Flavour Of Ireland's West Coast, Anke Klitzing Feb 2019

#Thisisirishfood - The Flavour Of Ireland's West Coast, Anke Klitzing

Articles

In the West of Ireland, a new awareness for quality ingredients and indigenous flavours are drawing out the potential of local produce and craftsmanship.


Housing Along The Brooklyn Waterfront: A Story Of Shipping, Industry, And Immigrants, Kurt C. Schlichting Jan 2019

Housing Along The Brooklyn Waterfront: A Story Of Shipping, Industry, And Immigrants, Kurt C. Schlichting

Publications and Research

No abstract provided.


Fighting For Their Lives: Why The Marginalized Irish From The 1840s-1910 Dominated American Prizefighting, Owen Marshall Dec 2018

Fighting For Their Lives: Why The Marginalized Irish From The 1840s-1910 Dominated American Prizefighting, Owen Marshall

Honors Program Theses and Projects

One of the most recognizable figures in the world during his lifetime, heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali, previously Cassius Clay and Cassius X, put his self-esteem on display with the simple declaration “I am the greatest.” This was a phrase he told himself long before he truly was the greatest, but he proved it to the world in 1964 when he defeated defending champion Sonny Liston. Upon knocking out his dangerous, violent, and cheating opponent, Ali whipped himself into a frenzy, as onlookers saw him fall over the ropes, scream at the ringside reporters who had previously doubted him, and ...


When Art Becomes Political: An Analysis Of Irish Republican Murals 1981 To 2011, Maura Wester Dec 2018

When Art Becomes Political: An Analysis Of Irish Republican Murals 1981 To 2011, Maura Wester

History & Classics Undergraduate Theses

For nearly thirty years in the late twentieth century, sectarian violence between Irish Catholics and Ulster Protestants plagued Northern Ireland. Referred to as “the Troubles,” the violence officially lasted from 1969, when British troops were deployed to the region, until 1998, when the peace agreement, the Good Friday Agreement, was signed. Despite the changes in the government system, two things have not changed in Northern Ireland since the Good Friday Agreement: the pride both Loyalists and Republicans have in their cultures and their means to express this: murals. Traditionally a Loyalist practice dating back to late 1920s, Republican murals did ...


Irish Journalists And Journalism During The American Civil War, Michael Foley Apr 2018

Irish Journalists And Journalism During The American Civil War, Michael Foley

Conference Papers

Irish journalists played a significant role in the lead up to the US Civil War in ensuring the Irish population supported the Union and volunteered for the army.


A Transformative Tragedy, Cassandra Karn Jan 2018

A Transformative Tragedy, Cassandra Karn

Audre Lorde Writing Prize

This short essay examines the Irish potato famine's impact on the lives of Irish women, both those who stayed in Ireland and those who immigrated to the United States.


Tracing Their Journey: A New Beginning For Irish Immigrants In 1850 Cleveland, Kathleen M. Edwards Jan 2018

Tracing Their Journey: A New Beginning For Irish Immigrants In 1850 Cleveland, Kathleen M. Edwards

Masters Theses

No abstract provided.


Orality In Joyce: Food, Famine, Feasts And Public Houses, Máirtín Mac Con Iomaire Jan 2018

Orality In Joyce: Food, Famine, Feasts And Public Houses, Máirtín Mac Con Iomaire

Books/Book Chapters

Some common themes within the history of food and literature include starvation, famine, gluttony, feasting, commensality, hospitality, religion, gender, and class, and indeed food also functions as a complex signifier of national, racial, and cultural identity. Despite the growing international scholarship of food in literature (Bevan 1988; Schofield 1989; Ellmann 1993; Applebaum 2006; Piatti-Farnell 2011; Gilbert and Porter 2015; Boyce and Fitzpatrick 2017; Piatti-Farnell and Lee Brien 2018), until recently, Ireland appeared “as only the smallest of dots on the map of high gastronomy” (Goldstein 2014, xi). Most international collections discuss the canonical Irish writings of James Joyce and of ...


Wagon Tracks. Volume 24, Issue 3 (May, 2010), Santa Fe Trail Association Aug 2017

Wagon Tracks. Volume 24, Issue 3 (May, 2010), Santa Fe Trail Association

Wagon Tracks

No abstract provided.


Unpolished Emeralds In The Gem State: Hard-Rock Mining, Labor Unions, And Irish Nationalism In The Mountain West And Idaho, 1850-1900, Victor D. Higgins Aug 2017

Unpolished Emeralds In The Gem State: Hard-Rock Mining, Labor Unions, And Irish Nationalism In The Mountain West And Idaho, 1850-1900, Victor D. Higgins

Boise State University Theses and Dissertations

Irish immigration to the United States, extant since the 1600s, exponentially increased during the Irish Great Famine of 1845-52. For many Catholic Irish, the legacy of colonization and the Famine intensified an existing narrative of forced exile and dispossession. It also endowed them with a predisposition to identify similarities between colonial exploitation and capitalism. These factors fed a growing Irish nationalism on both sides of the Atlantic, protean in the 1700s, which reified in the 1800s, around Anglophobia. In the Mountain West where mining spearheaded exploration and settlement, the Irish made up the largest ethnic group in hard-rock mines in ...


The Fabric Of Manhattan: Art And Industry In The Era Of A.T. Stewart, Patricia Wadsley Feb 2017

The Fabric Of Manhattan: Art And Industry In The Era Of A.T. Stewart, Patricia Wadsley

Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Soft spoken, short of stature, his sleepy blue eyes gazing wistfully upon the world around him, the Irish émigré A. T. Stewart hardly looked like a titan of business. But by 1863, he’d built two architecturally significant department stores, he was one of the leading importers, manufacturers, retailers and wholesalers in this country, and he had begun to collect significant works of art, which today have pride of place in art museums around the world.

Like many wealthy nineteenth century New Yorkers, Stewart amassed his wealth through commerce. However, Stewart was not just a merchant. As a leader in ...


Belfast Maine: Irish Identity And Acceptance In A Small City On Penobscot Bay, Kay Retzlaff Jan 2017

Belfast Maine: Irish Identity And Acceptance In A Small City On Penobscot Bay, Kay Retzlaff

Maine History

Retzlaff’s article examines how stereotypes were applied to Irish newcomers in early Belfast, Maine, even by “old-timers,” who also descended from Irish immigrants. Neither shared ancestry nor shared religion removed the stigma of these stereotypes, which complicated Irish identity in Belfast during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries as Protestant and Catholic newcomers alike sought to benefit from their ties to the Irish community while separating themselves from their Irish tropes. Kay Retzlaff is a professor of English at the University of Maine at Augusta. She earned her PhD from the University of Maine. Her MA and BA are from ...