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2006

Innovation

University of Wollongong

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Innovation Lock-In: Unlocking Research And Development Path Dependency In The Australian Wine Industry, D. K. Aylward Dec 2006

Innovation Lock-In: Unlocking Research And Development Path Dependency In The Australian Wine Industry, D. K. Aylward

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

Innovation within the Australian wine industry is at a crossroads. More specifically, under the influence of fundamental paradigm shifts, the objectives, extension and uptake of R&D within the industry’s current innovation framework are being subjected to rather schizophrenic forces. At one level, industry organizations are directing the R&D agenda from within a national, ‘Brand Australia’ context. At another level, the firms that are being serviced by these organizations are demanding region-specific R&D extension in response to global pressure for differentiation and products at higher price-points. This paper will explore these contradictory forces and the degree to ...


Emerging Interorganizational Structures In The Australian Wine Industry: Implications For Smes, D. K. Aylward, Michael Zanko Jul 2006

Emerging Interorganizational Structures In The Australian Wine Industry: Implications For Smes, D. K. Aylward, Michael Zanko

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

This paper discusses the globalization of the wine industry in terms of such issues as global production, distribution, technology transfer and branding. It also examines the increasing focus on localization and cluster development in light of the industry’s current rationalization. The paper argues that with such reconfiguration, ‘New’ and ‘Old World’ distinctions are blurring and may disappear. Furthermore, as the wine landscape evolves, regional cluster-based interorganizational domains are forming, along with the emergence of regional branding and the decline of a homogeneous Australian level industry. It is contended that these domains are essential in securing an ongoing role for ...


Sme Innovation Within The Australian Wine Industry: A Cluster Analysis, David Aylward, John Glynn Jan 2006

Sme Innovation Within The Australian Wine Industry: A Cluster Analysis, David Aylward, John Glynn

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

This paper assesses core innovation activity among SMEs within different levels of cluster development. The aim of the paper, using empirical data from the Australian wine industry, is to demonstrate that innovation levels and activity intensify as an industry cluster develops. By dividing wine clusters into ‘innovative’ (highly developed) and ‘organised’ (less developed) models, the paper uses selected core indicators of innovation activity to explore levels of integration within each model. This integration is examined in the context of Porter’s theory of ‘competitive advantage’, with implications for SMEs in particular, and lessons for industry clusters in general.


The Road To Innovation: Experiences In The Australian Wine Industry, D. K. Aylward Jan 2006

The Road To Innovation: Experiences In The Australian Wine Industry, D. K. Aylward

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

No abstract provided.


The Play Of Power And Politics In Innovation And Hrm, Michael Zanko, Richard Badham, Paul Couchman, Maren Schubert Jan 2006

The Play Of Power And Politics In Innovation And Hrm, Michael Zanko, Richard Badham, Paul Couchman, Maren Schubert

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

This paper analyses the human resource management (HRM) practices involved in the implementation of a process innovation approach to product development (concurrent engineering (CE)) in the Australian subsidiary of a multinational firm engaged in military defence electronics. According to the research literature, almost all aspects of managing product development under a CE approach are linked to people management. Yet in this particular case, other than project team structure, the prescriptive HRM dimensions of CE were conspicuously absent in the implementation process. This absence is explained by the play of power and politics involving stakeholders analysed over an 18 month period ...