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Do Proctored Exams Matter In Online Classes?, Oskar R. Harmon, James Lambrinos Mar 2006

Do Proctored Exams Matter In Online Classes?, Oskar R. Harmon, James Lambrinos

Economics Working Papers

Does the format of assessment (proctored or un-proctored exams) affect test scores in online principles of economics classes? This study uses data from two courses of principles of economics taught by the same instructor to gain some insight into this issue. When final exam scores are regressed against human capital factors, the R-squared statistic is 61.6% for the proctored format exams while it is only 12.2% for the un-proctored format. Three other exams in the class that had the proctored final were also un-proctored and also produced lower R-squared values, averaging 30.5%. These two findings suggest that ...


Improving Mental Health Assessments For Looked After Children, Michael Murray Jan 2006

Improving Mental Health Assessments For Looked After Children, Michael Murray

Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies

As part of the UK's National Health Service modernisation agenda, the Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety, Northern Ireland set up a Service Improvement Unit (SIU). The aim of the SIU was to identify key areas in the Health and Social Services that needed improvement and to provide a structured framework in which to achieve the necessary developments. A key area identified was the interface between children in care and the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services. It was believed that a lot of work needed to be undertaken to identify those children and young people in ...


Organisational Factors And Australian Ict Professionals' Views Of Wireless Network Vulnerability Assessments, Keir Dyce, Mary Barrett Jan 2006

Organisational Factors And Australian Ict Professionals' Views Of Wireless Network Vulnerability Assessments, Keir Dyce, Mary Barrett

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

No abstract provided.


Taking Care Of (E)-Business? Australian It Professionals' Views Of Wireless Network Vulnerability Assessments, Keir Dyce, Mary Barrett Jan 2006

Taking Care Of (E)-Business? Australian It Professionals' Views Of Wireless Network Vulnerability Assessments, Keir Dyce, Mary Barrett

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

M-commerce, a growing sub-category of E-business, allows business to be done 'anywhere, anytime'. However security of wireless devices remains problematic. It is unclear whether protocols to alleviate security problems, such as wireless vulnerability assessments (WNVAs), are being used or are effective. The paper reports on a survey-based study of Australian computer security professionals' use of and opinions about two types of WNVA: wireless monitoring and penetration testing. An initially surprising finding was how little both types are used, despite the ease with which wireless networks can be attacked and the fact that penetration testing is fairly well understood. In the ...


Organisational Factors And It Professionals' View Of Wireless Network Vulnerability Assessments, Keir Dyce, Mary Barrett Jan 2006

Organisational Factors And It Professionals' View Of Wireless Network Vulnerability Assessments, Keir Dyce, Mary Barrett

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

The paper reports on a survey-based study of Australian computer security professionals' use of and opinions about two types of wireless vulnerability assessment (WNV A): wireless monitoring and penetration testing. An initially surprising finding was how little both types are used, despite the ease with which wireless networks can be attacked, and the lack of clear obstacles to using them.

In the light of aspects of organisational culture, including decision-making style and professional identity, the survey findings become more explicable. Senior management, and even IT staff themselves, may still hold a traditional, 'wired network' view of their organisation. 'Culture' may ...