Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Digital Commons Network

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

PDF

Iowa State University

Plant Sciences

2008

Keyword
Publication
Publication Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 523

Full-Text Articles in Entire DC Network

Average Value Of Iowa Farmland Nears $4,500 An Acre In 2008 Survey, Michael Duffy Dec 2008

Average Value Of Iowa Farmland Nears $4,500 An Acre In 2008 Survey, Michael Duffy

Integrated Crop Management News

The average value of an acre of farmland in Iowa reached $4,468 in 2008, continuing to increase for the ninth year in a row, according to an annual survey conducted by Iowa State University Extension. Mike Duffy, ISU Extension farm economist who conducts the survey, said the indicators toward the end of the year imply the upward trend may be slowing as the national economy battles recessionary pressures.


Using Gis Technology For Iowa Pesticide Distribution And Transport Modeling, Joost Korpel, Cam Conrad, Kristine Schaefer, Rich Pope Dec 2008

Using Gis Technology For Iowa Pesticide Distribution And Transport Modeling, Joost Korpel, Cam Conrad, Kristine Schaefer, Rich Pope

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

The patterns of pesticide occurrence in surface and ground waters are linked to agricultural practices and the product's susceptibility to leaching and runoff. Pesticide use information has historically been catalogued in relation to points of sale from agrichemical dealerships. In an effort to provide a wide audience with an understanding of these occurrences and patterns, an atlas was developed during 2006 that provided a web-based front end to the data. The atlas links pesticide calculations of pounds of active ingredients sold with geographic information and water monitoring data using Geographic Information System (GIS) software.


Resources Needed For Record-Breaking Soybean Yields, Larry C. Purcell Dec 2008

Resources Needed For Record-Breaking Soybean Yields, Larry C. Purcell

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

In 2006, the soybean industry was astounded when Kip Cullers, a farmer in southwest Missouri reported yields of 139 bushels per acre in the Missouri Soybean Association yield contest. These amazing yields were shattered in 2007 when Mr. Cullers reported yields of 155 bushels per acre. Previous to Mr. Cullers' reports, the record yield was 118 bushels per acre set in small-plot research by Dr. Roy Flannery in 1983 at Rutger's University in New jersey.


Is There A Need For Stewardship Or Is Killing Weeds Good Enough?, Michael D.K. Owen Dec 2008

Is There A Need For Stewardship Or Is Killing Weeds Good Enough?, Michael D.K. Owen

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Since the introduction of glyphosate resistant (GR) soybean cultivars in 1996, GR crop have become the most rapidly and globally accepted agronomic practice in the history of agriculture (Anonymous 2007; Service 2007). In the United States (US), more than one billion cumulative acres of genetically engineered (GE) crops have been planted with most of these represented by GR crops (Gianessi 2005; Anonymous 2007; Service 2007; Gianessi 2008). Monsanto reported that their 2006 market share of glyphosate resistant crops (GRC) included 71.6 million acres of the soybean area, 34 million acres of corn, 11 .3 million acres of cotton, and ...


Update In Weed Management 2009 - Has The Silver Bullet Been Developed?, Micheal D. K. Owen Dec 2008

Update In Weed Management 2009 - Has The Silver Bullet Been Developed?, Micheal D. K. Owen

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

The short answer to the question posed in the title of this paper is an unqualified and emphatic no! While there are new technologies, herbicides and formulations available, they represent only additional tools that will be helpful in implementing a successful weed management program. An emphasis must be placed on the "helpful" and "management", neither of which meets grower desires for simple, convenient, and cheap weed control tactics. While the glyphosate based systems are generally successful (still) in killing weeds (see "Is there a reason to consider stewardship or is killing weeds good enough?" which appears in this proceedings), there ...


Soils 101: How To Apply The Information In The Clay County Soil Survey For Northeast Iowa Farmers And Ag-Professionals, Paul Kassel Dec 2008

Soils 101: How To Apply The Information In The Clay County Soil Survey For Northeast Iowa Farmers And Ag-Professionals, Paul Kassel

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

The Soil Survey of Clay County, Iowa is a publication of the National Cooperative Soil Survey. Major field work was completed in 1999. Soil names and descriptions were approved in 2002. The survey was made cooperatively by the Natural Resources Conservation Service; the Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station and the Cooperative Extension Service, Iowa State University; the division of Soil Conservation, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship; and the Clay County Conference Board.


Manure: The New Commodity, Angela Rieck-Hinz, Kelvin Leibold Dec 2008

Manure: The New Commodity, Angela Rieck-Hinz, Kelvin Leibold

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Rising commercial fertilizer prices have caused manure nutrients to become a valuable and much sought-after commodity Crop producers that have not traditionally used manure as a nutrient source for crop production are now looking to use manure to replace all or some of their commercial fertilizer inputs. Livestock producers are also looking for a way to capitalize on increasing feed input costs by selling manure.


Theory And Practice Of Integrated Pest Management In The 21st Century, Richard Pope, Marlin E. Rice Dec 2008

Theory And Practice Of Integrated Pest Management In The 21st Century, Richard Pope, Marlin E. Rice

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Webster defines a pest as any plant or animal that is detrimental to humans or human concerns (especially in agriculture or livestock production). Pest control has been a serious issue for humans since the dawn of civilization. Through the centuries, mechanical, biological, cultural and chemical controls of pests have evolved. The reasoned use of pesticides dates to at least 2500 BC, when sulfur was used as a control of mites and insects. As technology advanced, control measures were adjusted and new techniques and materials were discovered, and those changes greatly accelerated in the previous century.


Iowa Climate: A Century Of Change, Elwynn Taylor Dec 2008

Iowa Climate: A Century Of Change, Elwynn Taylor

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

The first 9 years of the "2000s" have delivered dry streams that had not been dry in 100 years and floods that set new record high crests. The average number of stormy days consistently climbed. Corn yields climbed and the annual deviation from the trend yield diminished, yet history says "this is the 3rd time yields have been consistent over a run of a decade or more." The climate has always changed and always will change. Historically, the roots of the National Weather Service began with the initial mission of "keeping a diary of the weather," and establishing "any material ...


A Fresh Look At Some New And Alternative Forages, Stephen K. Barnhart Dec 2008

A Fresh Look At Some New And Alternative Forages, Stephen K. Barnhart

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Iowa producers grow and manage 40 to 50 different species of plants for forage, cover crops in row crop fields and as components of soil erosion control and buffer strip practices. The most commonly used are:


Fertilizer Costs And Crop Production In 2009, David Asbridge Dec 2008

Fertilizer Costs And Crop Production In 2009, David Asbridge

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

No abstract provided.


Glyphosate-Resistant Waterhemp: Lessons Learned From The Devastation Resistant Palmer Amaranth Has Had On Southern Agriculture, Jason K. Norsworthy Dec 2008

Glyphosate-Resistant Waterhemp: Lessons Learned From The Devastation Resistant Palmer Amaranth Has Had On Southern Agriculture, Jason K. Norsworthy

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Palmer amaranth has become increasingly prevalent in crop fields in the southern U.S. over the past 8 to 10 years. Glyphosate resistance in Palmer amaranth was first confirmed in Georgia in 2004. Now, glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth is widespread in Georgia, Arkansas, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Mississippi. The resistant biotype is causing substantial yield loss, reduction in harvest efficiency, and complete abandonment of some fields. The focus of this presentation will be on glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth, a close relative of waterhemp, including:


Predicting Yield Before Harvest: How Does The Usda Forecast Corn And Soybean Yield?, Greg Thessen Dec 2008

Predicting Yield Before Harvest: How Does The Usda Forecast Corn And Soybean Yield?, Greg Thessen

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Crop production forecasts have two components--acres to be harvested and expected yield per acre. For example, preliminary corn and soybean acreage estimates are made using data obtained from a survey of farmers conducted during the first 2 weeks in June. Expected corn and soybean yields are obtained monthly, August through November, from two different types of yield surveys. Data from the yield surveys reflect conditions as of the first of the month, as data are collected during the last week of the previous month and the first 2 or 3 days of the current month.


Grain Storage, Storage Cost, And Training Module, Howard E. Shepherd Dec 2008

Grain Storage, Storage Cost, And Training Module, Howard E. Shepherd

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

With the expansion of the ethanol industry in Iowa in 2005 the Iowa Grain Quality Initiative saw the need to evaluate quality management practices and grain storage practices impacting grain movement to the ethanol industry. This presentation describes the response of the Iowa Grain Quality Initiative to the rapid expansion of Iowa's ethanol industry As more corn is used locally in ethanol fuel production, less is available for export, feed applications and other processing. This has led to changes in grain transport, on-farm grain storage and the function of local grain elevators.


Corn Plant Populations: A Critical Component In The Yield Equation, Lori J. Abendroth, Roger W. Elmore Dec 2008

Corn Plant Populations: A Critical Component In The Yield Equation, Lori J. Abendroth, Roger W. Elmore

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Hybrid development and yield advancements have primarily been associated with increasing stress tolerance, i.e. modern hybrids yield more under a resource-limited environment relative to older hybrids. Yield potential per acre has increased dramatically in the past fifty years, while the potential yield per plant has changed little, if any. Hybrids tolerate their neighbors better today and are therefore able to withstand higher plant densities while still producing an ear. Older hybrids have significant lodging and/or barrenness when planted at today's seeding rates. A significant portion of the observed yield increase over the last several decades is directly ...


Organic Agriculture In Iowa: Economics In The Era Of Ethanol, Kathleen Delate, Craig Chase Dec 2008

Organic Agriculture In Iowa: Economics In The Era Of Ethanol, Kathleen Delate, Craig Chase

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Organic agriculture continues to remain a viable alternative for Iowa farmers. Consumer demand has propelled the organic industry to a $20 billion enterprise in 2007 (Organic Trade Assn., 2008). Organic acreage in Iowa has increased from 21,733 acres in 1996 to over 100,000 acres in 2007, taking Iowa to a Number 4 position in the number of organic farmers in the U.S. (USDA-ERS, 2005). Current prices for organic corn, soybean and wheat on November 5, 2008, were listed as $10/bushel, $23/bushel, and $9.46/bushel, respectively (USDA-AMS, 2008a). Certified organic production requires a farm plan ...


Practical Considerations In Developing Bioenergy Crops, Emily A. Heaton, Kenneth J. Moore, Steven L. Fales Dec 2008

Practical Considerations In Developing Bioenergy Crops, Emily A. Heaton, Kenneth J. Moore, Steven L. Fales

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Biofuels represent a significant challenge and opportunity for agriculture. Producing liquid fuels from cellulosic biomass affords a number of potential environmental benefits. Biofuels result in lower greenhouse gas emissions than fuels derived from petroleum. Growing perennial biomass crops reduces soil erosion and sequesters more carbon than annual crops grown for grain or biomass. Corn and sorghum are crops that have high near-term potential as annual biomass crops. Dedicated biomass crops with very high yields will produce more fuel per acre, helping to balance land for food and fuel. Switchgrass and Miscanthus are perennial species that have been broadly evaluated as ...


Fertilizing Crops In The New Price Age - Phophorus And Potassium, Antonio P. Mallarino Dec 2008

Fertilizing Crops In The New Price Age - Phophorus And Potassium, Antonio P. Mallarino

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Profitable crop production requires appropriate soil phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) levels, so careful fertilization planning is required. Grain and fertilizer prices have increased significantly during the last two years. Increasing prices may not be a major issue as long as the historical ratio between crop and fertilizer prices is approximately maintained. Recently, however, fertilizer prices have been increasing steadily while grain prices have fluctuated significantly If there is a crop yield response to fertilization, high crop prices certainly help pay for more expensive fertilizer and may result in even greater net return to fertilization than when crop prices are ...


No-Tillage Soybean Production In Iowa, Palle Pedersen Dec 2008

No-Tillage Soybean Production In Iowa, Palle Pedersen

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

During the 2005 growing season 63 million acres in the United States were planted using no-tillage production practices. Total soybean acres in Iowa in 2007 were 9.4 million and it is estimated that only about 30% of those acres were planted using no-tillage practices.


Fertilizing Crops In The New Price Age - Nitrogen, John E. Sawyer Dec 2008

Fertilizing Crops In The New Price Age - Nitrogen, John E. Sawyer

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Fertilizers have been at unbelievably high prices, with tight supplies for some fertilizers. Total crop production costs are causing credit supply issues, which complicates decisions to allocate available funds for production expenses. Crop prices are changing rapidly, as are fertilizer prices. High corn and soybean prices certain help pay for expensive fertilizer and provide even greater net return to fertilization. However, the recent reduction in crop prices makes payoff of fertilizer and other production costs more problematic, and uncertain prices makes planning for next year difficult. On top of these monetary issues, mother nature has given us wet conditions in ...


For Crops … Its Rotation, Rotation, Rotation! The Sustainability Of The Corn-Soybean Rotation, Joe Lauer Dec 2008

For Crops … Its Rotation, Rotation, Rotation! The Sustainability Of The Corn-Soybean Rotation, Joe Lauer

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Sustainable agriculture is a practice that over the long term enhances environmental quality and the resource base on which agriculture depends, provides for basic human food and fiber needs, is economically viable, and improves the quality of life for farmers and society (White et al. , 1994). Crop rotation is a universal management practice that has been recognized and exploited for centuries and is a proven process that increases crop yields. Many reports involving tillage type, N fertilizer rate, and inclusion of a legume show yield benefit of 4 to 22% for rotated corn over continuous corn (Raimbault and Vyn, 1991 ...


Use Of Fungicides To Control Soybean Foliar Diseases In Iowa: A 6-Year Summary, X. B. Yang, S. S. Navi, Ken Pecinovsky, John Shriver Dec 2008

Use Of Fungicides To Control Soybean Foliar Diseases In Iowa: A 6-Year Summary, X. B. Yang, S. S. Navi, Ken Pecinovsky, John Shriver

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Prior to 2004, foliar diseases were not a concern in soybean production in Iowa and much of the north central region, except for seed production. Since the report of Asian soybean rust, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizhi, in South America in 2001 and then in the United States in 2004, fungicide applications became of interest to some producers. Interest has increased recently as soybean prices increased. The use of fungicides to control soybean foliar diseases has been a hot topic. Surveys of the literature show a disagreement among researchers, university extension recommendations and industry applications.


Management Of Phytophthora Root And Stem Rot Of Soybeans, Anne E. Dorrance Dec 2008

Management Of Phytophthora Root And Stem Rot Of Soybeans, Anne E. Dorrance

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Historically, Phytophthora root and stem rot is a disease that can cause total losses in yield if the wrong variety is planted in a field with high inoculum and saturated soil conditions develop. There have been sporadic epidemics over the past sixty years, with the highest losses recorded in the late 1960's and 1970's. In the past ten years there have been more reports of extensive replanting early in the growing season and higher levels of Phytophthora stem rot later in the growing season. This piece will describe how to recognize this historically important disease but also describe ...


Comparison Of Spring Applied Esn And Urea As Sources Of Nitrogen For Corn Production, J. A. Moore, R. Killorn, M. Gonzalez Dec 2008

Comparison Of Spring Applied Esn And Urea As Sources Of Nitrogen For Corn Production, J. A. Moore, R. Killorn, M. Gonzalez

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

The use of nitrogen (N) fertilizer to obtain profitable corn grain yields is very common in Iowa. Proper N fertilization is a difficult challenge facing today's crop producers. Rising costs of N fertilizer encourage producers to look for ways to increase yields and recover applied N while keeping costs at a minimum.


Review Of 2008 Growing Season From A Pathologist's Perspective, Alison Robertson, Daren Mueller Dec 2008

Review Of 2008 Growing Season From A Pathologist's Perspective, Alison Robertson, Daren Mueller

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Environment plays an important role in disease development, not only in the infection by and growth of the pathogen, but also for the growth and development of the host plant (i.e., corn and soybean crop). As we look back over the past growing season at the weather and diseases that were prevalent, there were few surprise epidemics.


Managing Nitrogen For Optimum Profit And Minimum Environmental Loss, Gyles Randall Dec 2008

Managing Nitrogen For Optimum Profit And Minimum Environmental Loss, Gyles Randall

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

With volatile crop and nitrogen prices, greater environmental concerns and awareness, and increasing efforts to minimize risk, farmers are searching for information to establish an effective and profitable N management game plan. However, the N management game plan is not simple. It becomes complex as various uncontrollable soil and weather factors are involved as well as the controllable factors of N rate, time and method of application, N source, nitrification inhibitors, etc. Best management practices (BMPs) for N are broadly defined as economically sound, voluntary practices that are capable of optimizing profitability, minimizing the loss of nitrate to surface and ...


Increasing The Odds Of A Profitable Yield Response To Foliar Fungicide Application On Corn, Alison Robertson, John Shriver, Ken Pecinovsky Dec 2008

Increasing The Odds Of A Profitable Yield Response To Foliar Fungicide Application On Corn, Alison Robertson, John Shriver, Ken Pecinovsky

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

During the 2007 growing season, approximately 3 million acres of corn were sprayed with a foliar fungicide. Yield responses due to a fungicide application varied widely. Data compiled from university trials in 12 Corn Belt states and Ontario, Canada in 2007 showed an average yield response of 3 bu/acre to applications of corn fungicides (Bradley, 2008). Among the industries from on-farm trials, BASF reported an average yield increase of 12 to 16 bu/acre, Bayer CropScience an average yield increase of about 10 bu/acre and Syngenta an average yield increase of 15 to 20 bu/acre (Farm Industry ...


Tillage And Crop Rotation Management Impact On Yield And Soil Quality, Mahdi Al-Kaisi Dec 2008

Tillage And Crop Rotation Management Impact On Yield And Soil Quality, Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference

Tillage decision is only one concern farmers have to make every fall. There are many other factors need to be considered in selecting a tillage system for any given field or region within the state. Those factors are soil conditions, which can include, soil slope, soil drainage, topsoil depth or the A-horizon depth. Other factors need to be considered, which are equally important such as hybrid selection, crop rotation, and management factors, such as, residue cover, type of residue (corn or soybean), soil moisture condition at the time of making the decision, timing of tillage operation, fertilizer management in conjunction ...


Soybean Cyst Nematode Confirmed In Ida County In 2008, Gregory L. Tylka Dec 2008

Soybean Cyst Nematode Confirmed In Ida County In 2008, Gregory L. Tylka

Integrated Crop Management News

The soybean cyst nematode has been known to exist in Iowa since 1978. The first Iowa finding was in Winnebago County. In the 1980s and 1990s, SCN was found for the first time in many different Iowa counties. By 2000, SCN had not yet been found in only nine Iowa counties. By the end of 2007, it had not yet been found or officially confirmed in only three Iowa counties – Allamakee, Ida, and Lyon County. Earlier in 2008, SCN was confirmed to be present in Lyon County.


Is All Well That Ends Well? Iowa Corn – 2008, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth Dec 2008

Is All Well That Ends Well? Iowa Corn – 2008, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth

Integrated Crop Management News

Shakespeare penned “All’s well that ends well” over 400 years ago. Scholars say the play itself cannot easily be classified either as a tragedy or a comedy. Can the same be said of the 2008 growing season? The Dec. 1, 2008 USDA-NASS report says with 6 percent of Iowa’s corn is yet to be harvested the 2008 crop finished well, with the third best yield expected in Iowa’s history – 172 bushels per acre based on USDA’s November estimate. And yet 2008 started out with low expectations. We’ll be talking about this season for years.