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Touring The Troubles In West Belfast: Building Peace Or Reproducing Conflict?, Wendy A. Wiedenhoft Murphy 2009 John Carroll University

Touring The Troubles In West Belfast: Building Peace Or Reproducing Conflict?, Wendy A. Wiedenhoft Murphy

Wendy A. Wiedenhoft Murphy

This article examines the development of tourism in West Belfast, Northern Ireland, and explores the extent to which tourism builds peace or reproduces processes of past conflict. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with tour managers and tour guides that include West Belfast in their itineraries and participant observations of tours conducted in West Belfast in the summer of 2007. The findings from this data suggest that while tourism there is reproducing some processes of past conflict, particularly territoriality, it has the potential to build cross-community relationships.


Aftershocks: The Impact Of Clinic Violence On Abortion Services, Mireille Jacobson, Heather Royer 2009 Rand Corporation

Aftershocks: The Impact Of Clinic Violence On Abortion Services, Mireille Jacobson, Heather Royer

Mireille Jacobson

No abstract provided.


Lechem Hara (Bad Bread), Lechem Tov (Good Bread): Survival And Sacrifice During The Holocaust, Carolyn S. Ellis 2009 University of South Florida

Lechem Hara (Bad Bread), Lechem Tov (Good Bread): Survival And Sacrifice During The Holocaust, Carolyn S. Ellis

Carolyn Ellis

In Judaism, human nature is understood as existing on a spectrum between yetzer hara (evil inclination) and yetzer tov (good inclination). Jews struggle to suppress the yetzer hara and exercise the yetzer tov. Based on an oral history interview and co-created by a survivor of the Holocaust and a researcher, this story focuses on bread (lechem) and hunger in a Polish ghetto. The narrative encourages reflection about good and evil and about the tangled intermingling of the generosity of self-sacrifice and the instinctive drive for survival.


Into The Mainstream? Labor Market Outcomes Of Mexican-Origin Workers, Renee R. Luthra, Roger D. Waldinger 2009 University of California, Los Angeles

Into The Mainstream? Labor Market Outcomes Of Mexican-Origin Workers, Renee R. Luthra, Roger D. Waldinger

Roger D Waldinger

We evaluate recent revisions of assimilation theory by comparing the labor market performance of Mexican immigrants and their descendents to those of native white and black Americans. Using the CPS Contingent Worker Series, we examine public and nonstandard employment and fringe benefits in addition to earnings. We find little evidence that Mexican Americans cluster in nonstandard work, noting instead intergenerational improvement in benefits and pay. However, all Mexican origin workers are disadvantaged relative to native whites in terms of benefits. It is only within the public sector that the labor market outcomes of Mexican origin workers converge with native whites.


Gender And American Politics, Richard M. Skinner 2009 Rollins College

Gender And American Politics, Richard M. Skinner

Richard M. Skinner

Teaching presentation


Syllabus For Political Parties, Richard M. Skinner 2009 Rollins College

Syllabus For Political Parties, Richard M. Skinner

Richard M. Skinner

No abstract provided.


Globalization Opinion Piece, Howard H. Lentner 2009 Selected Works

Globalization Opinion Piece, Howard H. Lentner

Howard H. Lentner

Government regulation is essential to stable globalization.


How Longer Work Lives Ease The Crunch Of Population Aging, Nicole Maestas, Julie M. Zissimopoulos 2009 Rand Corporation

How Longer Work Lives Ease The Crunch Of Population Aging, Nicole Maestas, Julie M. Zissimopoulos

Nicole Maestas

[Formerly Work at Older Ages: The Shape of Change]

Population aging is not a looming crisis of the future -- it is already here. Economic challenges arise when the increase in people surviving to old age and the decline in the number of young people alive to support them cause the growth in society's consumption needs to outpace growth in its productive capacity. The ultimate impact of population aging on our standard of living in the future depends a great deal on how long people choose to work before they retire from the labor force. Here, there is reason for ...


Children Living In Rural Areas: Urban/Rural Disparities At The Secondary Level In Turkey, Daniel Tapia 2009 GC Genera

Children Living In Rural Areas: Urban/Rural Disparities At The Secondary Level In Turkey, Daniel Tapia

Daniel Tapia

No abstract provided.


The Central American Caribbean: Rethinking Regional And National Imaginaries, George Yudice 2009 University of Miami

The Central American Caribbean: Rethinking Regional And National Imaginaries, George Yudice

George Yúdice

No abstract provided.


Building Sustainable Societies: A Swedish Case Study On The Limits Of Reflexive Modernization., Cindy Isenhour 2009 University of Maine, Department of Anthropology

Building Sustainable Societies: A Swedish Case Study On The Limits Of Reflexive Modernization., Cindy Isenhour

Cindy Isenhour

No abstract provided.


Symbolic Or Substantive Policy? Measuring The Extent Of Local Commitment To Climate Protection, Rachel M. Krause 2009 University of Texas at El Paso

Symbolic Or Substantive Policy? Measuring The Extent Of Local Commitment To Climate Protection, Rachel M. Krause

Rachel M. Krause

Over 1,000 U.S. municipalities have formally committed to reduce their local greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through participation in one of several climate protection networks. This has attracted the attention of researchers interested in theories of free-riding and local political decision making who question why municipalities become engaged in this global effort. However, whereas joining a climate protection network or adopting an emissions reduction goal are relatively low cost acts, the implementation of such policies entails higher costs. This raises legitimate questions about the extent and type of follow-through made on municipal climate protection commitments. This paper begins to ...


Let’S “Transform” The Colts The Way We Do Public Schools: Phase 2, Jeff Abbott 2009 Indiana University - Purdue University Fort Wayne

Let’S “Transform” The Colts The Way We Do Public Schools: Phase 2, Jeff Abbott

Jeff Abbott

This article uses tongue in cheek to compare the possible closing, turnaround, restart, or transformation of the Indianapolis Colts with what is happening in school reform.


Libqual Results - Spring 2010, Lesli A. Baker 2009 Utah Valley University

Libqual Results - Spring 2010, Lesli A. Baker

Lesli A Baker

No abstract provided.


The Economic Impact Of Shale Gas Extraction: A Review Of Existing Studies, Thomas C. Kinnaman 2009 Bucknell University

The Economic Impact Of Shale Gas Extraction: A Review Of Existing Studies, Thomas C. Kinnaman

Thomas C. Kinnaman

No abstract provided.


Home Country Farewell: The Withering Of Immigrants' "Transnational" Ties, Roger D. Waldinger 2009 University of California, Los Angeles

Home Country Farewell: The Withering Of Immigrants' "Transnational" Ties, Roger D. Waldinger

Roger D Waldinger

This paper seeks to explore the importance of home country versus sending country comparing immigrants who moved to the United States as adults with immigrant offspring born abroad, but raised in the United States, the “1.5 generation”. Makes use of the public use data sets from four, large-scale surveys, the paper finds that home country connectedness is limited and that most immigrants view the United States as home. However, the 1.5ers have put down deeper roots and have steadily cut back their involvements in and ties to the countries where they were born. While we still know too ...


Managing Medical Bills On The Brink Of Bankruptcy, Melissa B. Jacoby, Mirya Holman 2009 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Managing Medical Bills On The Brink Of Bankruptcy, Melissa B. Jacoby, Mirya Holman

Melissa B. Jacoby

This paper presents original empirical evidence on financial interactions between medical providers and their patients who go bankrupt. We use a nationally representative sample of people who filed for bankruptcy in 2007 to compare two popular but hotly contested methods of measuring medical burden. By applying both methods to the same filers, we find that nearly four out of five respondents had some financial obligation for medical care not covered by insurance in the two years prior to filing as measured by the survey method. The court record method paints a different picture, with only half of the cases containing ...


Revisiting Richard Mckeon’S Architectonic Rhetoric: A Response To ‘The Uses Of "Rhetoric In A Technological Age: Architectonic Productive Arts’, David J. Depew 2009 University of Iowa

Revisiting Richard Mckeon’S Architectonic Rhetoric: A Response To ‘The Uses Of "Rhetoric In A Technological Age: Architectonic Productive Arts’, David J. Depew

David J Depew

No abstract provided.


Everyday Conflict And Daily Stressors: Coping Responses Of Black Women, J. Camille Hall 2009 University of Tennessee - Knoxville

Everyday Conflict And Daily Stressors: Coping Responses Of Black Women, J. Camille Hall

J. Camille Hall, PhD., LCSW

The purpose of this study was to explore how Black women cope with the impact of daily stressors in their lives. To understand stress and coping among Black women, it was necessary to explore the interlocking effects of race, gender, and social class on these stressors and their effects on the women’s ability to cope with the consequences for their health and emotional and psychological well-being. An exploratory design with grounded theory methods was used to develop a midrange theory about stress and coping among Black women on the basis of the women’s experience with sociocultural factors, namely ...


Person-Organization Incongruence As A Predictor Of Right-Wing Authoritarianism, Social Dominance Orientation, And Heterosexism, Kristie L. Seelman, N. E. Walls 2009 Georgia State University

Person-Organization Incongruence As A Predictor Of Right-Wing Authoritarianism, Social Dominance Orientation, And Heterosexism, Kristie L. Seelman, N. E. Walls

Kristie L Seelman

Using a sample of 124 incoming social work graduate students, we examined whether levels of perceived incongruence with social work values and the perceived culture of a graduate social work program significantly correlate with social psychological constructs. The social psychological constructs are associated with maintenance and support for social stratification in general and with prejudicial attitudes based on sexual orientation more specifically. Results suggest that higher levels of cultural incongruence are associated with significantly higher levels of right-wing authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, hostile heterosexism, aversive heterosexism, and paternalistic heterosexism. Nonsignificant results emerged for amnestic heterosexism and positive stereotypic heterosexism. Implications ...


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