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Selection Of Pathways To Foraging Sites In Crop Fields By Flightless Canada Geese, Troy M. Radtke, Charles D. Dieter 2010 South Dakota State University

Selection Of Pathways To Foraging Sites In Crop Fields By Flightless Canada Geese, Troy M. Radtke, Charles D. Dieter

Human–Wildlife Interactions

Geese, especially when they are flightless, can cause significant crop damage. We determined the effects of shoreline characteristics on foraging site selection by flightless Canada geese (Branta canadensis) in South Dakota. Distance from edge of crop field to wetland and visual obstruction by vegetation were important determinants of pathway selection by geese. Geese used crop fields for foraging that were closer to water than unused fields. Geese accessed those fields along pathways with less visual obstruction by vegetation than unused pathways. Our data suggest that this distance of crops to wetlands is the most important shoreline characteristic determining where flightless ...


Bulldozers And Blueberries: Managing Fence Damage By Bare-Nosed Wombats At The Agricultural–Riparian Interface, Philip Borchard, Ian A. Wright 2010 University of Sydney

Bulldozers And Blueberries: Managing Fence Damage By Bare-Nosed Wombats At The Agricultural–Riparian Interface, Philip Borchard, Ian A. Wright

Human–Wildlife Interactions

Fence damage by bare-nosed wombats (Vombatus ursinus) can be a serious problem for farmers wishing to reduce herbivory by other herbivores on valuable crops. We investigated the effectiveness of exclusion fencing to prevent the incursion of unwanted native and feral herbivores and the use of swinging gates designed to allow wombats to pass through the fence without having to damage it. We also examined the temporal response of animals toward exclusion fencing and wombat gates. The 10-month study took place on the interface between natural riparian vegetation and a 22-ha blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) orchard in southeastern Australia. Following the testing ...


Estimating Annual Vertebrate Mortality On Roads At Saguaro National Park, Arizona, Kenneth Gerow, Natasha C. Kline, Don E. Swann, Marin Pokorny 2010 University of Wyoming

Estimating Annual Vertebrate Mortality On Roads At Saguaro National Park, Arizona, Kenneth Gerow, Natasha C. Kline, Don E. Swann, Marin Pokorny

Human–Wildlife Interactions

Road-killed vertebrates are a conspicuous effect of roads on animals, particularly in natural preserves where wildlife is protected. Knowledge of the number of vertebrates killed by vehicles in a national park or other natural area is important for managers, but these numbers are difficult to estimate because such mortality patterns vary greatly in space and time and by taxonomic group. Additionally, animals killed by vehicles may be difficult to observe, particularly during driving surveys, and carcasses may not persist between surveys due to scavenging and other factors. We modified an estimator previously developed for determining bird mortality at wind turbines ...


Improved Methods For Deterring Cliff Swallow Nesting On Highway Structures, Michael Delwiche, Robert W. Coates, W. Paul Gorenzel, Terrell P. Salmon 2010 University of California, Davis

Improved Methods For Deterring Cliff Swallow Nesting On Highway Structures, Michael Delwiche, Robert W. Coates, W. Paul Gorenzel, Terrell P. Salmon

Human–Wildlife Interactions

Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) are migratory birds that frequently nest on highway structures, such as bridges. Because cliff swallows are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, nesting control methods must not harm cliff swallows or disturb active nests. This can cause delays for maintenance divisions of state departments of transportation, resulting in additional cost. In a multiyear project, we evaluated the effects of bioacoustic deterrents and bridge surface modifications on nesting behavior of cliff swallows. We used cliff swallow alarm and distress calls as bioacoustic deterrents (hereafter, broadcast calls [BC]) because they previously had been shown to ...


Refinement Of Biomarker Pentosidine Methodology For Use On Aging Birds, Crissa K. Cooey, Jesse A. Fallon, Michael L. Avery, James T. Anderson, Elizabeth A. Falkenstein, Hillar Klandorf 2010 West Virginia University

Refinement Of Biomarker Pentosidine Methodology For Use On Aging Birds, Crissa K. Cooey, Jesse A. Fallon, Michael L. Avery, James T. Anderson, Elizabeth A. Falkenstein, Hillar Klandorf

Human–Wildlife Interactions

There is no reliable method for determining age for most species of long-lived birds. Recent success using the skin chemical pentosidine as a biomarker has shown promise as an aging tool for birds. Pentosidine levels have been determined only from the breast tissue of carcasses, and we sought to refine the procedure with respect to biopsy size and location for safe and effective use on living birds. We compared pentosidine concentrations in 4 skin-size samples (4, 6, 8, and 20-mm diameter biopsies) from the breast of black vulture (Coragyps atratus) carcasses. We also compared pentosidine levels from breast and patagial ...


Techniques Demers Draw Station System, Steve DeMers 2010 USDA/Wildlife Services

Techniques Demers Draw Station System, Steve Demers

Human–Wildlife Interactions

No abstract provided.


In Memory William B. Jackson, Michael W. Fall 2010 Utah State University

In Memory William B. Jackson, Michael W. Fall

Human–Wildlife Interactions

No abstract provided.


Virtual Environments And Sensory Integration: Effects Of Aging And Stroke, Nicoleta L. Bugnariu, Joyce Fung 2010 University of North Texas Health Science Center

Virtual Environments And Sensory Integration: Effects Of Aging And Stroke, Nicoleta L. Bugnariu, Joyce Fung

All Faculty Scholarship

Research was carried out on the effects of aging and sensory motor defi cits following strokes with respect to the capacity of the central nervous system to resolve sensory confl icts created by Virtual Reality (VR). The results of this research demonstrate that VR can be a valuable tool for therapeutic interventions that require an adaptation to complex, multimodal environments. The rehabilitation protocols include balancing training in virtual environments.

Les études qui ont été menées sur les effets du vieillissement et des défi cits sensori-moteurs consé-cutivement aux accidents vasculaires cérébraux concernent la capacité du système nerveux cen-tral à résoudre les ...


Interleukin 6 And 8 Gene Expression Responses To Resistance Exercise And The Correlation To Muscle Mass, Vivien Massie 2010 Edith Cowan University

Interleukin 6 And 8 Gene Expression Responses To Resistance Exercise And The Correlation To Muscle Mass, Vivien Massie

Theses : Honours

The post exercise inflammatory response is a key signalling mechanism regulating muscle protein synthesis. The purpose of this research was firstly to determine whether muscle mass in non-strength trained individuals was associated with the inflammatory muscle gene response after a single bout of eccentric muscle loading. Secondly, to determine whether changes in muscle cross-sectional area after a chronic increase in muscle loading (resistance training) is related to the inflammatory gene response to a single bout of muscle loading. Eleven male participants (21.6 ± 4.1 years) volunteered for this study. Each participant completed a preliminary testing session that consisted of ...


Gender Dimorphism In The Exercise-Naïve Murine Skeletal Muscle Proteome, Lauren Ann Metskas, Mohini Kulp, Stylianos P. Scordilis 2010 Smith College

Gender Dimorphism In The Exercise-Naïve Murine Skeletal Muscle Proteome, Lauren Ann Metskas, Mohini Kulp, Stylianos P. Scordilis

Biological Sciences: Faculty Publications

Skeletal muscle is a plastic tissue with known gender dimorphism, especially at the metabolic level. A proteomic comparison of male and female murine biceps brachii was undertaken, resolving an average of 600 protein spots of MW 15-150 kDa and pI 5-8. Twenty-six unique full-length proteins spanning 11 KOG groups demonstrated statistically significant (p<0.05) abundance differences between genders; the majority of these proteins have metabolic functions. Identified glycolytic enzymes demonstrated decreased abundance in females, while abundance differences in identified oxidative phosphorylation enzymes were specific to the proteins rather than to the functional group as a whole. Certain cytoskeletal and stress proteins showed specific expression differences, and all three phosphorylation states of creatine kinase showed significant decreased abundance in females. Expression differences were significant but many were subtle (≤ 2-fold), and known hormonally-regulated proteins were not identified. We conclude that while gender dimorphism is present in non-exercised murine skeletal muscle, the proteome comparison of male and female biceps brachii in exercise-naive mice indicates subtle differences rather than a large or obviously hormonal dimorphism.


Beliefs And Attitudes Toward Vegetarian Lifestyle Across Generations, Peter Pribis, Rose C. Pencak, Tevni Grajales 2010 Andrews University

Beliefs And Attitudes Toward Vegetarian Lifestyle Across Generations, Peter Pribis, Rose C. Pencak, Tevni Grajales

Faculty Publications

The objective of the study was to examine whether reasons to adopt vegetarian lifestyle differ significantly among generations. Using a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ), we identified that 4% of the participants were vegans, 25% lacto-ovo-vegetarians, 4% pesco-vegetarians and 67% non-vegetarian. Younger people significantly agreed more with the moral reason and with the environmental reason. People ages 41-60 significantly agreed more with the health reason. There are significant differences across generations as to why people choose to live a vegetarian lifestyle. © 2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


Genetic Diversity, Micro Propagation, And Cold Hardiness Of Ilex Glabra (L.) A. Gray, Youping Sun 2010 The University of Maine

Genetic Diversity, Micro Propagation, And Cold Hardiness Of Ilex Glabra (L.) A. Gray, Youping Sun

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Ilex glabra (L.) A.Gray (inkberry) is a native evergreen shrub with dark green foliage and compact habit. This shrub has gained popularity in the northern landscapes of the United States and more nursery growers would like to produce it. To better understand genetic relationships among inkberry cultivars and breed cold-hardy cultivars for northern nursery growers and landscape specialists, the following projects were conducted. A group of 48 inkberry accessions and two other Ilex species (Ilex crenata Thunb. and I. mutchagara Makino) were studied using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. A total of 229 markers between 50 and 500 ...


Ethylene Receptors Function As Components Of High-Molecular-Mass Protein Complexes In Arabidopsis, Brad Binder, Yi-Feng Chen, Zhiyong Gao, Robert Kerris, Wuyi Wang, G. Schaller 2009 University of Tennessee - Knoxville

Ethylene Receptors Function As Components Of High-Molecular-Mass Protein Complexes In Arabidopsis, Brad Binder, Yi-Feng Chen, Zhiyong Gao, Robert Kerris, Wuyi Wang, G. Schaller

Brad M. Binder

Background The gaseous plant hormone ethylene is perceived in Arabidopsis thaliana by a five-member receptor family composed of ETR1, ERS1, ETR2, ERS2, and EIN4. Methodology/Principal Findings Gel-filtration analysis of ethylene receptors solubilized from Arabidopsis membranes demonstrates that the receptors exist as components of high-molecular-mass protein complexes. The ERS1 protein complex exhibits an ethylene-induced change in size consistent with ligand-mediated nucleation of protein-protein interactions. Deletion analysis supports the participation of multiple domains from ETR1 in formation of the protein complex, and also demonstrates that targeting to and retention of ETR1 at the endoplasmic reticulum only requires the first 147 amino ...


Cell Adhesion Property Affected By Cyclooxygenase And Lipoxygenase: Opto-Electric Approach (With Chang Kyoung Choi, Mugdha Sukhthankar, Chul-Ho Kim, Seong-Ho Lee, Anthony English, Kenneth D. Kihm., Seung Baek 2009 The University of Tennessee

Cell Adhesion Property Affected By Cyclooxygenase And Lipoxygenase: Opto-Electric Approach (With Chang Kyoung Choi, Mugdha Sukhthankar, Chul-Ho Kim, Seong-Ho Lee, Anthony English, Kenneth D. Kihm., Seung Baek

Seung J Baek

Expression of cyclooxygenases (COX) and lipoxygenases (LOX) has been linked to many pathophysiological phenotypes, including cell adhesion. However, many current approaches to measure cellular changes are performed only in a fixed-time point. Since cells dynamically move in conjunction with the cell matrix, there is a pressing need for dynamic or time-dependent methods for the investigation of cell properties. In the presented study, we used stable human colorectal cancer cell lines ectopically expressing COX-1, COX-2, and 15LOX-1, to investigate whether expression of COX-1, COX-2, or 15LOX-1 would affect cell adhesion using our opto-electric methodology. In a fixed-time point experiment, only COX-1- ...


The Tick Saliva Protein, Salp15, Contributes To Th17-Induced Pathology During Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis, Juan Anguita, I.J. Juncadella, T.C. Bates, R. Suleiman, A. Monteagudo-Mera, C.M. Olson, N. Navasa, E.R. Olivera, C. Teuscher, B.A. Osborne 2009 University of Massachusetts - Amherst

The Tick Saliva Protein, Salp15, Contributes To Th17-Induced Pathology During Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis, Juan Anguita, I.J. Juncadella, T.C. Bates, R. Suleiman, A. Monteagudo-Mera, C.M. Olson, N. Navasa, E.R. Olivera, C. Teuscher, B.A. Osborne

Juan Anguita

No abstract provided.


Delineation Of Precursors In Murine Spleen That Develop In Contact With Splenic Endothelium To Give Novel Dendritic-Like Cells., Jonathan Tan, Pravin Periasamy, Helen O'Neill 2009 Australian National University

Delineation Of Precursors In Murine Spleen That Develop In Contact With Splenic Endothelium To Give Novel Dendritic-Like Cells., Jonathan Tan, Pravin Periasamy, Helen O'Neill

Helen O'Neill

Hematopoietic cell lineages are best described in terms of distinct progenitors with limited differentiative capacity. To distinguish cell lineages, it is necessary to define progenitors and induce their differentiation in vitro. We previously reported in vitro development of immature dendritic-like cells (DCs) in long-term cultures (LTCs) of murine spleen, and in cocultures of spleen or bone marrow (BM) over splenic endothelial cell lines derived from LTCs. Cells produced are phenotypically distinct CD11b(hi)CD11c(lo)CD8(-)MHC-II(-) cells, tentatively named L-DCs. Here we delineate L-DC progenitors as different from known DC progenitors in BM and DC precursors in spleen. The ...


A Rapid Direct Solvent Extraction Method For The Extraction Of 2-Dodecylcyclobutanone From Irradiated Ground Beef Patties Using Acetonitrile., Amit Kumar 2009 Kansas State University

A Rapid Direct Solvent Extraction Method For The Extraction Of 2-Dodecylcyclobutanone From Irradiated Ground Beef Patties Using Acetonitrile., Amit Kumar

Amit Kumar, DVM, MS, PhD

The amount of irradiated beef in the U.S. market is growing, and a reliable, rapid method is needed to detect irradiated beef and quantify the irradiation dose. The official analytical method (BS EN 1785 2003) that has been adopted by the European Union is time consuming. The objective of this study was to develop a rapid method for the analysis of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) in irradiated beef. A 5 g sample of commercially irradiated ground beef patty (90/10) was extracted with n-hexane using a Soxhlet apparatus or with acetonitrile via direct solvent extraction. The Soxhlet hexane extract was evaporated ...


Early Cranial Patterning In The Direct-Developing Frog Eleutherodactylus Coqui Revealed Through Gene Expression, Ryan Kerney, Joshua Gross, James Hanken 2009 Gettysburg College

Early Cranial Patterning In The Direct-Developing Frog Eleutherodactylus Coqui Revealed Through Gene Expression, Ryan Kerney, Joshua Gross, James Hanken

Ryan Kerney

Genetic and developmental alterations associated with the evolution of amphibian direct development remain largely unexplored. Specifically, little is known of the underlying expression of skeletal regulatory genes, which may reveal early modifications to cranial ontogeny in direct-developing species. We describe expression patterns of three key skeletal regulators (runx2, sox9, and bmp4) along with the cartilage-dominant collagen 2a1 gene (col2a1) during cranial development in the direct- developing anuran, Eleutherodactylus coqui. Expression patterns of these regulators reveal transient skeletogenic anlagen that correspond to larval cartilages, but which never fully form in E. coqui. Suprarostral anlagen in the frontonasal processes are detected through ...


Bioelectronics, J. Fleming, Steven Ripp 2009 University of Tennessee - Knoxville

Bioelectronics, J. Fleming, Steven Ripp

Steven Ripp

The Encyclopedia of Industrial Biotechnology was published in order to help readers make sense of the vast amounts of information that have been published around the world across a broad array of ournals, books, and websites. With its comprehensive coverage, Encyclopedia of Industrial Biotechnology is the ideal starting point for research projects involving any aspect of industrial biological processes, including fermentation, biocatalysis, bioseparation, and biofabrication


Fitness Variation Due To Sexual Antagonism And Linkage Disequilibrium, Manus Patten, David Haig, Fransisco Úbeda de Torres 2009 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Fitness Variation Due To Sexual Antagonism And Linkage Disequilibrium, Manus Patten, David Haig, Fransisco Úbeda De Torres

Francisco Úbeda de Torres

Extensive fitness variation for sexually antagonistic characters has been detected in nature. However, current population genetic theory suggests that sexual antagonism is unlikely to play a major role in the maintenance of variation. We present a twolocus model of sexual antagonism that is capable of explaining greater fitness variance at equilibrium than previous single-locus models. The second genetic locus provides additional fitness variance in two complementary ways. First, linked loci can maintain gene variants that are lost in single-locus models of evolution, expanding the opportunity for polymorphism. Second, linkage disequilibrium results between any two sexually antagonistic genes, producing an excess ...


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