Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Knowledge

Series

University of Wollongong

Physical Sciences and Mathematics

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

The Art Of Learning: Wildfire, Amenity Migration And Local Environmental Knowledge, Christine Eriksen, T Prior Jan 2011

The Art Of Learning: Wildfire, Amenity Migration And Local Environmental Knowledge, Christine Eriksen, T Prior

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Communicating the need to prepare well in advance of the wildfire season is a strategic priority for wildfire management agencies worldwide. However, there is considerable evidence to suggest that although these agencies invest significant effort towards this objective in the lead up to each wildfire season, landholders in at-risk locations often remain under-prepared. One reason for the poor translation of risk information materials into actual preparation may be attributed to the diversity of people now inhabiting wildfire-prone locations in peri-urban landscapes. These people hold widely varying experiences, beliefs, attitudes and values relating to wildfire, which influence their understanding and interpretation ...


Indigenous Environmental Knowledge, Christine Eriksen, Michael J. Adams Jan 2010

Indigenous Environmental Knowledge, Christine Eriksen, Michael J. Adams

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

No abstract provided.


Environmental (Re)Education And Local Environmental Knowledge: Statutory Ground-Based Monitoring And Pastoral Culture In Central Australia, Nicholas J. Gill Jan 2003

Environmental (Re)Education And Local Environmental Knowledge: Statutory Ground-Based Monitoring And Pastoral Culture In Central Australia, Nicholas J. Gill

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Ground-based monitoring of rangeland condition is common in Australian pastoral administration systems. In the Northern Territory, such monitoring is officially seen as a key plank of sustainable pastoral land use. In the NT and elsewhere, these monitoring schemes have sought to increase participation by pastoralists. Involvement of pastoralists in monitoring is theoretically an educative process that will cause pastoralists to more critically examine their management practices. Critical perspectives on the relationship between rangelands science/extension and pastoralist knowledge systems and concerns, however, suggest that pastoralists’ reception of such monitoring schemes will be influenced by a range of social contexts, including ...