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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Walking The Walk: A Phenomenological Study Of Long Distance Walking, Lee Crust, Richard J. Keegan, David Piggott, Christian F. Swann Jan 2011

Walking The Walk: A Phenomenological Study Of Long Distance Walking, Lee Crust, Richard J. Keegan, David Piggott, Christian F. Swann

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Evidence suggests that regular walking can elicit significant psychological benefits, although little evidence exists concerning long distance walking. The purpose of this study was to provide detailed accounts of the experiences of long distance walkers. Phenomenological interviews were conducted with six long distance walkers. Data were transcribed verbatim before researchers independently analyzed the transcripts. Participants reported a cumulative effect with positive feelings increasing throughout the duration of the walk. Long distance walking elicited positive emotions, reduced the effects of life-stress, and promoted an increased sense of well-being and personal growth. Results are aligned to theories and concepts from positive psychology ...


The Waitangi Tribunal And The Regulation Of Maori Protest, Juan M. Tauri, Robert Webb Jan 2011

The Waitangi Tribunal And The Regulation Of Maori Protest, Juan M. Tauri, Robert Webb

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Much of the current academic and political discourse related the development and operations of the Waitangi Tribunal over its first twenty years portray it as a forum that provided Maori with a meaningful avenue for settling Treaty grievances compared to the formal legal systems performance in the preceding 100 years. In contrast, we argue that from its inception and throughout much of the 1980s, the Waitangi Tribunal functioned primarily as an informal justice forum that assisted the New Zealand state's regulation of Maori Treaty activism during the transition from a Fordist to a Post-Fordist mode of capital accumulation.


Different Methods For Ethical Analysis In Health Technology Assessment: An Empirical Study, Samuli Saarni, Annette J. Braunack-Mayer, Bjorn Hofmann, Gert-Jan Van Der Wilt Jan 2011

Different Methods For Ethical Analysis In Health Technology Assessment: An Empirical Study, Samuli Saarni, Annette J. Braunack-Mayer, Bjorn Hofmann, Gert-Jan Van Der Wilt

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Objectives: Ethical analysis can highlight important ethical issues related to implementing a technology, values inherent in the technology itself, and value-decisions underlying the health technology assessment (HTA) process. Ethical analysis is a well-acknowledged part of HTA, yet seldom included in practice. One reason for this is lack of knowledge about the properties and differences between the methods available. This study compares different methods for ethical analysis within HTA.

Methods: Ethical issues related to bariatric (obesity) surgery were independently evaluated using axiological, casuist, principlist, and EUnetHTA models for ethical analysis within HTA. The methods and results are presented and compared.

Results ...


Understanding Corporate Responsibility: Culture And Complicity, Christopher J. Degeling, Cynthia Townley, Wendy Rogers Jan 2011

Understanding Corporate Responsibility: Culture And Complicity, Christopher J. Degeling, Cynthia Townley, Wendy Rogers

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Kipnis's fictional account of the televised treatment of Elaine Robbins clearly shows the surgeon's negligence (Kipnis 2011). The problems with Anodyne's support for the telesurgery breakfast are harder to discern, but show up clearly when we take into consideration how surgical evidence is generated, evaluated, and used by surgeons. Current evidentiary practices in surgery have two major weaknesses, related to the epistemic culture of surgery and to practices of knowledge transmission. We argue that this is a systemic problem, which companies such as Anodyne both contribute to and benefit from. Thus, while we agree with Kipnis's ...


Seasonal Differences In Physical Activity And Sedentary Patterns: The Relevance Of The Pa Context, Pedro Silva, Rute Santos, Gregory Welk, Jorge Mota Jan 2011

Seasonal Differences In Physical Activity And Sedentary Patterns: The Relevance Of The Pa Context, Pedro Silva, Rute Santos, Gregory Welk, Jorge Mota

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The aim of this pilot study was to characterize seasonal variationin the moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentarybehavior of Portuguese school youth, and understand theinfluence of activity choices and settings. The participants inthis study were 24 students, aged 10-13 years. Accelerometersmeasured daily PA over 7 consecutive days, in different seasonsMay - June and January - February. In summer, boys accumulatedmore minutes in MVPA (928 minutes/week) than girls(793 minutes/week). In winter the pattern was reversed withgirls accumulating more activity than boys (736 minutes/weekvs. 598 minutes/week). The repeated measures ANOVA revealedsignificant effects for season (F = 5.98 ...


Mental Illness In Policy Discourse: Locating The Criminal Justice System, Natalia K. Hanley, Stuart Ross Jan 2011

Mental Illness In Policy Discourse: Locating The Criminal Justice System, Natalia K. Hanley, Stuart Ross

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Abstract presented at the Australian Political Science Association 2011 Conference, 26-28 September 2011, Canberra, Australia


The Early Years And Later Development: Evidence And Social Policy, Edward Melhuish Jan 2011

The Early Years And Later Development: Evidence And Social Policy, Edward Melhuish

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Keynote address at the Growing Up in Ireland Annual Research Conference, 1 December 2011, Dublin, Ireland


Adoption Of An Infection Prevention And Control Programme (Ipcp) In The Republic Of Kiribati: A Case Study In Diffusion Of Innovations Theory, Peta-Anne Zimmerman, Heather Yeatman, Michael Jones, Helen Murdoch Jan 2011

Adoption Of An Infection Prevention And Control Programme (Ipcp) In The Republic Of Kiribati: A Case Study In Diffusion Of Innovations Theory, Peta-Anne Zimmerman, Heather Yeatman, Michael Jones, Helen Murdoch

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Abstract presented at the International Conference on Prevention & Infection Control (ICPIC 2011) Geneva, Switzerland. 29 June - 2 July 2011


Combining The Health Belief Model And Social Marketing To Develop A Community-Level Campaign About Asthma For Older Adults, Uwana Evers, Sandra C. Jones, Peter Caputi, Donald C. Iverson Jan 2011

Combining The Health Belief Model And Social Marketing To Develop A Community-Level Campaign About Asthma For Older Adults, Uwana Evers, Sandra C. Jones, Peter Caputi, Donald C. Iverson

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This conceptual paper provides a rationale for combining health behaviour theory with a social marketing framework in order to develop a community-level asthma campaign for adults aged 55 years and older. The prevalence of asthma in older adults in Australia is approximately 10%, higher than in many other countries, and asthma mortality increases with age. In addition, older adults' perceptions of asthma causes and treatments are often inaccurate. Many older adults believe that asthma is a childhood disease and that the effects of the condition are relatively minor and would not impact on daily life. In order to address these ...


Adolescent Sun Protection: An Examination Of The Prevalence Of Uv Exposure Indicators Among Brand Loyalty Segments, Melinda Williams, Sandra C. Jones, Donald C. Iverson, Peter Caputi Jan 2011

Adolescent Sun Protection: An Examination Of The Prevalence Of Uv Exposure Indicators Among Brand Loyalty Segments, Melinda Williams, Sandra C. Jones, Donald C. Iverson, Peter Caputi

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

No abstract provided.


Early Years Experience And Longer-Term Child Development: Research And Implications For Policymaking, Edward Melhuish Jan 2011

Early Years Experience And Longer-Term Child Development: Research And Implications For Policymaking, Edward Melhuish

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Why should we focus on the early years? One reason is the accumulation of evidence that indicates that the child's experience in the early years has profound consequences for later life. There are now many studies that present a consistent picture indicating that adversity in early life, such as frequently accompanies child poverty, is linked to: poor adult mental and physical health , adult mortality, anti-social and criminal behaviour, substance abuse and poor literacy and academic achievement.


Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme Cost Recovery, Glenn P. Salkeld Jan 2011

Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme Cost Recovery, Glenn P. Salkeld

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Since the beginning of 2010 the Australian Government has applied cost recovery to the listing process of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). Drug companies seeking to list their drugs on the PBS or vaccines on the National Immunisation Program pay a fee at two key points - upon lodgement of the application and at the pricing stage. The lodgement fee relates to the evaluation work of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) and all of its supporting administrative functions. The pricing fee relates to the pricing work of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Pricing Authority and its supporting functions. Companies that want an ...


Don’T Panic, Mobile Phones Are Still Only As Carcinogenic As Pickles, Rodney J. Croft Jan 2011

Don’T Panic, Mobile Phones Are Still Only As Carcinogenic As Pickles, Rodney J. Croft

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The World Health Organisation’s cancer agency, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), has classed mobile phones as Group 2B or “possibly carcinogenic” in a new report. In this Q+A Rodney Croft, Professor of Health Physiology at University of Wollongong, explains why we don’t need to panic.


Early Years Research And Policy, Edward Melhuish Jan 2011

Early Years Research And Policy, Edward Melhuish

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Presentation made at The 9th Meeting of the OECD Network on Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) - "Family and Community Engagement", 4-5 July 2011, Paris, France.


Teacher Knowledge Activated In The Context Of Designing Problems, Barbara Butterfield, Mohan Chinnappan Jan 2011

Teacher Knowledge Activated In The Context Of Designing Problems, Barbara Butterfield, Mohan Chinnappan

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The investigation of teachers' knowledge that informs practice in the mathematics classroom is an important area for research. This issue is addressed in our larger research program which is aimed at characterising the complexity and multi-dimensionality of this knowledge. A report on an earlier phase of this program (Butterfield & Chinnappan, 2010) showed that pre-service teachers tended to activate more common content knowledge than content that is required for teaching. We build on this previous work by examining the kinds of knowledge that a cohort of pre-service teachers activated in the context of designing a learning task.


Relevance Of The International Prognostic Index In The Rituximab Era, Kevin Tay, David Tai, Miriam Tao, Richard Quek, Tam C. Ha, Soon Thye Lim Jan 2011

Relevance Of The International Prognostic Index In The Rituximab Era, Kevin Tay, David Tai, Miriam Tao, Richard Quek, Tam C. Ha, Soon Thye Lim

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Letter to the editor


Phon: Free Software For Phonological Transcription And Analysis, Heather Buchan Jan 2011

Phon: Free Software For Phonological Transcription And Analysis, Heather Buchan

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Software review - Phon is an open-source program for the transcription and analysis of phonological and phonetic data. It was designed to help systematize research in children’s phonological development, but many functions in Phon, particularly the powerful search function, can be used for a wide range of investigations in phonetics and phonology. Phon is compatible with other language processing programs and is not just limited to English, making it a useful tool for documenting and analyzing the phonological system of any spoken language.


Sydney Multisite Intervention Of Laughterbosses And Elderclowns (Smile): Results From A Clustered Randomised Controlled Trial, Lee-Fay Low, Henry Brodaty, Anne-Nicole Casey, Belinda Goodenough, Peter Spitzer, J Bell, Lynn Chenoweth, Richard Fleming Jan 2011

Sydney Multisite Intervention Of Laughterbosses And Elderclowns (Smile): Results From A Clustered Randomised Controlled Trial, Lee-Fay Low, Henry Brodaty, Anne-Nicole Casey, Belinda Goodenough, Peter Spitzer, J Bell, Lynn Chenoweth, Richard Fleming

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Abstract from the International Psychogeriatric Association Reinventing Aging through Innovation 15th International Congress, 6-9 September 2011, The Hague, Netherlands.


It’S Time For Ronald Mcdonald To Hang Up The Red Wig, Sandra C. Jones Jan 2011

It’S Time For Ronald Mcdonald To Hang Up The Red Wig, Sandra C. Jones

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

More than 550 international health professionals and organisations have signed a letter to McDonald’s calling for the Ronald McDonald icon to be shelved.


Scaremongering On Today Tonight: The Truth About Wireless Radiation Risks, Rodney J. Croft Jan 2011

Scaremongering On Today Tonight: The Truth About Wireless Radiation Risks, Rodney J. Croft

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

In a recent episode of Channel Seven’s current affairs program Today Tonight, it was claimed that wireless devices in the home – such as cordless phones and routers – can cause a range of negative health effects, including: insomnia, depression, migraines and even cancer. These claims don’t bear scrutiny.


Does Religious Faith Make People Healthier And Happier?, Natascha Klocker, Brigid Trenerry, Kim Webster Jan 2011

Does Religious Faith Make People Healthier And Happier?, Natascha Klocker, Brigid Trenerry, Kim Webster

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

As immigrants from around the world have joined Australia’s cultural mix, an inevitable rise in religious diversity has followed. But has this made for a healthier society? A recent VicHealth study showed that while religion can protect against illness, religious discrimination can harm health. This has led to a renewed call to embrace and respect religious diversity.


Fast Food Loses Tick But Can The Heart Foundation Regain Its Credibility?, Sandra C. Jones Jan 2011

Fast Food Loses Tick But Can The Heart Foundation Regain Its Credibility?, Sandra C. Jones

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The Heart Foundation today announced plans to dump its tick from takeaway foods, citing unfair advantage for companies such as McDonalds over small takeaway outlets that can’t afford the accreditation fees. The tick will still be available to supermarket food manufacturers. So what does the tick actually mean? And does it improve consumer decisions? Professor Sandra Jones, the Director of the Centre for Health Initiatives at the University of Wollongong, explains: The Heart Foundation tick is perceived by consumers to mean a product is healthy. But it’s more complicated than that. The tick means a product is healthier ...


The Promise And Potential Of Botulinum Toxin-A: National Survey Of Therapy Practices, Bianca Kinnear, N Lannin, Anne Cusick Jan 2011

The Promise And Potential Of Botulinum Toxin-A: National Survey Of Therapy Practices, Bianca Kinnear, N Lannin, Anne Cusick

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Abstract from the 22nd Stroke Society of Australasia Annual Scientific Meeting, 14-16 September 2011, Adelaide, Australia.


The Type And Prevalence Of Activities Performed By Australian Children During The Lunchtime And After School Periods, Rebecca M. Stanley, Kate Ridley, Timothy Olds Jan 2011

The Type And Prevalence Of Activities Performed By Australian Children During The Lunchtime And After School Periods, Rebecca M. Stanley, Kate Ridley, Timothy Olds

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify the most prevalent reported activities performed by Australian children during the lunchtime and after school periods; and estimate the mean duration of a typical bout of the most prevalent activities performed during the lunchtime and after school periods. Design: This study was a secondary data analysis of the 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. Method: Use of time data were collected from Australian children aged 10.0-13.9 years (n = 794) using the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults (MARCA). The most prevalent self-reported activities for ...


Early Years Research And Implications For Policymaking: The Uk Experience, Edward Melhuish Jan 2011

Early Years Research And Implications For Policymaking: The Uk Experience, Edward Melhuish

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Why should we focus on the early years? One reason is the accumulation of evidence that indicates that the child's experience in the early years has profound consequences for later life. There are now many studies that present a consistent picture indicating that adversity in early life, such as frequently accompanies child poverty, is linked to: poor adult mental and physical health , adult mortality, anti‐social and criminal behaviour, substance abuse and poor literacy and academic achievement.


Research Round-Up 1981-2011, Anne Cusick Jan 2011

Research Round-Up 1981-2011, Anne Cusick

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Closing keynote address from the Occupational Therapy Australia 24th National Conference and Exhibition, 29 June - 1 July 2011, Gold Coast, Australia


Cold Pressor Stimulation Diminishes P50 Amplitude In Normal Subjects, Adam J. Woods, John W. Philbeck, Kenneth Chelette, Robert D. Skinner, Edgar Garcia-Rill, Mark Mennemeier Jan 2011

Cold Pressor Stimulation Diminishes P50 Amplitude In Normal Subjects, Adam J. Woods, John W. Philbeck, Kenneth Chelette, Robert D. Skinner, Edgar Garcia-Rill, Mark Mennemeier

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The present study examined how cold pressor stimulation influences electrophysiological correlates of arousal. We measured the P50 auditory evoked response potential in two groups of subjects who immersed their foot in either cold (0-2 degreees Celsius) or room temperature (22-24 degreees Celsius) water for 50 seconds. The P50, which was recorded before and after stimulation, is sleep-state dependent and sensitive to states of arousal in clinical populations. We found a significant reduction in P50 amplitude after exposure to cold, but not room temperature water. In comparison with other studies, these results indicate that cold pressor stimulation in normal subjects may ...


Neoliberalism And The Biophysical Environment 3: Putting Theory Into Practice, Noel Castree Jan 2011

Neoliberalism And The Biophysical Environment 3: Putting Theory Into Practice, Noel Castree

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

There now exists a significant body of theoretically informed empirical research into 'neoliberal environments'. It comprises numerous studies which together explore the connections between neoliberal principles and policies, on the one side, and the biophysical world on the other. However, making sense of them is by no means straightforward, despite their common focus on neoliberal environments. It is currently left to readers of these studies to synthesize them into a wider, joined-up account of neoliberal environments. This and two companion articles aim for precisely this sort of broad and coherent understanding. The contribution of this third instalment is twofold. First ...


The Future Of Geography In English Universities, Noel Castree Jan 2011

The Future Of Geography In English Universities, Noel Castree

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Geography in England is one of many university subjects that will be significantly restructured - with almost immediate effect - because of powerful external drivers altering research and teaching. In this commentary I want to speculate on the likely changes ahead, and to consider how university-based geographers in England might respond to them. Given the considerable international influence that geographers in England exert within the wider subject, this commentary ought to interest those working in other countries. Notwithstanding the perils of futurology, I consider some possible scenarios in the midst of a formative moment for higher education in the UK's largest ...


Ethnic Differences In Adolescent Mental Health Trajectories And The Influence Of Racism And Context: The Determinants Of Adolescent Social Well-Being And Health (Dash) Study, Thomas E. Astell-Burt, Maria J. Maynard, Erik Lenguerrand, Seeromanie Harding Jan 2011

Ethnic Differences In Adolescent Mental Health Trajectories And The Influence Of Racism And Context: The Determinants Of Adolescent Social Well-Being And Health (Dash) Study, Thomas E. Astell-Burt, Maria J. Maynard, Erik Lenguerrand, Seeromanie Harding

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Abstract presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies Inaugural Conference, 22-24 September 2010, Cambridge, United Kingdom.