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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Time To Stop Worrying: A Correlational Study On Individualist Versus Collectivist Time Perspectives And Anxiety, Anna Waldron Apr 2021

Time To Stop Worrying: A Correlational Study On Individualist Versus Collectivist Time Perspectives And Anxiety, Anna Waldron

Scholar Week 2016 - present

Presentation Location: Weber Center, Room 101

Abstract

Purpose

Research has indicated a significant relationship between anxiety and time perspective (TP), which is the way one views life in terms of the past, present or future. TP is broken down into five facets based on the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI), including past negative (PN), past positive (PP), present fatalistic (PF), present hedonistic (PH), and future (F) time perspectives (Zimbardo & Boyd, 1999). Time perspective is thought to be impacted by one’s culture, although there is a lack of representation in studies on TP cross-culturally which makes it difficult to generalize ...


Mental Health First Aid Training For College Students: Evaluation Of Effects On Students’ Knowledge And Responses To Mental Health Issues In Their Peers, Erica Sandtorv Apr 2019

Mental Health First Aid Training For College Students: Evaluation Of Effects On Students’ Knowledge And Responses To Mental Health Issues In Their Peers, Erica Sandtorv

Scholar Week 2016 - present

Background

Mental health literacy, or the public’s knowledge and beliefs about mental health, has been shown to be lacking; therefore, the proper first aid actions are not always taken to recognize and encourage treatment for psychological disorders. This issue is particularly relevant in a university setting where mental health issues are common and students often rely on their peers for support. Studies have shown mental health first aid (MFHA) training to be successful in equipping people with the skills they need to help others in acute mental health crises.

Methods

To assess the efficacy of a brief mental MHFA ...


Emotional Intelligence: The Effect On Social Media Use, Interpersonal Violence, And Gender, Gail Grabczynski Apr 2018

Emotional Intelligence: The Effect On Social Media Use, Interpersonal Violence, And Gender, Gail Grabczynski

Scholar Week 2016 - present

This study investigated the relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI), social media use, interpersonal violence and gender. EI is a relatively new topic of research that has been of interest to many organizations due to the proposition that EI assists in the development of individuals. With the proliferation of social media, interpersonal violence and women in the workforce, a determination of a relationship between EI and those variables was warranted. The study was conducted at a small private Christian university. An online survey was administered to 123 sophomores. This study was a cross-sectional quantitative design, that utilized three established instruments to ...


Grief Off-The-Clock: Supporting Hospice Professionals Through Personal Loss, Rachel A. Guimond Apr 2018

Grief Off-The-Clock: Supporting Hospice Professionals Through Personal Loss, Rachel A. Guimond

Scholar Week 2016 - present

Working with clients who die can have a major impact on the way professionals address their own grief. Daily exposure to the possibility of death alters the process of mourning and can leave professionals feeling disconnected from family and friends during times of grief. This presentation will look at the challenges that hospice workers, clergy members, social workers and other professionals face when they experience grief in their own lives. Evidence-based strategies for supporting professionals in their grief will also be explored.


The Hot-Cold Empathy Gap And Persuasion: Does Fatigue Boost Or Reduce The Argument Quality Effect?, Alison I. Young Apr 2018

The Hot-Cold Empathy Gap And Persuasion: Does Fatigue Boost Or Reduce The Argument Quality Effect?, Alison I. Young

Scholar Week 2016 - present

Research on the hot-cold empathy gap (Nordgren et al., 2007) suggests that participants currently experiencing some visceral state (e.g., fatigue) empathize more with others in that same state and evaluate them more positively when their behavior is impacted by it (e.g., a tired mother yelling at a cashier). Research on persuasion suggests that the quality of a persuasive message (strong vs. weak) has more of an impact among people for whom that message is more relevant (Ajzen, Brown & Rosenthal, 1996), but less of an impact among those who are distracted (Petty, Wells & Brock, 1976). In this study, I ...


Stigma As A Predictor Of Parental Willingness To Seek Mental Health Services For Their Children In Rural America, Reed M. Smith Apr 2018

Stigma As A Predictor Of Parental Willingness To Seek Mental Health Services For Their Children In Rural America, Reed M. Smith

Scholar Week 2016 - present

Background

Stigma exists in some capacity towards mental illness. This stigma is a barrier to mental health services for some people. Rural populations are known to have more stigma than their urban counterparts. This can be partly attributed to the rural value system and the lack anonymity in the tight-knit communities. This is on top of already lacking access to mental health services. This especially affects children. A 2015 study on low-income, urban, African-Americans found self-stigma as a predictor of help seeking. The first study focusing on parental stigma of seeking mental health services for their children in rural America ...


The Relationship Between Musicianship, Academic Motivation, Academic Achievement, And Self-Esteem, Ellie Krumsieg Apr 2018

The Relationship Between Musicianship, Academic Motivation, Academic Achievement, And Self-Esteem, Ellie Krumsieg

Scholar Week 2016 - present

Background

Past research indicates that music education has a positive influence on academic achievement and self-esteem. Intrinsic motivation is an accepted predictor of high academic achievement, and research suggests that students involved in music are intrinsically motivated. One study showed that undergraduate musicians possessed high levels of academic intrinsic motivation. This study attempts to explore the motivation, academic achievement, and self-esteem of collegiate musicians as compared to collegiate non-musicians.

Methods and Procedures

A survey link was emailed to all undergraduate students at a small, Christian university in the Midwest. Participants answered questions pertaining to their music involvement prompting for music ...


The Relationship Between Leadership Style And Volunteer Intention To Staymark, Mark E. Smith Apr 2017

The Relationship Between Leadership Style And Volunteer Intention To Staymark, Mark E. Smith

Scholar Week 2016 - present

Cohort XI


Predictable Politics: Whether Undergraduate Students’ College Majors Relate To Their Sociopolitical Views At Olivet Nazarene University, Joshua Dille Apr 2017

Predictable Politics: Whether Undergraduate Students’ College Majors Relate To Their Sociopolitical Views At Olivet Nazarene University, Joshua Dille

Scholar Week 2016 - present

By means of a campus-wide survey of current undergraduate ONU students, this correlational study (N = 1,277) determines the relationship between students’ chosen college major and their sociopolitical orientation. An online survey distributed in September 2016 collected information about students’ attitudes on various key issues, and the resulting data was analyzed in order to uncover patterns of sociopolitical orientation within specific groups of college majors. The results supported a statistically significant correlation between participants’ academic disciplines and sociopolitical views, even if the correlation was not very strong. These findings were assessed through the self-selection and socialization hypotheses as models for ...


What's More Important: Design Or Content? An Analysis Of The Impact Of Website Design, Argument Quality, And Need For Cognition On Information Assessment, Luke David Salomone Apr 2017

What's More Important: Design Or Content? An Analysis Of The Impact Of Website Design, Argument Quality, And Need For Cognition On Information Assessment, Luke David Salomone

Scholar Week 2016 - present

Author Abstract:

When evaluating information online or offline, two important aspects are considered by readers: the credibility of the source and the quality of the argument. It is well known that strong arguments are more persuasive than weak arguments of the same length (Petty and Cacioppo, 1984), and recent research has shown that in an online environment source credibility is determined by the reader in part by the design aspects of website (Lowry et al., 2013). Using a 2 (website quality: good vs bad) x 2 (argument quality: strong vs weak) ANCOVA with need for cognition (NFC) and disposition to ...