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Natural Resources and Conservation

2006

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Full-Text Articles in Physical Sciences and Mathematics

Cooperative Conservation: Increasing Capacity Through Community Partnerships -- Interagency Volunteer Program: Quarterly Progress Report, Period Ending December 31, 2006, Margaret N. Rees Dec 2006

Cooperative Conservation: Increasing Capacity Through Community Partnerships -- Interagency Volunteer Program: Quarterly Progress Report, Period Ending December 31, 2006, Margaret N. Rees

Get Outdoors Nevada

  • Volunteer database increased 8% over last quarter. Database now contains 2,923 records.
  • Website activity increased, recording an average of 51,568 hits per month, with an average of 4,985 pages viewed per month (12.4% increase in pages viewed).
  • Team charter approved and signed by federal managers and IVP team.
  • Volunteer orientation and training in 11 subject areas delivered to 80 volunteers.
  • Recognition Banquet and Awards Ceremony recognized 180 volunteers.
  • Volunteer event list revised for 2007.


Take Pride In America In Southern Nevada: Quarterly Progress Report, Period Ending December 31, 2006, Margaret N. Rees Dec 2006

Take Pride In America In Southern Nevada: Quarterly Progress Report, Period Ending December 31, 2006, Margaret N. Rees

Anti-littering Programs

• Don’t Trash Nevada roll-out event held on October 12, 2006.

• Program website launched.

• 74 people have taken the on-line anti-litter and dumping pledge.

• Public-private partnership with Republic Services of Southern Nevada generated $11,917.97 in donations to Don’t Trash Nevada.

• Conducted 3 volunteer and 1 alternative workforce clean-ups this quarter.

• Fulfilled deliverable of 12 clean-ups for 2006 (9 volunteer / 3 alternative workforce).

• 16 volunteer clean-ups scheduled for 2007. • Two tons of agency-generated paper recycled this quarter, saving 14,000 gallons of water, 34 trees, and almost 8 cubic yards of landfill space.

• Phase I judicial analysis draft ...


Water Quality Project: Mashpee River Study Dec 2006

Water Quality Project: Mashpee River Study

Watershed Access Lab Projects

Students from Mashpee High School have been studying water quality of local rivers for a number of years. In the past, the primary focus was on two rivers that flow through the town: the Quashnet River, and Quaker Run. This school year (2006-07) the Mashpee River was added as the third watershed of interest. Each of three Earth Science classes adopted and studied one of the rivers. Students sampled each stream at headwaters and lower reaches for: macroinvertebrates, water chemistry (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, nitrates, and turbidity) and stream flow (velocity and volume). Data were analyzed, and PowerPoint presentations were ...


Quashnet River Survey Dec 2006

Quashnet River Survey

Watershed Access Lab Projects

Students from Mashpee High School have been studying water quality of local rivers for a number of years. In the past, the primary focus was on two rivers that flow through the town: the Quashnet River, and Quaker Run. This school year (2006-07) the Mashpee River was added as the third watershed of interest. Each of three Earth Science classes adopted and studied one of the rivers. Students sampled each stream at headwaters and lower reaches for: macroinvertebrates, water chemistry (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, nitrates, and turbidity) and stream flow (velocity and volume). Data were analyzed, and PowerPoint presentations were ...


Following Fall Brook Dec 2006

Following Fall Brook

Watershed Access Lab Projects

This was a study of two sites along Fall Brook, located in Middleborough, MA. Fall Brook has been monitored by MHS students over the past 10 years and is a major tributary of the Taunton River Watershed. The purpose of the study completed this year was to determine how land use affects the nitrate and phosphate levels of Fall Brook. The Wareham Street Site is located next to a horse farm and downstream from several cranberry bogs in a heavily wooded area. The Wood Street Site is located in conservation land, downstream from the Wareham Street Site and has a ...


Water Quality Results From Indian Head River, Hanover, Ma Dec 2006

Water Quality Results From Indian Head River, Hanover, Ma

Watershed Access Lab Projects

No abstract provided.


Quaker Run Watershed Analysis Dec 2006

Quaker Run Watershed Analysis

Watershed Access Lab Projects

Students from Mashpee High School have been studying water quality of local rivers for a number of years. In the past, the primary focus was on two rivers that flow through the town: the Quashnet River, and Quaker Run. This school year (2006-07) the Mashpee River was added as the third watershed of interest. Each of three Earth Science classes adopted and studied one of the rivers. Students sampled each stream at headwaters and lower reaches for: macroinvertebrates, water chemistry (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, nitrates, and turbidity) and stream flow (velocity and volume). Data were analyzed, and PowerPoint presentations were ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2006/2007, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Dec 2006

The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2006/2007, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

The John Muir EWSLETTEB Two California Lions: John Muir & Luther Burbank by Roberta M. McDow, Stockton, CA I have long wanted to know you," John Muir wrote from his home in Martinez, California on January 6, 1910. "Strange how people so near are so long kept apart."1 His message accompanied a receipt dated December 29, 1909 for five dollars, about one hundred in today's currency, contributed to the Society for the Preservation of National Parks.2 A day later, Muir's letter arrived at its destination in Santa Rosa. The recipient was Luther Burbank. Burbank had lived in the area since 1875 when, as a young man of twenty-six, he left Massachusetts to join his brother Alfred.3 He thought his brother had settled on "the chosen spot of all this earth as far as Nature is concerned... ."4 Here he put down his roots and began his life's work in horticulture. Two decades earlier and less than forty miles away, John Strentzel had purchased land near Martinez where he grew a variety of fruit trees in search of the most suitable for the region. But all experimentation ceased when Strentzel's son-in-law, John Muir, became the manager of the Alhambra Valley property.5 Muir's goals were to provide for his family, finance his own scientific inquiries and have the time to pursue them. To him, plants were objects of beauty and love in the wild, but breeding them to produce more and better food was not his vocation. Yet Muir and Burbank had interests in common and in some ways their lives almost mirrored each other. Muir, born in Dunbar, Scotland on April 21, 1838, was about eleven years older than Burbank.6 The latter was born at Lancaster, Massachusetts on March 7, 1849, the same year the Muir family immigrated to America.7 Through his mother, Burbank was also of Scottish ancestry.8 Both men lived about seventy-seven years, Muir shy of that number by four months, Burbank over it by one.9 By 1910, Burbank had resided in Sonoma County for thirty-five years. Muir had lived in neighboring Contra Costa County for thirty. Both married relatively late in life: Muir to Louie Strentzel in 1880, when he was forty-two,10 Burbank to his first wife Helen Coleman in 1890 when he was forty-one.11 The formal education of both men ended before they received degrees. Muir studied at the University (continued on page 5) Page 1

NeWs & Notes. Muir Center Director Swagerty Follows Muir's Footsteps "Down under" From March 19 to April 29, Bill Swagerty followed John Muir's 1903-04 trek to New Zealand and Australia. Awarded a Fulbright Senior Specialist grant, Swagerty lectured at University of Waikato in Hamilton and at Victoria University, both on the North Island. Three of his talks focused on Muir: :Origins of John Muir's Environmentalism;" "John Muir's Life and Legacy;" and "John Muir in New Zealand." The trip began and ended in Auckland, New Zealand's largest city and a place Muir entered by steamer in January, 1904, returning after an extensive tour overland of both north and south islands by rail, stage, boat, and on foot. Bill Swagerty with the largest tree in New Zealand, the Kuari named "Tane Mahuta" meaning "God of the Forest." Muir did not see this tree, but was in the general area within the Waipoua Forest. Muir's purpose ...


Clear Creek Watershed: 150 Years Of Landscape Change, Andrew P. Rayburn, Lisa A. Schulte-Moore Dec 2006

Clear Creek Watershed: 150 Years Of Landscape Change, Andrew P. Rayburn, Lisa A. Schulte-Moore

Leopold Center Publications and Papers

This fact sheet summarizes the findings of a Leopold Center Ecology Initiative grant (2004-E08) that looked at landscape changes in the Clear Creek watershed in east central Iowa since 1940 using aerial photos and historical records.


Grassland Songbirds In A Dynamic Management Landscape: Behavioral Responses And Management Strategies, Noah G. Perlut, Allan M. Strong, Therese M. Donovan, Neil J. Buckley Dec 2006

Grassland Songbirds In A Dynamic Management Landscape: Behavioral Responses And Management Strategies, Noah G. Perlut, Allan M. Strong, Therese M. Donovan, Neil J. Buckley

Environmental Studies Faculty Publications

In recent decades, earlier and more frequent harvests of agricultural grasslands have been implicated as a major cause of population declines in grassland songbirds. From 2002 to 2005, in the Champlain Valley of Vermont and New York, USA, we studied the reproductive success of Savannah Sparrows (Passerculus sandwichensis) and Bobolinks (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) on four grassland treatments: (1) early-hayed fields cut before 11 June and again in early- to mid-July; (2) middle-hayed fields cut once between 21 June and 10 July; (3) late-hayed fields cut after 1 August; and (4) rotationally grazed pastures. Both the number of fledglings per female per ...


Koll Center Wetlands Natural Resources Maintenance Management Plan, Meredith Clayton Nov 2006

Koll Center Wetlands Natural Resources Maintenance Management Plan, Meredith Clayton

Master of Environmental Management Project Reports

The intention of this plan is to provide a vision and guidelines for maintaining and improving the ecological health of Koll Center Wetlands in the short and long term. Although the plan will change over time, the goal is to quantify natural resource needs spatially, temporally, and economically.

Koll Center Wetlands is part of the Greenway/Fanno Creek/Koll Center Wetlands Park complex. The nearly 13 acre park is dominated by aquatic habitats that attract a wide variety of wildlife, particularly birds. The park grounds are not easily traversed and experience limited human use, but there are many viewpoints from ...


Butterflies And Continuous Conservation Reserve Program Filter Strips: Landscape Considerations, Nicole M. Davros, Diane M. Debinski, Kathleen F. Reeder, William L. Hohman Nov 2006

Butterflies And Continuous Conservation Reserve Program Filter Strips: Landscape Considerations, Nicole M. Davros, Diane M. Debinski, Kathleen F. Reeder, William L. Hohman

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

Filter strips or buffers are areas of grass or other perennial herbaceous vegetation established along waterways to remove contaminants and sediments from agricultural field runoff. In the heavily cultivated regions of the Midwestern United States, these buffer zones established under the Farm Bill provide important habitat for wildlife such as butterflies. The question of how the landscape context of these plantings influences their use has not been adequately researched. We used multiple regression and Akaike’s Information Criteria to determine how habitat width and several landscape-level factors (i.e., landscape composition [total herbaceous cover, amount of developed area, and amount ...


Assistance With Wildlife Damage Problems In Nebraska, Scott E. Hygnstrom, John M. Hobbs, James G. Bruner, James Weverka, Dallas R. Virchow, Dennis M. Ferraro Oct 2006

Assistance With Wildlife Damage Problems In Nebraska, Scott E. Hygnstrom, John M. Hobbs, James G. Bruner, James Weverka, Dallas R. Virchow, Dennis M. Ferraro

Papers in Natural Resources

Nebraskans who experience damage and nuisance problems with wildlife can get assistance from several public and private organizations. This NebFact describes the most direct route to the solution of your problem. A reference guide (Table I) lists who to contact for information, materials, permits, and hands-on assistance. Wildlife play an important role in our environment. In addition, we gain many recreational, economic, and aesthetic benefits from them. Unfortunately, the activities of wildlife occasionally conflict with human interests in personal property, agricultural production, and health and safety. The most common wildlife damage and nuisance problems in Nebraska are caused by bats ...


Agenda: Celebrating The Centennial Of The Antiquities Act, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center, University Of Colorado Boulder. Center Of The American West Oct 2006

Agenda: Celebrating The Centennial Of The Antiquities Act, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center, University Of Colorado Boulder. Center Of The American West

Celebrating the Centennial of the Antiquities Act (October 9)

For 100 years, the Antiquities Act has been used by nearly every President in the 20th century to set aside and protect lands threatened with privatization and development. The list of lands first protected under the Antiquities Act – and that might never have been protected without it – is truly remarkable. Many of our most treasured national parks including the Grand Canyon, Olympic, Zion, Arches, Glacier Bay, and Acadia, began as national monuments. All told, Presidents have issued 123 proclamations setting aside millions of acres of land under the Antiquities Act.

The Natural Resources Law Center and the Center of the ...


The Road To The Antiquities Act And Basic Preservation Policies It Established, Francis P. Mcmanamon Oct 2006

The Road To The Antiquities Act And Basic Preservation Policies It Established, Francis P. Mcmanamon

Celebrating the Centennial of the Antiquities Act (October 9)

3 pages.


Slides: The Centennial Of The Antiquities Act: A Cause For Celebration?, James R. Rasband Oct 2006

Slides: The Centennial Of The Antiquities Act: A Cause For Celebration?, James R. Rasband

Celebrating the Centennial of the Antiquities Act (October 9)

Presenter: Professor James R. Rasband, Brigham Young University School of Law

20 slides


Notes On The Antiquities Act And Alaska, John Freemuth Oct 2006

Notes On The Antiquities Act And Alaska, John Freemuth

Celebrating the Centennial of the Antiquities Act (October 9)

2 pages.


Antiquities Act Monuments: The Elgin Marbles Of Our Public Lands?, James R. Rasband Oct 2006

Antiquities Act Monuments: The Elgin Marbles Of Our Public Lands?, James R. Rasband

Celebrating the Centennial of the Antiquities Act (October 9)

13 pages.

Includes bibliographical references


Slides: The Monumental Legacy Of The Antiquities Act Of 1906: The Rainbow Bridge National Monument In Context, Mark Squillace Oct 2006

Slides: The Monumental Legacy Of The Antiquities Act Of 1906: The Rainbow Bridge National Monument In Context, Mark Squillace

Celebrating the Centennial of the Antiquities Act (October 9)

Presenter: Professor Mark Squillace, Director, Natural Resources Law Center, University of Colorado School of Law

35 slides


Antipodean Inscapes: Reflection Of The Land As A Young Man, Michael Kantor Oct 2006

Antipodean Inscapes: Reflection Of The Land As A Young Man, Michael Kantor

Independent Study Project (ISP) Collection

The following paper contains a stand-alone piece of creative travel writing. ‘Cloud Juice’ is based on my interpretation of the experiences of the Fall 2006 Australia: Sustainability and the Environment semester. As it is my own personal interpretation it should not be placed in the category of non-fiction. Instead I have tried to write a story that presents the tone of my experience as honestly as possible, rather than simply telling the unbiased facts of the semester. My reason for writing this is to experiment with alternative methods of communicating the growth of an ecological ethic. By focusing on the ...


Ley Y Desorden: La Participación, La Política, Y La Planificación En El Archipiélago De Bocas Del Toro, Sage E. Trombulak Oct 2006

Ley Y Desorden: La Participación, La Política, Y La Planificación En El Archipiélago De Bocas Del Toro, Sage E. Trombulak

Independent Study Project (ISP) Collection

The Bocas del Toro Archipelago is quickly becoming one of Panama’s most popular destinations, both for tourists pursuing temporary fun-in-the-sun type activities and for wealthy Panamanians, Americans, and Europeans seeking a more permanent location for their vacation homes, luxury resorts, and retirement communities. These dual phenomena have become a subject of escalating concern for the political leadership in Bocas del Toro and for a plethora of local, regional, and international NGOs, as unprecedented levels of development are leading to the degradation of one of Panama’s most beautiful and biologically diverse landscapes, stresses on urban infrastructure, and rapid economic ...


Cooperative Conservation: Increasing Capacity Through Community Partnerships - Interagency Volunteer Program: Quarterly Progress Report, Period Ending September 30, 2006, Margaret N. Rees Sep 2006

Cooperative Conservation: Increasing Capacity Through Community Partnerships - Interagency Volunteer Program: Quarterly Progress Report, Period Ending September 30, 2006, Margaret N. Rees

Get Outdoors Nevada

  • Volunteer database increased 9.5% over last quarter. Database now contains 2,698 records.
  • Website activity decreased, recording an average of 42,488 hits per month, with an average of 4,435 pages viewed per month (3.6% decrease in pages viewed).
  • Volunteer recognition ceremony scheduled for November 4 at the Renaissance Hotel, Las Vegas.
  • Fall 2006 volunteer training schedule finalized.
  • National Public Lands Day volunteer projects successfully executed at Red Rock Canyon NCA and Lake Mead NRA, with a total of 232 community volunteers contributing more than 1,000 hours toward clean-up and restoration of Southern Nevada’s public ...


Take Pride In America In Southern Nevada: Quarterly Progress Report, Period Ending September 30, 2006, Margaret N. Rees Sep 2006

Take Pride In America In Southern Nevada: Quarterly Progress Report, Period Ending September 30, 2006, Margaret N. Rees

Anti-littering Programs

• Team members have been meeting regularly with other interagency teams to plan for the upcoming messaging campaign roll-out event, set for October 12, 2006.

• The Interagency Anti-Litter Team recycled over a ton of paper this quarter.

• A task order modification request was completed, submitted, and approved this quarter. The request will make more funds available for the messaging campaign.

• A multi-pronged media buy for the messaging campaign has been planned this quarter and will be initiated in October.

• The Anti-Litter Team worked with the Nevada Division of Forestry to complete Phase Two of a clean-up project on US Fish and ...


Planning For Robust Reserve Networks Using Uncertainty Analysis, Atte Moilanen, Michael C. Runge, Jane Elith, Andrew Tyre, Yohay Carmel, Eric Fegraus, Brendan A. Wintle, Mark Burgman, Yakov Ben-Haim Sep 2006

Planning For Robust Reserve Networks Using Uncertainty Analysis, Atte Moilanen, Michael C. Runge, Jane Elith, Andrew Tyre, Yohay Carmel, Eric Fegraus, Brendan A. Wintle, Mark Burgman, Yakov Ben-Haim

Papers in Natural Resources

Planning land-use for biodiversity conservation frequently involves computer-assisted reserve selection algorithms. Typically such algorithms operate on matrices of species presence–absence in sites, or on species-specific distributions ofmodel predicted probabilities of occurrence in grid cells. There are practically always errors in input data—erroneous species presence–absence data, structural and parametric uncertainty in predictive habitat models, and lack of correspondence between temporal presence and long-run persistence. Despite these uncertainties, typical reserve selection methods proceed as if there is no uncertainty in the data or models. Having two conservation options of apparently equal biological value, one would prefer the option whose ...


Price Elasticity Reconsidered: Panel Estimation Of An Agricultural Water Demand Function, Karina Schoengold, David L. Sunding, Georgina Moreno Sep 2006

Price Elasticity Reconsidered: Panel Estimation Of An Agricultural Water Demand Function, Karina Schoengold, David L. Sunding, Georgina Moreno

Papers in Natural Resources

Using panel data from a period of water rate reform, this paper estimates the price elasticity of irrigation water demand. Price elasticity is decomposed into the direct effect of water management and the indirect effect of water price on choice of output and irrigation technology. The model is estimated using an instrumental variables strategy to account for the endogeneity of technology and output choices in the water demand equation. Estimation results indicate that the price elasticity of agricultural water demand is -0.79, which is greater than that found in previous studies.


Ecophysiology Of Two Native Invasive Woody Species And Two Dominant Warm-Season Grasses In The Semiarid Grasslands Of The Nebraska Sandhills, Kathleen D. Eggemeyer, Tala Awada, David A. Wedin, F. Edwin Harvey, Xinhua Zhou Sep 2006

Ecophysiology Of Two Native Invasive Woody Species And Two Dominant Warm-Season Grasses In The Semiarid Grasslands Of The Nebraska Sandhills, Kathleen D. Eggemeyer, Tala Awada, David A. Wedin, F. Edwin Harvey, Xinhua Zhou

Papers in Natural Resources

Populations of Pinus ponderosa and Juniperus virginiana are expanding into semiarid Sandhills grasslands in Nebraska. To evaluate the physiological basis of their success, we measured the seasonal course of leaf gas exchange, plant water status, and carbon isotope discrimination in these two native trees and two native C4 grasses (Schizachyrium scoparium and Panicum virgatum). Compared to the trees, grasses had higher net photosynthetic rates (Anet) and water use efficiency (WUE) and more negative predawn and midday water potentials (Ψ) in June and July. While leaf Ψ and rates of leaf gas exchange declined for all four species during ...


Community Engagement, Education & Research, Public Lands Institute Sep 2006

Community Engagement, Education & Research, Public Lands Institute

Presentations (PLI)

The Public Lands Institute is dedicated to strengthening the national fabric that is essential for the protection, conservation, and management of public lands.


Bear River Resource Conservation And Development Council Area Plan, United States Department Of Agriculture, Natural Conservation Service, Bear River Resource Conservation And Development Council Sep 2006

Bear River Resource Conservation And Development Council Area Plan, United States Department Of Agriculture, Natural Conservation Service, Bear River Resource Conservation And Development Council

All U.S. Government Documents (Utah Regional Depository)

This five-year Area Plan is the guiding document for the Bear River RC&D Council, Inc. It identifies needs and opportunities and goals and objectives which lead the RC&D Council in its work.


Five-Year Watershed Action Plan For The Taunton River Watershed, Geosyntec Consultants Sep 2006

Five-Year Watershed Action Plan For The Taunton River Watershed, Geosyntec Consultants

Reference Documents

No abstract provided.


The Growing Together Guide: A Companion Resource To The New England Environmental Finance Center/Melissa Paly Film, New England Environmental Finance Center Sep 2006

The Growing Together Guide: A Companion Resource To The New England Environmental Finance Center/Melissa Paly Film, New England Environmental Finance Center

Smart Growth

What local leader or public official wants to be faced with an SOS the “same old story” of public discord and confrontation over growth and development in one’s community? That situation has become a problem for efforts to promote smart growth. Investments are needed in the walkable, compact, traditional‐streetscape and mixed use neighborhoods and developments that are more sustainable and healthy than sprawl, for both people and the landscape. Yet attempts at such change all too often end up mired in costly public controversy and stalemate.