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Medicine and Health Sciences Commons

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Research outputs 2014 to 2021

2015

Brain tumor

Oncology

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Medicine and Health Sciences

Support After Brain Tumor Means Different Things: Family Caregivers' Experiences Of Support And Relationship Changes, T. Ownsworth, E. Goadby, Suzanne K. Chambers Jan 2015

Support After Brain Tumor Means Different Things: Family Caregivers' Experiences Of Support And Relationship Changes, T. Ownsworth, E. Goadby, Suzanne K. Chambers

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

Shorter hospital stays and greater emphasis on outpatient care means that family members have the primary responsibility for supporting a person with brain tumor to manage the physical, cognitive, behavioral, and emotional effects of the illness and its treatment. Given the integral role of family caregivers, it is essential to understand their experience of the impact of brain tumor and their own support needs. Accordingly, this qualitative study aimed to investigate family caregivers' experiences of support and relationship changes in the context of brain tumor. In-depth interviews were conducted with 11 family caregivers (8 spouse/partner, 3 parents) of people with …


Integrating Psychosocial Care Into Neuro-Oncology: Challenges And Strategies, Suzanne K. Chambers, L. Grassi, M.K. Hyde, J. Holland, J. Dunn Jan 2015

Integrating Psychosocial Care Into Neuro-Oncology: Challenges And Strategies, Suzanne K. Chambers, L. Grassi, M.K. Hyde, J. Holland, J. Dunn

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

Approximately 256,000 cases of malignant brain and nervous system cancer were diagnosed worldwide during 2012 and 189,000 deaths, with this burden falling more heavily in the developed world. Problematically, research describing the psychosocial needs of people with brain tumors and their carers and the development and evaluation of intervention models has lagged behind that of more common cancers. This may relate, at least in part, to poor survival outcomes and high morbidity associated with this illness, and stigma about this disease. The evidence base for the benefits of psychosocial care in oncology has supported the production of clinical practice guidelines …