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Full-Text Articles in Medicine and Health Sciences

“Coronavirus Changed The Rules On Everything”: Parent Perspectives On How The Covid‐19 Pandemic Influenced Family Routines, Relationships And Technology Use In Families With Infants, Rebecca Hood, Juliana Zabatiero, Desiree Silva, Stephen R. Zubrick, Leon Straker Dec 2021

“Coronavirus Changed The Rules On Everything”: Parent Perspectives On How The Covid‐19 Pandemic Influenced Family Routines, Relationships And Technology Use In Families With Infants, Rebecca Hood, Juliana Zabatiero, Desiree Silva, Stephen R. Zubrick, Leon Straker

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

This study explores how the first wave of the COVID‐19 pandemic influenced family routines, relationships and technology use (smartphones and tablet computers) among families with infants. Infancy is known to be an important period for attachment security and future child development, and a time of being susceptible to changes within and outside of the family unit. A qualitative design using convenience sampling was employed. A total of 30 mothers in Perth, Western Australia participated in semi‐structured interviews by audio or video call. All mothers were parents of infants aged 9 to 15 months old. Interviews were audio‐recorded and transcribed, and …


Dental Professionals’ Perspectives Working With Aboriginal Children In Western Australia: A Qualitative Study, A. Durey, Lydia Hearn, S. Lund, M. O’Grady, L. Slack-Smith Sep 2021

Dental Professionals’ Perspectives Working With Aboriginal Children In Western Australia: A Qualitative Study, A. Durey, Lydia Hearn, S. Lund, M. O’Grady, L. Slack-Smith

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

Background:

The disproportionate burden of oral disease in Aboriginal children and the issues in accessing mainstream dental services are well documented. Yet little is known about dental professionals’ perspectives in providing oral care for Aboriginal children. This paper presents findings from a study exploring such perspectives.

Methods:

Semi-structured interviews were carried out in Western Australia following purposive sampling of non-Aboriginal dentists, dental clinic assistants (dental nurses) and oral health therapists/dental hygienists. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed guided by grounded theory for key themes related to the topic.

Results:

Findings included a service delivery model sometimes unresponsive to Aboriginal families’ …


Fathers’ Experiences Of Feeding Their Extremely Preterm Infants In Family-Centred Neonatal Intensive Care: A Qualitative Study, Evalotte Mörelius, Sofia Brogren, Sandra Andersson, Siw Alehagen Jan 2021

Fathers’ Experiences Of Feeding Their Extremely Preterm Infants In Family-Centred Neonatal Intensive Care: A Qualitative Study, Evalotte Mörelius, Sofia Brogren, Sandra Andersson, Siw Alehagen

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

Background:

Extremely preterm infants need advanced intensive care for survival and are usually not discharged before they reach the time of expected birth. In a family-centred neonatal intensive care unit both parents are involved at all levels of care including the feeding process. However, studies focusing on fathers in this situation are scarce. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of feeding extremely preterm infants in a neonatal intensive care unit from fathers’ perspectives.

Methods:

The study adopts a qualitative inductive method, reported according to the COREQ checklist. Seven fathers of extremely preterm infants (gestational age 24–27 …


Estimating The Magnitude And Risk Associated With Heat Exposure Among Ghanaian Mining Workers, Victor Fannam Nunfam, Kwadwo Adusei-Asante, Eddie Van Etten, Kwasi Frimpong, Jacques Oosthuizen Jan 2021

Estimating The Magnitude And Risk Associated With Heat Exposure Among Ghanaian Mining Workers, Victor Fannam Nunfam, Kwadwo Adusei-Asante, Eddie Van Etten, Kwasi Frimpong, Jacques Oosthuizen

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

Many occupational settings located outdoors in direct sun, such as open cut mining, pose a health, safety, and productivity risk to workers because of their increased exposure to heat. This issue is exacerbated by climate change effects, the physical nature of the work, the requirement to work extended shifts and the need to wear protective clothing which restricts evaporative cooling. Though Ghana has a rapidly expanding mining sector with a large workforce, there appears to be no study that has assessed the magnitude and risk of heat exposure on mining workers and its potential impact on this workforce. Questionnaires and …


Beliefs About Illness And Treatment Decision Modelling During Ill-Health In Arabic Families, Diana Arabiat, Lisa Whitehead, Mohammad Al Jabery, Ayman Hamdan-Mansour, Abeer Shaheen, Eman Abu Sabbah Jan 2021

Beliefs About Illness And Treatment Decision Modelling During Ill-Health In Arabic Families, Diana Arabiat, Lisa Whitehead, Mohammad Al Jabery, Ayman Hamdan-Mansour, Abeer Shaheen, Eman Abu Sabbah

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

Background: The use of self-prescribed antibiotics and other unproven herbal remedies is common in the Arab world. Understanding how family members decide to manage illness is an important priority for health care providers.

Purpose: This paper presents a new model that can be viewed as an extension to the Health Belief Model and help clarifies the cognitive processes families use to manage illness in an Arab family in Jordan. It aims to generate an understanding of family beliefs about the causes of illness and appraisal of how best to manage illness in an Arab family.

Methods: A qualitative approach using …


Digging For Data: How Sleep Is Losing Out To Roster Design, Sleep Disorders, And Lifestyle Factors, Gemma Maisey, Marcus Cattani, Amanda Devine, Johnny Lo, Shih Ching Fu, Ian C. Dunican Jan 2021

Digging For Data: How Sleep Is Losing Out To Roster Design, Sleep Disorders, And Lifestyle Factors, Gemma Maisey, Marcus Cattani, Amanda Devine, Johnny Lo, Shih Ching Fu, Ian C. Dunican

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

Shift workers employed at a remote mining operation may experience sleep loss, impaired alertness, and consequently negative health and safety outcomes. This study determined the sleep behaviors and prevalence of risk for sleep disorders among shift workers; and quantified alertness for a roster cycle. Sleep duration was significantly less following; night shift by 77 ± 7 min and day shift by 30 ± 7 min. The wake after sleep onset was less by 23 ± 3 min for night shifts and 22 ± 3 min for day shifts (p < 0.05 for all). The prevalence of risk for sleep apnea was 31%, insomnia was 8%, and shiftwork disorder was 44%. Average alertness for all working hours was 75%. Shiftwork in remote mining operations is a significant factor that leads to sleep loss and reduced alertness, which is exacerbated by the high prevalence of risk for sleep disorders.


Going-It Alone: The University Progression Of Women Nursing Students Who Are The First Person In Their Intimate Relationship To Go To University, Lesley Andrew, Leesa Costello, Ken Robinson, Julie Dare Jan 2021

Going-It Alone: The University Progression Of Women Nursing Students Who Are The First Person In Their Intimate Relationship To Go To University, Lesley Andrew, Leesa Costello, Ken Robinson, Julie Dare

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

© 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This article argues for an expansion of the idea of the first-in-family student to include the student whose spouse or partner has not been to university. Between 2015 and 2016, a qualitative longitudinal study, guided by Gadamer’s hermeneutic philosophy, was undertaken. Twenty-nine undergraduate women nursing students who began university in a heterosexual intimate relationship participated. All 29 were interviewed in their fourth semester of their degree (or part-time equivalent), and 23 of these 29 completed a second interview in their last semester. Thematic analysis of …


Putative Factors Influencing Knowledge And Behavioural Practices Of Health Science Undergraduate Students Towards Covid-19 Infection Ahead Of Re-Opening Universities In Ghana, Emmanuel Acheampong, Evans Asamoah Adu, Enoch O. Anto, Yaa Obirikorang, Eric Adua, Sylvester Yao Lopko, Emmanuella Nsenbah Acheampong, Agartha Odame Anto, Vivian Baah, Christian Obirikorang Jan 2021

Putative Factors Influencing Knowledge And Behavioural Practices Of Health Science Undergraduate Students Towards Covid-19 Infection Ahead Of Re-Opening Universities In Ghana, Emmanuel Acheampong, Evans Asamoah Adu, Enoch O. Anto, Yaa Obirikorang, Eric Adua, Sylvester Yao Lopko, Emmanuella Nsenbah Acheampong, Agartha Odame Anto, Vivian Baah, Christian Obirikorang

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) virus is a global pandemic affecting daily activities and delaying the reopening of several institutions such as universities. As a result, precautionary and preventive measures are being implemented to curtail the spread of the virus. However, knowledge and compliance measures are essential for adequate preparedness to reopen the universities amidst the pandemic. Methods: This cross-sectional study evaluated knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) along with factors influencing Health Science undergraduate students toward the COVID-19 infection pandemic in Ghana. A total of 606 students provided information regarding KAP of COVID-19 infection using an online questionnaire designed …


What Do We Know About The Nexus Between Culture, Age, Gender And Health Literacy? Implications For Improving The Health And Well-Being Of Young Indigenous Males, Anthony Merlino, James A. Smith, Mick Adams, Jason Bonson, Richard Osborne, Barry Judd, Murray Drummond, David Aanundsen, Jesse Fleay, Benjamin Christie Jan 2020

What Do We Know About The Nexus Between Culture, Age, Gender And Health Literacy? Implications For Improving The Health And Well-Being Of Young Indigenous Males, Anthony Merlino, James A. Smith, Mick Adams, Jason Bonson, Richard Osborne, Barry Judd, Murray Drummond, David Aanundsen, Jesse Fleay, Benjamin Christie

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

Health literacy, although diversely defined, refers to the abilities, relationships and external environments required for people to successfully promote health. Existing research suggests that health literacy is related to health inequities, including individual and community capacity to navigate health. A diverse range of factors shape health literacy abilities and environments, especially culture, gender and age. However, the nexus between these variables and their cumulative impact on health literacy development remains largely unexplored. Commentary that explores these dynamics among young Indigenous males is particularly scant. In turn, strategies to bridge health equity gaps have been obscured. This article brings together disparate …


Perceived Influence Of Value Systems On The Uptake Of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Among Men In Kweneng East, Botswana, Thandisizwe R. Mavundla, Fungai Mbengo, Khanyenda Bruce Ngomi Jan 2020

Perceived Influence Of Value Systems On The Uptake Of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Among Men In Kweneng East, Botswana, Thandisizwe R. Mavundla, Fungai Mbengo, Khanyenda Bruce Ngomi

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

© 2020 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Botswana is one of the countries in Eastern and Southern Africa significantly impacted by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). To control the spread of HIV, the government in 2009 rolled out the voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) programme as an additional HIV prevention strategy with the goal of circumcising 80% of HIV negative men by 2016. However, the country failed to achieve this goal as less than 30% of the targeted men were circumcised by 2016. A study was therefore conducted to explore and describe …


Friendly Schools Universal Bullying Prevention Intervention: Effectiveness With Secondary School Students, Donna Cross, Kevin C. Runions, Therese Shaw, Janice W. Y. Wong, Marilyn Campbell, Natasha Pearce, Sharyn Burns, Leanne Lester, Amy Barnes, Ken Resnicow Jan 2019

Friendly Schools Universal Bullying Prevention Intervention: Effectiveness With Secondary School Students, Donna Cross, Kevin C. Runions, Therese Shaw, Janice W. Y. Wong, Marilyn Campbell, Natasha Pearce, Sharyn Burns, Leanne Lester, Amy Barnes, Ken Resnicow

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

Peer bullying in schools is a significant public health problem that contributes to poor health and wellbeing outcomes for those who bully or are bullied. Meta-analyses of the efficacy of secondary school bullying prevention interventions have typically found no effects or an increase in student bullying. Consequently, few secondary school studies have examined the “real-world” effectiveness of these interventions. This age-cohort study design evaluated the effectiveness of the Friendly Schools (FS) secondary school intervention, previously found to be efficacious. FS was implemented in schools under real-world conditions by an education publisher. Student survey data were collected in 12 schools. The …


What Are The Characteristics Of Vitamin D Metabolism In Opioid Dependence? An Exploratory Longitudinal Study In Australian Primary Care, Albert Stuart Reece, Gary Hulse Jan 2018

What Are The Characteristics Of Vitamin D Metabolism In Opioid Dependence? An Exploratory Longitudinal Study In Australian Primary Care, Albert Stuart Reece, Gary Hulse

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

OBJECTIVE: Compare vitamin D levels in opioid dependence and control population and adjust for relevant confounding effects. Nuclear hormone receptors (including the vitamin D receptor) have been shown to be key transducers and regulators of intracellular metabolism and comprise an important site of pathophysiological immune and metabolic dysregulation potentially contributing towards pro-ageing changes observed in opioid-dependent patients (ODPs).

DESIGN: Longitudinal prospective comparing ODPs with general medical controls (GMCs).

SETTING: Primary care.

PARTICIPANTS: Prospective review comparing 1168 ODP (72.5% men) and 415 GMC (51.6% men, p

INTERVENTIONS: Nil. Observational study only.

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES: Serum vitamin D levels and relevant …


Drug Use Monitoring In Australia: An Expansion Into The Pilbara, Natalie Gately, Suzanne Ellis, Robyn Morris Jan 2016

Drug Use Monitoring In Australia: An Expansion Into The Pilbara, Natalie Gately, Suzanne Ellis, Robyn Morris

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

The relationship between alcohol, illicit drugs and offending is complex and dynamic. Substance misuse both nationally and internationally has been found to be prevalent in detained populations (Bennett & Holloway 2007, Pernanen, Cousineau, Brochu & Sun 2002, Sweeney & Payne 2012). With the cost of crime in Australia estimated to be $36 billion per annum (AIC 2009), it is important to establish some of the links that, if addressed, may reduce the level of commissions of crime and increase the wellbeing of Australians.


Predictors Of Sun Protection Behaviours And Sunburn Among Australian Adolescents, Simone Pettigrew, Michelle Jongenelis, Mark Strickland, Carolyn Minto, Terry Slevin, Geoffrey Jalleh, Chad Lin Jan 2016

Predictors Of Sun Protection Behaviours And Sunburn Among Australian Adolescents, Simone Pettigrew, Michelle Jongenelis, Mark Strickland, Carolyn Minto, Terry Slevin, Geoffrey Jalleh, Chad Lin

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

Background

Excessive sun exposure and sunburn increase individuals’ risk of skin cancer. It is especially important to prevent sunburn in childhood due to the higher relative risk of skin cancer across the life span compared to risk associated with sunburn episodes experienced later in life. This study examined demographic and attitudinal factors associated with engagement in a range of sun protection behaviours (wearing a hat, wearing protective clothing, staying in the shade, and staying indoors during the middle of the day) and the frequency of sunburn among Western Australian adolescents to provide insights of relevance for future sun protection campaigns. …


Engaging Australian Aboriginal Narratives To Challenge Attitudes And Create Empathy In Health Care: A Methodological Perspective, Toni D. Wain, Moira Sim, Dawn Bessarab, Donna Mak, Colleen Hayward, Cobie Rudd Jan 2016

Engaging Australian Aboriginal Narratives To Challenge Attitudes And Create Empathy In Health Care: A Methodological Perspective, Toni D. Wain, Moira Sim, Dawn Bessarab, Donna Mak, Colleen Hayward, Cobie Rudd

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

Background:

Unconscious bias and negative attitudes towards minority groups have detrimental effects on the way health care is, or is not, provided to these groups. Recognition of racist attitudes and behaviours as well as understanding clients' experiences of health and health care are pivotal to developing better health care strategies to positively impact on the quality and safety of care provided to Indigenous people. Indigenous research demands inclusive research processes and the use of culturally appropriate methodologies. This paper presents a methodological account of collecting narratives which accurately and respectfully reflect Aboriginal Australians' experiences with health care in Western Australia. …


Aboriginal Health Worker Perceptions Of Oral Health: A Qualitative Study In Perth, Western Australia, Angela Durey, Dan Mcaullay, Barry Gibson, Linda Slack-Smith Jan 2016

Aboriginal Health Worker Perceptions Of Oral Health: A Qualitative Study In Perth, Western Australia, Angela Durey, Dan Mcaullay, Barry Gibson, Linda Slack-Smith

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

Background:

Improving oral health for Aboriginal Australians has been slow. Despite dental disease being largely preventable, Aboriginal Australians have worse periodontal disease, more decayed teeth and untreated dental caries than other Australians. Reasons for this are complex and risk factors include broader social and historic determinants such as marginalisation and discrimination that impact on Aboriginal people making optimum choices about oral health. This paper presents findings from a qualitative study conducted in the Perth metropolitan area investigating Aboriginal Health Workers’ (AHWs) perceptions of barriers and enablers to oral health for Aboriginal people.

Methods:

Following extensive consultation with Aboriginal stakeholders, …


Young Australian Adults’ Reactions To Viewing Personalised Uv Photoaged Photographs, Lori L. Presti, Paul Chang, Myra F. Taylor Jan 2014

Young Australian Adults’ Reactions To Viewing Personalised Uv Photoaged Photographs, Lori L. Presti, Paul Chang, Myra F. Taylor

Research outputs 2014 to 2021

Background: Despite two nationwide sun-protection awareness campaigns, young Australian adults continue to sunbathe. Since their primary motivation for tanning is appearance enhancement, it may well be that campaigns that highlight the negative effects of tanning on appearance are more effective than campaigns that emphasise the health risks associated with sun exposure.Aims: This study aims to explore young adults’ reactions to viewing a photoaged photograph of the sun damage already visible in their facial image.Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven females and three males aged 20-30 years. The interview transcripts were transcribed verbatim and were then subjected to Interpretive Phenomenological …