Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Medicine and Health Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Cardiology

Elderly

2022

Articles 1 - 1 of 1

Full-Text Articles in Medicine and Health Sciences

Retrospective Comparison Of Patients ≥ 80 Years With Atrial Fibrillation Prescribed Either An Fda-Approved Reduced Or Full Dose Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulant, Roy Taoutel, Michael D. Ezekowitz, Usman A. Chaudhry, Carly Weber, Dana Hassan, Ed J. Gracely, Mohammed H. Kamareddine, Benjamin I. Horn, Glenn R. Harper Oct 2022

Retrospective Comparison Of Patients ≥ 80 Years With Atrial Fibrillation Prescribed Either An Fda-Approved Reduced Or Full Dose Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulant, Roy Taoutel, Michael D. Ezekowitz, Usman A. Chaudhry, Carly Weber, Dana Hassan, Ed J. Gracely, Mohammed H. Kamareddine, Benjamin I. Horn, Glenn R. Harper

Department of Medicine Faculty Papers

Direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represent the standard for preventing stroke and systemic embolization (SSE) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). There is limited information for patients ≥ 80 years. We report a retrospective analysis of AF patients ≥ 80 years prescribed either a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved reduced (n = 514) or full dose (n = 199) DOAC (Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, or Apixaban) between January 1st, 2011 (first DOAC commercially available) and May 31st, 2017. The following multivariable differences in baseline characteristics were identified: patients prescribed a reduced dose DOAC were older (p < 0.001), had worse renal function (p = 0.001), were more often prescribed aspirin (p = 0.004) or aspirin and clopidogrel (p < 0.001), and more often had new-onset AF (p = 0.001). SSE and central nervous system (CNS) bleed rates were low and not different (1.02 vs 0 %/yr and 1.45 vs 0.44 %/yr) for the reduced and full dose groups, respectively. For non-CNS bleeds, rates were 10.89 vs 4.15 %/yr (p < 0.001, univariable) for the reduced and full doses, respectively. The mortality rate was 6.24 vs 1.75 %/yr (p = 0.001, univariable) for the reduced and full doses. Unlike the non-CNS bleed rate, mortality rate differences remained significant when adjusted for baseline characteristics. Thus, DOACs in patients ≥ 80 with AF effectively reduce SSE with a low risk of CNS bleeding, independent of DOAC dose. The higher non-CNS bleed rate and not the mortality rate is explained by the higher risk baseline characteristics in the reduced DOAC dose group. Further investigation of the etiology of non-CNS bleeds and mortality is warranted.