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Swine day

1978

Articles 1 - 18 of 18

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Myoclonia Congenita (Trembling Piglets), H W. Leipold, R Scarsi, D Schoneweis, R Milleret, R Phillips Jan 1978

Myoclonia Congenita (Trembling Piglets), H W. Leipold, R Scarsi, D Schoneweis, R Milleret, R Phillips

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

An epidemiologic survey was conducted on ten swine farms in Kansas and two in Nebraska (1878 piglets in 251 litters) to determine the incidence, clinical signs, and cause of myoclonia corrgenita. The percentage of litters with myoclonia congenita was 37.45%, ranging from 4.35% to 100%. Morbidity rate was 37.5%, which is lower than rates in previous surveys in the United States. Mortality rate in all pigs was 17.73% while the fatality rate of affected pigs was 47.2%.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 9, 1978


Managing The Breeding Herd, Duane L. Davis Jan 1978

Managing The Breeding Herd, Duane L. Davis

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Successful swine producers pay careful attention to the breeding herd. The members of our producer panel will present three approaches to managing reproduction. Their ideas are of particular interest since each is a successful manager. This paper will serve as an outline of topics to be discussed. Basically the same problems occur in all common management systems; however, particular problems may be exaggerated under certain conditions. A well-known example is failure of gilts to reach puberty at an acceptable age. While some producers in all types of facilities experience this problem, complaints are considerably more frequent when gilts are bred ...


Using Oral E. Coli Milk Vaccine To Control Colibacillosis, D A. Schoneweis, V Gaeth Jan 1978

Using Oral E. Coli Milk Vaccine To Control Colibacillosis, D A. Schoneweis, V Gaeth

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Colibacillosis is still a costly disease to swine producers in spite of new antibiotics and other products and procedures used to prevent or treat the disease. A recent aid in controlling the disease is the oral E. coli milk vaccine developed by Dr. Irvin Kohler. It consists of isolating a pathogenic E. coli from the herd and feeding the organism to pregnant sows to stimulate colostral antibodies. It is a giant step forward from the earlier recommendation of the late Dr. Howard Dunne who suggested taking the bedding and feces from the farrowing house and feeding it to pregnant sows ...


The Evaluation Of Virginiamycin In Feed As A Treatment For Swine Dysentery In Heavy (More Than 120 Lbs.) Hogs, D A. Schoneweis Jan 1978

The Evaluation Of Virginiamycin In Feed As A Treatment For Swine Dysentery In Heavy (More Than 120 Lbs.) Hogs, D A. Schoneweis

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Virginiamycin at 100 grams per ton of feed was effective as a treatment against swine dysentery. The only pig receiving Virginiamycin that died during treatment had concurrent gangrenous pneumonia --probably the major cause of death. The pigs receiving the feed with Virginiamycin were more alert and ate more than the controls--which resulted in more weight gain and improved feed conversion. The Virginiarnycin did not clear up all signs of dysentery as several pigs continued to have diarrhea. Pigs that had been on Virginiamycin began to break with dysentery six days after the antibiotic was withdrawn and a pig weighing 234 ...


Evaporative Cooling Systems For Swine, D R. Ames, David A. Nichols, Robert H. Hines Jan 1978

Evaporative Cooling Systems For Swine, D R. Ames, David A. Nichols, Robert H. Hines

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

During heat stress swine must rely an evaporation as a mechanism for heat loss. Providing water via sprinklers, showers, and foggers is a practical method of reducing heat stress. It is imperative in any evaporative system that animals are permitted to dry, because the evaporation of water is fundamental to evaporative cooling. Ideally, hogs should be wetted and then given time to dry, followed by successive wetting and drying. Studies are under way to investigate various systems of wetting hogs to take maximum advantage of evaporative cooling.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 9, 1978


Evaluation Of A Concentrated Milk Replacer And A Vitamin-Amino Acid-Iron-Electrolyte Supplement On Baby Pig Survival And Performance, D A. Schoneweis, Robert H. Hines Jan 1978

Evaluation Of A Concentrated Milk Replacer And A Vitamin-Amino Acid-Iron-Electrolyte Supplement On Baby Pig Survival And Performance, D A. Schoneweis, Robert H. Hines

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Litters offered a concentrated milk replacer and the vitamin amino acid, iron-electrolyte supplement, weighed the same as control litters at day 10, 14, 21, and 28. Blood analysis revealed no difference in packed cell volume, hemoglobin, or plasma protein between litters offered the supplement and control litters. Survival rate from birth to weaning favored the control litters (93.9 or 85.3%), however all nineteen litters used in this study were healthy with very little scours observed.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 9, 1978


Modification Of Ksu Swine Finishing Facility Hovers, Floors, Or Supplemental Heat, B A. Koch, G L. Allee, Robert H. Hines Jan 1978

Modification Of Ksu Swine Finishing Facility Hovers, Floors, Or Supplemental Heat, B A. Koch, G L. Allee, Robert H. Hines

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two trials were conducted to evaluate the benefits of modifying the KSU swine finishing barn by adding hovers, flooring, or both with and without supplemental heat. In trial 1, pigs with no supplemental heat, hover or floor gained significantly poorer than pigs with supplemental heat plus floor, supplemental heat plus hover and floor, or no heat and floor. Pigs with no heat but with hover, floor or both gained similarly with pigs having the benefit of supplemental heat plus modifications. Average daily gain and feed per lb gain were similar for pigs exposed to supplemental heat and those exposed to ...


Effects Of Feeding A Heat Processed, Predigested Liquid Diet To Three-Week Old Weanling Pigs, S F. Binder, E R. Skoch, C W. Deyoe, G L. Allee, Keith C. Behnke Jan 1978

Effects Of Feeding A Heat Processed, Predigested Liquid Diet To Three-Week Old Weanling Pigs, S F. Binder, E R. Skoch, C W. Deyoe, G L. Allee, Keith C. Behnke

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

One hundred forty, three-week old weanling pigs were used to evaluate the effects of feeding a heat-processed, predigested liquid diet. In Trial I, pigs were randomly allotted to a dry crumbled diet or a processed liquid diet. The basal corn-soybean meal diet contained 20% protein. A preference trial and a digestion trial were also conducted using the same treatments. A second feeding trial was conducted using a basal diet which contained 30% whey. Treatments consisted of a dry meal diet, a dry meal + water diet, and a processed liquid diet.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 9, 1978


The Relationship Between Body Measurements And Performance Traits Of Selected Barrows Carried To Heavy Weights, D H. Carnahan, Robert H. Hines Jan 1978

The Relationship Between Body Measurements And Performance Traits Of Selected Barrows Carried To Heavy Weights, D H. Carnahan, Robert H. Hines

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Forty-seven Yorkshire barrows were selected for large and small scale test groups by using body height and length as a selection index. Initially the index between groups differed; however, the same measurements gave indexes that were nearly equal when the pigs weighed 210 and 300 lbs. Large scale barrows gained faster per day than did small scale barrows from start to 210 lbs; however, there were no differences in feed efficiency or backfat thickness. No differences were observed between scale groups fed to 300 lbs for the traits of average daily gain, feed efficiency, backfat thickness, carcass length, or loin ...


Evaluation Of Various Antibiotics On Growth Rate And Feed Efficiency Of Finishing Pigs, G L. Allee, M Noll Jan 1978

Evaluation Of Various Antibiotics On Growth Rate And Feed Efficiency Of Finishing Pigs, G L. Allee, M Noll

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We used 150 Yorkshire finishing pigs averaging 120 lbs initially to evaluate the following antibotics: Tylan, Stafac, Oleandomycin, and Flavomycin on rate and efficiency of gain. The trial ended when pigs within a replicate averaged approximately 220 lbs. There were no significant differences in rate or efficiency of gain by pigs fed nonmedicated or medicated diets.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 9, 1978


Effect Of Fat Thickness And Temperature On Adg And F/G Ratio In Finishing Swine, David A. Nichols, D R. Ames, G L. Allee, Robert H. Hines Jan 1978

Effect Of Fat Thickness And Temperature On Adg And F/G Ratio In Finishing Swine, David A. Nichols, D R. Ames, G L. Allee, Robert H. Hines

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Fat and lean pigs were observed at temperatures of 0(32F), 5(41F), 10(50F), 15(59F), and 20C(68F). In comparing fat and lean pigs no significant differences were observed in feed-to-gain ratio or average daily gain. Pigs housed at 32 and 41F gained significantly slower and less efficiently than those housed at 50, 59, or 68F. No differences in performance were observed among the last three groups. Increased huddling, longer hair coats and increased shivering were observed at the lower temperatures.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 9, 1978


Effect Of Feeding Oats And Oat Hulls On Performance Of Weanling Pigs, A J. Thulin, G L. Allee, Robert H. Hines Jan 1978

Effect Of Feeding Oats And Oat Hulls On Performance Of Weanling Pigs, A J. Thulin, G L. Allee, Robert H. Hines

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two hundred twenty-eight Yorkshire pigs, weaned at 5 weeks of age and averaging 8.4 kg. (18.46 lbs) were used to determine how feeding them various levels of oats, oat hulls, and oats plus fat would effect their performance. Adding oats or oat hulls to increase fiber content of the diets resulted in similar rates of gain, even though the diets contained up to 7.3% fiber. Pigs fed a diet containing 7.3% fiber, however had significantly poorer feed efficiency and daily feed intake than pigs fed the other diets tested. Pigs fed diets containing 10%, 20%, 30 ...


Teat Necrosis In Newborn Gilts, D A. Schoneweis Jan 1978

Teat Necrosis In Newborn Gilts, D A. Schoneweis

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Marked enlargement and edema of the vulva are often noted in newborn gilts. An accompanying, but less conspicuous, lesion is enlarged, engorged mammary glands. Although not fully understood, the changes are thought to result from increased estrogen in sows before they farrow. The edema of the vulva usually causes no lasting problems but enlarged mammary glands are more susceptible to injury from a rough surface like concrete slats. Such injuries may lead to teat necrosis and fibrosis, which makes nipples appear inverted and they are often nonfunctional when the gilts farrow. The incidence of teat necrosis can be reduced by ...


Arthrogryposis In Piglets, H W. Leipold, R Ely, D Schoneweis Jan 1978

Arthrogryposis In Piglets, H W. Leipold, R Ely, D Schoneweis

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This report documents experimental reproduction of tetramelic arthrogryposis in purebred Yorkshire swine by breeding trials. Data from the trials indigated arthrogryposis may be due to homozygosity of a simple autosomal recessive gene. No affected pig was observed to be alive at parturition, although most had been alive in utero just prior to delivery. Other than dystocia observed in the sows, no other significant clinical findings were noted. The condition was noted in five litters from two sows which were bred to the same boar. Approximately 25% of the pigs exhibited the clinical signs of arthrogryposis which included malformed rigidly extended ...


Pelleting Corn-Soybean Meal Swine Diets, E R. Skoch, S F. Binder, C W. Deyoe, G L. Allee, Keith C. Behnke Jan 1978

Pelleting Corn-Soybean Meal Swine Diets, E R. Skoch, S F. Binder, C W. Deyoe, G L. Allee, Keith C. Behnke

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

One hundred forty-six pigs were used to study the effects of steam pelleting a corn-soybean meal diet on pig performance. Treatments included ground meal, meal steam conditioned to 80 C (176 ÌŠF) before pelleting, meal pelleted without steam conditioning, and a meal diet with 2% molasses replacing corn. Steam-conditioning the meal before pelleting resulted in less starch damage, and less electrical energy was required for pelleting. Pellet durability was considerably increased with steam conditioning. None of the processing methods studied caused significant (P<.05) improvement in daily gain, feed efficiency, or energy digestibility for weanling pigs. A significant improvement (P<.05) over the control diet in feed efficiency and energy digestibility, was found with either pelleting treatment for grower-finisher pigs. However, daily gain was not significantly (P<.05) improved.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 9, 1978


Selection For Muscling In Durocs, J D. Wheat, Donald H. Kropf, P Na-Lampang, Robert H. Hines Jan 1978

Selection For Muscling In Durocs, J D. Wheat, Donald H. Kropf, P Na-Lampang, Robert H. Hines

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Select line pigs were compared with those in the control line for growth patterns, production traits, and carcass quality. Heritability and genetic correlations were calculated for certain production and carcass traits after five generations of selection.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 9, 1978


Effect Of Adding Fat To Diets During Late Gestation And Lactation, G L. Allee, J Salava Jan 1978

Effect Of Adding Fat To Diets During Late Gestation And Lactation, G L. Allee, J Salava

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Recent research at the University of Nebraska suggest that feeding sows high level of fat (15-20%) during late gestation and lactation may increase energy stores in the newborn pig and increase their survival. Adding fat to sows diets increases the fat content of the milk and therefore increases its energy content. The present studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of feeding 6% fat to sows and gilts during late gestation and lactation on pig survival and performance from birth to weaning (14 or 21 days).; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 9, 1978


Performance Of Pigs Fed Corn, Sorghum, Or Wheat With 0 Or 4% Added Fat, G L. Allee Jan 1978

Performance Of Pigs Fed Corn, Sorghum, Or Wheat With 0 Or 4% Added Fat, G L. Allee

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We used 96 crossbred pigs averaging 8.3 kg (19.3 lbs.) to compare performances with sorghum, corn, or wheat with 0 or 4% added fat (tallow). The trial ended when pigs averaged approximately 220 pounds. Grain source (sorghum, corn, or wheat) did not affect average daily gain or feed efficiency of pigs during any ration phase (starter, grower, or finisher). Adding fat (to each grain ration) reduced feed intake and improved feed efficiency during each ration phase. The greatest improvement in feed efficiency from added fat was during the finishing phase.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 9, 1978