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Cattlemen's Day

2007

Articles 31 - 36 of 36

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Validation Of Commercial Dna Tests For Beef Quality Traits, A.L. Van Eenennaam, J. Li, R.M. Thallman, R.L. Quaas, C. Gill, D.E. Franke, M.G. Thomas, Michael E. Dikeman Jan 2007

Validation Of Commercial Dna Tests For Beef Quality Traits, A.L. Van Eenennaam, J. Li, R.M. Thallman, R.L. Quaas, C. Gill, D.E. Franke, M.G. Thomas, Michael E. Dikeman

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Gene mapping and discovery programs have resulted in the detection of numerous DNA "˜markers' for various beef cattle production traits. Prior to commercializing genetic markers, it is important to validate their purported effects on the traits of interest in different breeds and environments, and assess them for correlated responses in associated traits. One of the biggest challenges in achieving this objective is the availability of cattle populations with sufficient phenotypic data to assess the association between various traits and newly discovered genetic markers. Results from such validation studies to date have not been widely published and genetic marker tests sometimes ...


Comparison Of Feed Efficiency Rankings Of Heifers Fed Low And High Energy Dense Diets, J.A. Christopher, T.T. Marston Jan 2007

Comparison Of Feed Efficiency Rankings Of Heifers Fed Low And High Energy Dense Diets, J.A. Christopher, T.T. Marston

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Concepts related to energy efficiency in cattle have been the basis for many research projects. Even though differences in individuals have long been recognized, little effort has been focused on the causes of the observed variations. The concept of residual feed intake was first introduced in 1963, and is calculated as the difference between actual feed intake by an animal and its expected feed intake based on body weight and growth rate. Residual feed intakes are phenotypically independent of the production traits used to calculate expected feed intake. Consequently, residual feed intake values can be useful in comparing individuals differing ...


Supplementation Of Stocker Steers Grazing Native Flint Hills Pasture With A Protein And Mineral Supplement Increases Average Daily Gains, B.B. Barnhardt, M.P. Epp, A.M. Bryant, P.J. Guiroy, Dale A. Blasi Jan 2007

Supplementation Of Stocker Steers Grazing Native Flint Hills Pasture With A Protein And Mineral Supplement Increases Average Daily Gains, B.B. Barnhardt, M.P. Epp, A.M. Bryant, P.J. Guiroy, Dale A. Blasi

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Supplementation of range cattle with minerals is a common management practice that is used to maximize performance. Flint Hills grasses provide an adequate amount of protein for the diet through the first half of a doublestock grazing period, but declining protein content of native grasses during the latter parts of the grazing season typically cause decreases in forage digestibility and daily gains. The goal of this experiment was to measure differences in performance between steers that were supplemented with a) loose salt for the entire grazing period, b) a stocker mineral supplement for the entire grazing period, or c) a ...


Dried Distiller’S Grains Improve The Performance Of Beef Cattle Intensively Grazing Early Summer Bluestem Pasture, M. Epp, B. Barnhardt, A. Bryant, Dale A. Blasi Jan 2007

Dried Distiller’S Grains Improve The Performance Of Beef Cattle Intensively Grazing Early Summer Bluestem Pasture, M. Epp, B. Barnhardt, A. Bryant, Dale A. Blasi

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Distiller's grains are byproducts of the production of ethanol from grains and are an excellent source of protein and energy for cattle. The most prevalent use of distiller's grains is in the finishing beef production sector. There is limited research available that has evaluated effectiveness of distiller's grains as a supplement for grazing beef cattle. Digestible protein content in grass begins to decrease in midsummer, resulting in lower average daily gains. The objective of this study was to measure the daily gain of yearling steers supplemented with different levels of dried distiller's grains while grazing doublestock ...


Microbial Use Of Recycled Urea Is Dependent On The Level And Frequency Of Degradable Intake Protein Supplementation, T.A. Wickersham, R.C. Cochran, E.E. Wickersham, E.S. Moore, Evan C. Titgemeyer Jan 2007

Microbial Use Of Recycled Urea Is Dependent On The Level And Frequency Of Degradable Intake Protein Supplementation, T.A. Wickersham, R.C. Cochran, E.E. Wickersham, E.S. Moore, Evan C. Titgemeyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Protein supplementation increases utilization (intake and digestion) of low-quality forage and ultimately animal performance. Despite its effectiveness, protein supplementation is often expensive. One strategy to reduce the cost of supplementation is to supplement less frequently than daily, generally every other day or every third day. By reducing the frequency of supplementation, the cost of delivering the supplement is reduced. Reducing the frequency of supplementation is an effective strategy for reducing cost, and it only minimally impacts animal performance, with less frequent supplementation resulting in slightly greater losses of body condition score and body weight during the winter supplementation period. Urea ...


Supplementation With Undegradable Intake Protein Increases Utilization Of Low-Quality Forage And Microbial Use Of Recycled Urea, T.A. Wickersham, R.C. Cochran, E.E. Wickersham, Evan C. Titgemeyer Jan 2007

Supplementation With Undegradable Intake Protein Increases Utilization Of Low-Quality Forage And Microbial Use Of Recycled Urea, T.A. Wickersham, R.C. Cochran, E.E. Wickersham, Evan C. Titgemeyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Low-quality forage utilization (intake and digestion) is improved by protein supplementation. Typically, the recommendation is to select supplements that are high in degradable intake protein because this fraction of the protein directly addresses the ruminal nitrogen deficiency that exists when low-quality forages are fed. However, the low cost of byproducts (e.g., distiller's grains) that are high in undegradable intake protein makes them an attractive source of supplemental protein even though the response per unit of supplemental protein is less for undegradable protein than for degradable protein. One of the primary barriers to utilizing highly undegradable protein sources as ...