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Cattlemen's Day

2002

Articles 31 - 51 of 51

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Prevalence Of Mycoplasma Bovis In Bovine Pneumonia And Arthritis, T. Yeary, Jerome C. Nietfeld Jan 2002

Prevalence Of Mycoplasma Bovis In Bovine Pneumonia And Arthritis, T. Yeary, Jerome C. Nietfeld

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Samples from cattle with pneumonia and/or arthritis were cultured for Mycoplasma. When requested, the Mycoplasma isolates were further identified to species by polymerase chain reaction or restriction fragment length polymorphism. The records of all cases where mycoplasma testing was performed were examined and other infectious agents known to cause pneumonia or arthritis were recorded. Mycoplasma species were isolated from 85% of the lung samples and 69% of the joint samples. Eighty-four percent of the 81 Mycoplasma isolates that were further identified were M. bovis, which clearly made it the most common pathogenic agent identified in samples from cattle with ...


The Effect Of Aureomycin® In Combination With Bovetec® In A Mineral Mixture On Steers Grazing Native Grass, F.K. Brazle Jan 2002

The Effect Of Aureomycin® In Combination With Bovetec® In A Mineral Mixture On Steers Grazing Native Grass, F.K. Brazle

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Three hundred twelve mixed-breed steers (590 lb) were allotted randomly to eight native grass pastures on April 20. The pastures were grazed until July 13. The steers in four pastures received a basic mineral mix with 800 mg of Bovatec7 per lb. The other four pastures received the basic mineral mixture with Bovatec plus 1.6 lb Aureomycin 50 per 50 lb of mineral. The steers receiving the mineral with Aureomycin had greater mineral consumption (P<0.04). Including Aureomycin in the mineral increased gain by 2%; however, the response was not statistically significant.


Seasonal Forage Quality Of Rangelands Across Kansas, Keith R. Harmoney, Sandra K. Johnson, R. Cochran, E. Vanzant, Jeffrey J. Wilson, D. Yauk, Michael S. Holder, B. Allen, Warren W. Bell, H. Jansonius Jan 2002

Seasonal Forage Quality Of Rangelands Across Kansas, Keith R. Harmoney, Sandra K. Johnson, R. Cochran, E. Vanzant, Jeffrey J. Wilson, D. Yauk, Michael S. Holder, B. Allen, Warren W. Bell, H. Jansonius

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The K-State Research and Extension Forage Task Force surveyed Kansas rangelands during the course of seasonal changes to enable producers and managers to better estimate the feed value of their pasture forage during particular times of the year. Kansas' two distinct rangeland vegetation types, shortgrass and tallgrass prairie, were evaluated. Forage samples were collected monthly from two rangeland sites in each of 10 Kansas counties. Tallgrass vegetation was lowest in acid detergent fiber (ADF) and greatest in crude protein (CP) from May to July, and rapidly increased in ADF and declined in CP the rest of the season. Shortgrass vegetation ...


Steam Based Post-Process Pasteurization Of Beef Salami For Control Of Listeria Monocytogenes, V.S. Gill, H. Thippareddi, Randall K. Phebus, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 2002

Steam Based Post-Process Pasteurization Of Beef Salami For Control Of Listeria Monocytogenes, V.S. Gill, H. Thippareddi, Randall K. Phebus, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We evaluated the destruction of Listeria monocytogenes on surfaces of artificially inoculated, vacuum-packaged beef salami by steam pasteurization (Stork RMA-Protecon Post-process Pasteurizer). Beef salami was inoculated with L. monocytogenes (initial concentrations of 4.36 log10 CFU/cm2 at the end and 4.49 at the middle), then pasteurized at 185, 194, or 203°F for 2 or 4 min. Only about 0.11 log10 CFU/cm2 (detection limit) L. monocytogenes survived after pasteurization at 203°F for 2 and 4 min, for a "kill rate" of over 99.99%. Post-packaging pasteurization reduces the threat of L. monocytogenes on the surfaces ...


Temperature Management To Minimize Ground Beef Aerobic And Lactic Acid Bacteria Growth, R.A. Mancini, Melvin C. Hunt, Donald H. Kropf, K.A. Hachmeister Jan 2002

Temperature Management To Minimize Ground Beef Aerobic And Lactic Acid Bacteria Growth, R.A. Mancini, Melvin C. Hunt, Donald H. Kropf, K.A. Hachmeister

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Increasing storage and display temperature and time of ground beef significantly increased microbial counts but lean level had no effect. Prolonged storage at abusive temperatures (48°F) caused up to 90% unacceptable chubs and aerobic bacteria counts as high as 7.7 log10 CFU/g, which would render chubs unsatisfactory for further processing, packaging and sale. Thus, ground beef chubs should be stored at 32°F. and as briefly as possible to minimize pre- and post-display microbial counts. Maintaining both optimal storage and display temperatures is critical because combining abusive storage and display conditions resulted in the greatest microbial growth ...


The Effect Of Dakota Gold®-Brand Dried Distiller’S Grains With Solubles Of Varying Levels On Sensory And Color Characteristics Of Ribeye Steaks, C.M. Gordon, K.A. Hachmeister, James J. Higgins, A.L. Reicks, James S. Drouillard, Randall K. Phebus, Michael E. Dikeman Jan 2002

The Effect Of Dakota Gold®-Brand Dried Distiller’S Grains With Solubles Of Varying Levels On Sensory And Color Characteristics Of Ribeye Steaks, C.M. Gordon, K.A. Hachmeister, James J. Higgins, A.L. Reicks, James S. Drouillard, Randall K. Phebus, Michael E. Dikeman

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We evaluated the effect of varying levels of Dakota Gold-brand dried distiller's grains with solubles (DDGS) on meat quality characteristics including sensory traits and display color stability. Rib cuts from heifers from a 153-day feeding trial were selected randomly so that each level of DDGS had 10 steaks in a seven-day retail display color study, and 10 steaks that were cooked for evaluation by a trained sensory panel. Color reflectance value L* (lightness) exhibited an interaction (P<0.05) between diet and day, as well as a quadratic effect (P<0.05). Diet had no effect on a* (redness) or b* (yellowness) values, but a* and b* for all treatments decreased with longer display (P<0.05). A trained sensory panel detected small but significant (P<0.05) linear improvements in myofibrillar tenderness and overall tenderness as DDGS increased. The effect on sensory traits or display color stability were too small to warrant the feeding of DDGS to improve these traits.


Effects Of Tallow And Ground Flaxseed On Sensory And Color Characteristics Of Ribeye Steaks, H.J. Labrune, K.A. Hachmeister, Donald H. Kropf, James S. Drouillard, Michael E. Dikeman Jan 2002

Effects Of Tallow And Ground Flaxseed On Sensory And Color Characteristics Of Ribeye Steaks, H.J. Labrune, K.A. Hachmeister, Donald H. Kropf, James S. Drouillard, Michael E. Dikeman

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Forty-eight ribeye steaks from steers fed diets containing steam-flaked corn (SFC), steam-flaked corn with tallow (SFC/Tallow), or steam-flaked corn with rolled flaxseed (Flax) were used to evaluate the effects of dietary fat on sensory traits, retail display color stability, and fatty acid composition. Steaks from Flax-fed steers had increased deposition of α linolenic acid (C18:3n3, an omega-3 fatty acid; P<0.01) and developed a detectable off-flavor (P<0.05) when compared to those of cattle fed SFC and SFC/Tallow. There were no differences in tenderness, juiciness, or flavor intensity (P>0.10) among the three treatments. Steaks from cattle fed SFC retained a desirable color longer than those from cattle fed Flax (P<0.05) which may be attributable to premature lipid oxidation in steaks from cattle fed Flax. This study suggests that altering the fat in the diet may affect flavor and color stability of the meat. Feeding flaxseed can effectively alter composition of carcass tissues to yield beef that is high in omega-3 fatty acids, which may lead to premature lipid oxidation.


Practical Aspects Of Beef Carcass Traceabilityin Commercial Beef Processing Plants Using An Electronic Identification System, J.R. Davis, Michael E. Dikeman Jan 2002

Practical Aspects Of Beef Carcass Traceabilityin Commercial Beef Processing Plants Using An Electronic Identification System, J.R. Davis, Michael E. Dikeman

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The use of an electronic identification (EID) system in slaughter facilities holds great potential as a tool for animal and carcass traceability, if used as part of a comprehensive carcass tracking system. However, the correct association of each carcass with its individual EID tag number may be hindered at several points during the slaughter process. For 2,994 cattle slaughtered in 14 lots and bearing buttontype, full duplex EID ear tags, 113 (3.92%) had non-functional tags, 16 (0.53%) had no tag, and 37 extra head were introduced accidentally into one of our lots. Of the 2,994 carcasses ...


Factors Affecting The Price Paid For Spring-Yearling Bulls, T.T. Marston, L.E. Wankel, Daniel W. Moser Jan 2002

Factors Affecting The Price Paid For Spring-Yearling Bulls, T.T. Marston, L.E. Wankel, Daniel W. Moser

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Many factors are considered when commercial cow/calf producers buy bulls. Breeding system needs and breeder's preference determine which breed of bull will be purchased at a multi-breed sale. Our analysis of prices paid for bulls tested and sold through the Kansas Bull Test Station indicates that bull consigners' reputations and marketing techniques influence the price received for bulls at such an event. Individual performance and genetic potential are other areas of interest to bull buyers. Buying habits and prices indicate that commercial cow/calf operations use different traits, depending on the breed, to enhance their cowherd's production.


Economies Of Scale In Kansas Beef Cow-Calf Production, L. Stryker, Michael R. Langemeier, R. Jones Jan 2002

Economies Of Scale In Kansas Beef Cow-Calf Production, L. Stryker, Michael R. Langemeier, R. Jones

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Cow-calf producers must learn to control those aspects of production that are under their management. Quantity of beef produced and the cost of maintaining the breeding herd from conception to weaning are two examples of variables over which an individual operator has control. Therefore, it is important for managers to know their cost of production and, in turn, the relationship of quantity produced to cost. Our study found that for a 1% increase in quantity of beef produced, total cost increased by only 0.88%, suggesting economies of scale.


A Study Of The Chemical And Microbial Changes In Whole-Plant Corn Silage During Fermentation And Storage: Effects Of Packing Density And Sealing Technique, M.E. Uriarte-Archundia, K.K. Bolsen, B.E. Brent Jan 2002

A Study Of The Chemical And Microbial Changes In Whole-Plant Corn Silage During Fermentation And Storage: Effects Of Packing Density And Sealing Technique, M.E. Uriarte-Archundia, K.K. Bolsen, B.E. Brent

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The objectives of this study with whole-plant corn silage were to determine the effects of forage density after packing, and sealing technique on yeast and mold populations; and to examine the relationship between the microbial and chemical changes in the silages during the fermentation process and storage period. Whole-plant corn was harvested at 80% milkline (36% DM) and ensiled at three densities (D): D1, 23.2; D2, 33.2, and D3, 43.3 lb/ft3. Half of the silos for each density were sealed immediately after filling (S, sealed) and the other half of the silos were sealed 48 hours ...


A Study Of The Chemical And Microbial Changes In Whole-Plant Corn Silage During Exposure To Air: Effects Of A Biological Additive And Sealing Technique, M.E. Uriarte-Archundia, K.K. Bolsen, B.E. Brent Jan 2002

A Study Of The Chemical And Microbial Changes In Whole-Plant Corn Silage During Exposure To Air: Effects Of A Biological Additive And Sealing Technique, M.E. Uriarte-Archundia, K.K. Bolsen, B.E. Brent

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The objectives of this study with whole-plant corn silage were to determine the effects of a biological additive and sealing technique on yeast and mold populations; and to examine the relationship between the microbial and chemical changes in the silages during exposure to air. Whole-plant corn was harvested at 80% milkline (36% DM), and ensiled at a density of 35 lb of fresh matter/ft3. Half of the pre-ensiled forage was treated with a biological additive (A) (Sil-All 4x4, Alltech, Inc.); the other half of the pre-ensiled forage was the untreated control (C). Half of the silos in the A ...


Microbial Flora Of Commercially Produced Vacuum Packaged, Cooked Beef Roast, R.J. Danler, H. Thippareddi, Elizabeth A.E. Boyle, Randall K. Phebus, Daniel Y.C. Fung, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 2002

Microbial Flora Of Commercially Produced Vacuum Packaged, Cooked Beef Roast, R.J. Danler, H. Thippareddi, Elizabeth A.E. Boyle, Randall K. Phebus, Daniel Y.C. Fung, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Commercially produced vacuum packaged, fully cooked, microwaveable beef roasts from four producers were purchased from local retail markets. Salt concentration, pH, water activity (aw), and percent moisture, fat and protein were determined. Samples of both package juice and homogenized beef plus juice were analyzed for the presence of aerobic, anaerobic and lactic acid bacteria and clostridia-type organisms. The cooked beef products had pH values from 5.82 to 6.19, water activity of 0.992 to 0.997, and contained 0.34 to 1.07% salt, 61.89 to 72.39% moisture, 4.29 to 18.21% fat and 15 ...


Dakota Gold®-Brand Dried Distiller’S Grains With Solubles In Finishing Cattle Diets: A Preharvest Strategy Against Acid Resistant Escherichia Coli And Coliforms?, C.M. Gordon, H. Thippareddi, D.L. Lambert, K. Kerr, N. Pike, J.J. Sindt, James J. Higgins, Randall K. Phebus, James S. Drouillard Jan 2002

Dakota Gold®-Brand Dried Distiller’S Grains With Solubles In Finishing Cattle Diets: A Preharvest Strategy Against Acid Resistant Escherichia Coli And Coliforms?, C.M. Gordon, H. Thippareddi, D.L. Lambert, K. Kerr, N. Pike, J.J. Sindt, James J. Higgins, Randall K. Phebus, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Trial 1. Finishing beef heifers (345 head) were used in a 153-day finishing trial to evaluate the effects of feeding six levels of Dakota Gold®-brand dried distiller's grains with solubles (DDGS): 0%, 15%, 30%, 45%, 60%, 75% (dry basis), on the number of acid resistant E. coli and coliforms. Fecal grab samples were taken on day 65 and day 100, 2 and 20 hours after feeding, and were analyzed for acid resistant E. coli and total coliforms, as well as pH and VFA. There was a significant linear increase in fecal pH with increased DDGS at both 2 ...


Impacts Of Food Safety On Beef Demand, T.L. Marsh, N.E. Piggott Jan 2002

Impacts Of Food Safety On Beef Demand, T.L. Marsh, N.E. Piggott

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This study investigates whether food safety incidents involving beef, pork, and poultry, and the accompanying publicity have impacted United States meat demand. Beef demand is modeled as a function of beef prices, competing meat prices, meat expenditures, and food safety. Food safety indices are constructed separately for beef, pork, and poultry. Statistical tests reveal significant effects of food safety incidents on beef demand. The effect of an additional beef food safety incident on beef demand is negative, implying a detrimental impact on beef consumption. Spillover effects of pork and poultry safety incidents are positive and improve beef demand, revealing substitution ...


Effects Of Cooking Beef Muscles From Frozen Or Thawed States On Cooking Traits And Palatability, E. Obuz, Michael E. Dikeman Jan 2002

Effects Of Cooking Beef Muscles From Frozen Or Thawed States On Cooking Traits And Palatability, E. Obuz, Michael E. Dikeman

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We used an electric belt grill to cook steaks from two muscles; outside round (biceps femoris), and loin strip (longissimus lumborum) from both frozen and thawed states. The color values L* and a*, Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), juiciness, flavor, connective tissue amount, and overall tenderness did not differ (P>0.05) between steaks cooked from frozen and thawed states. Thawed steaks cooked faster and had less cooking loss. The biceps femoris had higher WBSF than longissimus and was rated less tender by trained panelists. Color values L*, a*, or b* did not differ (P>0.05) among the muscles. The ...


Effects Of Freezing And Location Within The Beef Longissimus Muscle (Strip Loin Steak) On Tenderness, R.R. Timm, John A. Unruh, Michael E. Dikeman, Melvin C. Hunt, John E. Boyer, James L. Marsden Jan 2002

Effects Of Freezing And Location Within The Beef Longissimus Muscle (Strip Loin Steak) On Tenderness, R.R. Timm, John A. Unruh, Michael E. Dikeman, Melvin C. Hunt, John E. Boyer, James L. Marsden

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Twenty-four USDA Select strip loins (IMPS 180) were aged (32°F) until 14 days postmortem and fabricated into longissimus muscle (strip loin) steaks (1-in. thick). Then, steaks were either cooked or stored at −20°F for an additional 17 days before they were thawed and cooked. Cores and sensory panel samples were removed from the medial, center, and lateral sections of each steak and locational identify maintained. In addition, a random composite of cubes from an entire steak was used for a sensory panel evaluation. Previously frozen steaks had lower Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) values, less cooking loss, and a ...


Mechanical Force Measures On Uncooked Beef Longissimus Muscle Can Predict Tenderness Of Strip Loin Steaks, R.R. Timm, John A. Unruh, Michael E. Dikeman, M.C. Hunt, T.E. Lawrence, John E. Boyer, James L. Marsden Jan 2002

Mechanical Force Measures On Uncooked Beef Longissimus Muscle Can Predict Tenderness Of Strip Loin Steaks, R.R. Timm, John A. Unruh, Michael E. Dikeman, M.C. Hunt, T.E. Lawrence, John E. Boyer, James L. Marsden

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We investigated mechanical force measurements on uncooked longissimus muscle as a means to predict Warner- Bratzler shear force (WBSF) and trained sensory panel tenderness (SPT) of cooked strip loin steaks. Uncooked steaks from 24 USDA Select strip loins (IMPS 180) were evaluated at 2 and 14 days postmortem using plumb bob and needle probe devices attached to an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Cooked steaks aged 14 days were then evaluated for WBSF and SPT. Regression models to predict SPT from needle probe and plumb bob measurements individually taken at 2 days postmortem had R2 of 0.54 and 0.51 ...


Surface Roughening During Slicing Reduces Iridescence, T.E. Lawrence, Melvin C. Hunt, Donald H. Kropf Jan 2002

Surface Roughening During Slicing Reduces Iridescence, T.E. Lawrence, Melvin C. Hunt, Donald H. Kropf

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We evaluated surface roughening during slicing as a way to decrease iridescence of pre-cooked cured beef bottom round, inside round, and eye of round roasts. Using a textured slicing blade surface decreased iridescence intensity and the area of iridescence compared to the control (smooth surface). Iridescence intensity and percentage of iridescent area was greatest in the eye of round, followed by the inside bottom round. Iridescence (both intensity and percentage of area) in sliced meat products can be reduced by using a meat-slicing blade with a textured face.


Effects Of Injection Marination With Various Calcium Sources And Molar Concentrations On Display Color Life, Tenderness, And Microbial Inhibition Of Beef Loin Steaks, T.E. Lawrence, Melvin C. Hunt, Michael E. Dikeman, Curtis L. Kastner, James L. Marsden Jan 2002

Effects Of Injection Marination With Various Calcium Sources And Molar Concentrations On Display Color Life, Tenderness, And Microbial Inhibition Of Beef Loin Steaks, T.E. Lawrence, Melvin C. Hunt, Michael E. Dikeman, Curtis L. Kastner, James L. Marsden

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Beef strip loins were assigned to one of 11 treatments that included injection marination (10% by weight) with three calcium salts at three molar concentrations, a distilled water control, and a non-marinated control. The effects of calcium salt and concentration were tested for retail display color life, tenderness and sensory traits, and microbial growth. Calcium lactate marinated steaks had longer color life and less microbial growth than those treated with calcium chloride or calcium ascorbate. Increasing molar concentration (.1M to .2M to .3M) caused faster color deterioration, and did not significantly improve microbial inhibition. All calcium treatments improved tenderness; however ...


Efficiency Differences In Kansas Beef Cow-Calf Production, L. Stryker, R. Jones, M. Langmeier Jan 2002

Efficiency Differences In Kansas Beef Cow-Calf Production, L. Stryker, R. Jones, M. Langmeier

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

For the beef industry to be economically competitive with other meat industries, it is essential that individual producers strive for the most efficient, highest quality, least cost production possible. A sample of 26 Kansas beef cow-calf enterprises from the Kansas Standardized Performance Analysis database (SPA) was used to measure efficiency differences among producers, as well as factors contributing toward these differences. On average, farms were 86% technical, 69% economic, and 58% overall efficient. Thus, our results suggest that output could be increased by 14% with optimal technology use, and cost could be decreased by 42% if farms were fully economically ...