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Cattlemen's Day

1995

Articles 31 - 40 of 40

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

How The Price Of Different Breeds Of Feeder Cattle Has Changed Over Time, F.K. Brazle, J.R. Mintert, J. Iii Sartwelle, R.P. Jr. Bolze, Ted C. Schroeder Jan 1995

How The Price Of Different Breeds Of Feeder Cattle Has Changed Over Time, F.K. Brazle, J.R. Mintert, J. Iii Sartwelle, R.P. Jr. Bolze, Ted C. Schroeder

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Data on feeder steer characteristics, breeds, and prices were collected in 1986/87 and 1993 at Kansas and Missouri feeder cattle auctions to identify changes in buyers' preferences for various breeds. Results from models of feeder steer price/characteristics indicate that the relative value of many breeds changed over time. Relative to Hereford steers, Angus, Hereford x Angus cross, Continental cross, and low percentage Brahman steers all gained in price from 1986/87 to 1993. Longhorn Cross steers' price declined relative to Hereford steers over the same time period.


Kansas Environmental Regulations, Joseph P. Harner, L. Hess, James P. Murphy Jan 1995

Kansas Environmental Regulations, Joseph P. Harner, L. Hess, James P. Murphy

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) enforces two different regulation s in the state of Kansas. One set of regulation s is from the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and applies to larger operations. The other is a set of Kansas regulation s created by our state legislature for smaller operations. EPA regulations pertain to confined feeding operation s in excess of 1,000 animal units and require an EPA National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. Because an animal unit for the NPDES permit is defined as one beef animal, a feedlot with a capacity of 1 ...


Losses From Top Spoilage In Horizontal Silos, D.L. Holthaus, B.E. Brent, L. Pfaff, K.K. Bolsen, Matthew A. Young Jan 1995

Losses From Top Spoilage In Horizontal Silos, D.L. Holthaus, B.E. Brent, L. Pfaff, K.K. Bolsen, Matthew A. Young

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The top 3 ft of silage from 127 horizontal silos was sampled at three locations across the width of the silo during a 4-year period (1990 through 1993). Ninety-six percent of the silages were either corn or forage sorghum, and only 18 percent of the silos were sealed with polyethylene sheeting . Losses of organic matter (OM) from spoilage were estimated by using ash content as an internal marker. Sealing silos dramatically reduced the estimated spoilage losses in the top 3 ft. All silages had greater estimated spoilage losses in the top 18 inches in 1991 and 1993 than 1990 and ...


Top Spoilage Losses For Corn And Forage Sorghum Silages Stored In Bunker Silos, D.L. Holthaus, B.S. Dalke, L. Pfaff, John E. Boyer, K.K. Bolsen, Matthew A. Young Jan 1995

Top Spoilage Losses For Corn And Forage Sorghum Silages Stored In Bunker Silos, D.L. Holthaus, B.S. Dalke, L. Pfaff, John E. Boyer, K.K. Bolsen, Matthew A. Young

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Corn and forage sorghum silages were stored in small bunker silos for 180 days. Dry matter (DM) and organic matter (OM) losses, fermentation characteristics , in-situ DM digestibility, and temperatures were measured at 10, 20, and 30 inches from the original silage surface. Sealing the exposed surface increased DM and OM recoveries and improved fermentation quality and nutritive value in both crops, regardless of depth. The unsealed corn silages were much hotter within the top 3 ft than sealed silages, indicating aerobic losses. As expected , the unsealed silages from both crops deteriorated severely i n the top 20 inches. Placing a ...


Effect Of Bacterial Inoculants On The Preservation And Nutritive Value Of Whole-Plant Corn Silages, K.K. Bolsen, D.W. Rice, M.A. Hinds, C. Zimmermann, Matthew A. Young Jan 1995

Effect Of Bacterial Inoculants On The Preservation And Nutritive Value Of Whole-Plant Corn Silages, K.K. Bolsen, D.W. Rice, M.A. Hinds, C. Zimmermann, Matthew A. Young

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Inoculated and control corn silages were compare d using pilot-scale silos. Inoculated silages (Pioneer inoculant 117 4 and 1132) had significantly higher lactic to acetic acid ratios, and numerically lower values for DM loss, acetic acid, ethanol, and ammonia-nitrogen than the control silage"”evidence that both inoculants produced a more efficient fermentation . Although the inoculated silage rations had higher DM intakes than the control, nutrient digestibilities were similar for the three silages . These results are consistent with numerous studies that compared untreated and inoculant-treated silages over a wide range of crops and ensiling conditions in our research during the past ...


Agronomic Performance And Silage Quality Traits Of Forage Sorghum Hybrids In 1994, M.S. Mitchem, L. Pfaff, K.K. Bolsen, Matthew A. Young Jan 1995

Agronomic Performance And Silage Quality Traits Of Forage Sorghum Hybrids In 1994, M.S. Mitchem, L. Pfaff, K.K. Bolsen, Matthew A. Young

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The 1994 growing season was characterized by near norm al rainfall and temperatures. Both whole-plant DM and grain yields were excellent for all hybrid s. The middle-season Pioneer 947 hybrid had the highest grain yield. The two dual-purpose hybrids had the highest whole-plant DM yields, and the male sterile (Golden Harvest H-1) and the grain sorghum (DeKalb 42Y) had the lowest. Strong winds in the first week in September caused substantial lodging in three of the four tall middle- and late-season hybrids (DeKalb FS-5 and Golden Harvest H-2 and H-68). Two of the short height, dual purpose hybrids (Northrup King ...


Process Intervention To Assure Sanitation Of Beef Carcasses And Cuts, R.K. Prasai, P.B. Kenney, C.M. García Zepeda, L.E. Mease, L.R. Vogt, B.L. Willard, Donald H. Kropf, Randall K. Phebus, R.E. Campbell, Elizabeth A.E. Boyle Jan 1995

Process Intervention To Assure Sanitation Of Beef Carcasses And Cuts, R.K. Prasai, P.B. Kenney, C.M. García Zepeda, L.E. Mease, L.R. Vogt, B.L. Willard, Donald H. Kropf, Randall K. Phebus, R.E. Campbell, Elizabeth A.E. Boyle

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The meat industry and Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) strive to minimize carcass contamination during slaughter and subsequent processing. Because microbial contamination during slaughter cannot be avoided completely, decontamination methods must be addressed. This overview emphasizes process intervention studies conducted at Kansas State University to determine the most effective intervention points and technologies to control microbiological hazards in meat and meat products. Our research shows that trimming of gross contamination followed by washing is a reasonable approach to minimizing microbial contamination on beef carcasses. We also found that sanitation of subprimal cuts may be just as effective as treating ...


Effects Of Hot-Fat Trimming On Retail Display Color Of Three Beef Muscles, S.R. Stuewe, Donald H. Kropf, Melvin C. Hunt, R.E. Campbell, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 1995

Effects Of Hot-Fat Trimming On Retail Display Color Of Three Beef Muscles, S.R. Stuewe, Donald H. Kropf, Melvin C. Hunt, R.E. Campbell, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Steaks from subprimal cuts from carcass sides that were either hot-fat-trimmed to .25 inch or not hot-f at-trimmed (control) were used to determine trimming effects on retail display color. After 14 days storage in vacuum bags at 30EF, subprimals were cut into 1-inch-thick steaks for evaluation. Specific muscles that were evaluated were the loin strip (longissimus lumborum) , inside round (semimembranosus only), an d the chuck clod (triceps brachii only). The steaks were packaged in polyvinylchloride (PVC) film and displayed. The loin strip steaks from hot-fat-trimmed sides were more discolored (P<.05) than from nontrimmed controls at 0, 3, and 4 days display, but both had acceptable color through 4 days of display. Treatments were not different for inside round steaks (P>.05) ; the deep location was less red (P<.05) than the location closer to the muscle surface. Chuck clod steaks were not affected by trimming (P>.05). The ...


Display Life And Internal Cooked Color Of Ground Beef From Vitamin E-Supplemented Cattle, C.L. Lavelle, Melvin C. Hunt, Donald H. Kropf Jan 1995

Display Life And Internal Cooked Color Of Ground Beef From Vitamin E-Supplemented Cattle, C.L. Lavelle, Melvin C. Hunt, Donald H. Kropf

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Retail display life of ground beef and internal color of patties cooked to four endpoint temperatures (131, 149, 160, and 17 1EF) were determined for ground beef (9% fat) from vitamin E-supplemented (500 and 2000 IU per day) steers. Visual scores indicated that the display time required for the 500 and 2000 vitamin E samples to reach an objectionable reddish-brown/brown color was increased by 12 and 32 hours, respectively, as compared with the 0 vitamin E samples. Patties did not differ in internal cooked color regardless of vitamin E level. Vitamin E was effective in increasing retail display color ...


Factors Affecting Premature Browning In Cooked Ground Beef, Melvin C. Hunt, K.E. Warren, Donald H. Kropf, M.A. Hague, C.L. Waldner, Sally L. Stroda, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 1995

Factors Affecting Premature Browning In Cooked Ground Beef, Melvin C. Hunt, K.E. Warren, Donald H. Kropf, M.A. Hague, C.L. Waldner, Sally L. Stroda, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Some ground beef patties developed an internal, brown cooked color and looked well-done at temperatures as low as 13 1EF, whereas normal patties were re d to pink. The premature brown color was not relate d to percent fat; patty compaction; animal source and maturity; pH (5.5 to 5.8); or concentrations of raw patty heme and nonhemeiron, myoglobin, and total pigment. Because oxidation-reduction potential and total reducing activities were higher (P<.05) and TBA numbers were lower (P<.05) in normal than prematurely brown patties, the brown color is apparently related to greater patty oxidation.