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Cattlemen's Day

1994

Articles 1 - 30 of 50

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Polyvinylchloride-Packaged Loin Strip Steaks From Vacuum-Packaged Beef Strip Loins Decontaminated With Lactic Acid And Stored For Up To 126 Days, L.E. Mease, Donald H. Kropf, R.K. Prasai, P.B. Kenney, L.R. Vogt, Daniel Y. Fung, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 1994

Polyvinylchloride-Packaged Loin Strip Steaks From Vacuum-Packaged Beef Strip Loins Decontaminated With Lactic Acid And Stored For Up To 126 Days, L.E. Mease, Donald H. Kropf, R.K. Prasai, P.B. Kenney, L.R. Vogt, Daniel Y. Fung, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Aerobic plate counts (APCs), presence/ absence of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella spp., and visual color evaluations were used to determine the microbiological and display quality of steaks fabricated from beef strip loins sprayed with lactic acid (1.5% v/v) or water before, after, o r both before and after vacuum storage (14, 28, 56, 84, or 126 days) at either 30E or 36EF compared to nonsprayed or nonstored controls. Lactic acid applied pre- and poststorage (126 days) at 30EF reduced APCs of steak s up to 2 log (99%). L. monocytogenes and Salmonella spp. were absent from all steaks ...


Effect Of Lactic Acid Sprays On Shelf Life And Microbiological Safety Of Beef Subprimals, R.K. Prasai, L.E. Mease, L.R. Vogt, Donald H. Kropf, Daniel Y.C. Fung, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 1994

Effect Of Lactic Acid Sprays On Shelf Life And Microbiological Safety Of Beef Subprimals, R.K. Prasai, L.E. Mease, L.R. Vogt, Donald H. Kropf, Daniel Y.C. Fung, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Beef loins were sprayed with 1.5% lactic acid either before or after vacuum storage, both before and after vacuum storage, and before vacuum packaging followed by a water spray after storage. We stored treated loins at either 30EF or 36EF for up to 126 days in vacuum packages. Nonsprayed or nonstored loins served as controls. Total aerobic plate counts (APCs) and tests for presence/absence of two important foodborne pathogens, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes, were conducted during storage. Acid spraying prior to vacuum packaging was more effective in reducing bacterial contamination than spraying after storage. However, counts were ...


Economies Of Size For Kansas Beef Cow Production, Michael R. Langemeier, Ted C. Schroeder Jan 1994

Economies Of Size For Kansas Beef Cow Production, Michael R. Langemeier, Ted C. Schroeder

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Economies of size measure the impact of increasing the size of operation on average cost of production. Economies o f size exist if average total cost decreases as size increases. Enterprise data from producers enrolled in the Kansas Farm Management Associations in 1992 were used t o empirically estimate economies of size for beef cow enterprises. Results indicate that economies of size exist for beef cow enterprises. Average total cost per head declined as the number of beef cows increased. Substantial variability in costs of production between producers also were documented. Costs of production between producers of a given size ...


The Effect Of Mass Treatment With Micotil® At Arrival On The Health And Performance Of Long-Hauled Calves, F.K. Brazle Jan 1994

The Effect Of Mass Treatment With Micotil® At Arrival On The Health And Performance Of Long-Hauled Calves, F.K. Brazle

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Long-hauled calves (n=170 were either mass-medicated with Micotil® or served as controls. Micotil reduced mortality (1.2 vs 8.1%) and morbidity (59.7 vs 75.5%), but it did not improve ADG.


Relationships Between Lignin Content And Fermentability Of Intact And Chemically Treated Big Bluestem Fiber, R.C. Cochran, G. Towne, Evan C. Titgemeyer, K. C. Olson Jan 1994

Relationships Between Lignin Content And Fermentability Of Intact And Chemically Treated Big Bluestem Fiber, R.C. Cochran, G. Towne, Evan C. Titgemeyer, K. C. Olson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

An accurate assessment of forage quality is required to allow prediction of animal performance. One of the most commonly used methods of forage evaluation is to measure lignin content, with more heavily lignified materials being considered less digestible. Two measures of lignin, acid detergent lignin (ADL) and acetyl bromide lignin (ABL), were assessed with regard to their ability to predict forage digestibility. Big bluestem forage samples were collected from three ungrazed, annually burned pastures at 38, 58, and 97 days postburn. These times were selected to represent a broad range of forage quality. Cell wall material was treated chemically by ...


Effects Of Sorghum Hybrid And Grain Supplementation On The Utilization Of Silage-Based Rations For Growing Cattle, B.S. Dalke, K.K. Bolsen, R.N. Jr. Sonon, D.L. Holthaus, Matthew A. Young Jan 1994

Effects Of Sorghum Hybrid And Grain Supplementation On The Utilization Of Silage-Based Rations For Growing Cattle, B.S. Dalke, K.K. Bolsen, R.N. Jr. Sonon, D.L. Holthaus, Matthew A. Young

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Three whole-plant sorghum silages, each with or without 25% added rolled grain sorghum were fed to six medium-framed, ruminally cannulated steers in a 6 x 6 Latin square design. The grain sorghum silage rations (DeKalb 42Y) had the highest DM, OM, and ADF digestibilities; the late-season forage sorghum silage rations (DeKalb FS 25E), the lowest. Digestibility of NDF tended to be highest for the grain sorghum silage, but starch digestibilities were not affected by sorghum hybrid. Ruminal ammonia, acetate, propionate, butyrate, and total VFA concentrations were highest for the grain sorghum silage rations. Grain supplementation increased DM and OM digestibilities ...


Level Of Urea In High Grain Diets: Finishing Steer Performance, C.T. Milton, Robert T. Brandt Jr. Jan 1994

Level Of Urea In High Grain Diets: Finishing Steer Performance, C.T. Milton, Robert T. Brandt Jr.

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Eighty-eight medium-framed crossbred steers (731 lb) were used to identify the optimal level of urea in finishing diets for growth and carcass traits. Diets contained no urea or .5, 1.0, or 1.5% urea (dry matter basis) and no other supplemental protein. Feed efficiency and gain were improved substantially by the first increment of urea (.5%), with little or no improvement from subsequent urea additions. Pooled across level, urea improved feed efficiency by 5.6% and gain by 8.9%, whereas dry matter intake declined 3.3% compared to controls. Regression analysis indicated that the optimal level of urea ...


Level Of Urea In High Grain Diets: Nutrient Digestibility, Microbial Protein Production, And Rumen Metabolism, C.T. Milton, Robert T. Brandt Jr. Jan 1994

Level Of Urea In High Grain Diets: Nutrient Digestibility, Microbial Protein Production, And Rumen Metabolism, C.T. Milton, Robert T. Brandt Jr.

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Four ruminally and duodenally fistulated steers (1228 lb) were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design to evaluate the effects of dietary urea level on nutrient digestion, microbial protein production, and rumen metabolism of steers fed a rolled corn diet without urea or with .5, 1.0, or 1.5% urea (dry matter basis) and no other supplemental protein. Rumen digestibilities increased 33% for organic matter and 25% for starch with the first increment (.5%) of urea, but little or no improvement occurred with subsequent urea additions. Apparent rumen nitrogen digestibility decreased linearly, whereas total tract and true ...


Source And Level Of Crude Protein For Implanted Finishing Steers, C.T. Milton, Robert T. Brandt Jr. Jan 1994

Source And Level Of Crude Protein For Implanted Finishing Steers, C.T. Milton, Robert T. Brandt Jr.

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

One hundred medium-framed, crossbred steers (738 lb) were used to compare non-protein nitrogen to natural protein supplementation of finishing diets for implanted steers. Diets were formulate d to contain 11.5 or 13.5% crude protein and were supplemented with either urea or soybean meal. A fifth treatment of cottonseed meal supplementation (13.5% dietary crude protein) was added to evaluate differences between natural sources of rumen degradable protein. Steers were implanted with Revalor® and fed for 132 days. During the first 70 days, daily gain and feed efficiency were improved 8.8 and 6.1%, respectively, for steers supplemented ...


D- Vs L-Methionine Utilization By Growing Steers, C.G. Campbell, G. St. Jean, Evan C. Titgemeyer Jan 1994

D- Vs L-Methionine Utilization By Growing Steers, C.G. Campbell, G. St. Jean, Evan C. Titgemeyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Increasing the amino acid supply to the small intestine of growing cattle can increase performance, if specific amino acids are limiting. Although this can be accomplished by feeding rumen undegradable protein, a more economical approach may be supplementing only those amino acids that actually limit performance, but in a form that will bypass the rumen. Methionine (MET) is thought to be a limiting amino acid for growing cattle. DL-MET, a 50 :50 mixture of natural methionine (L-MET) and the unnatural optical isomer (D-MET) is used widely in monogastric rations. Ruminally protected DL-methionine is also available for cattle; however, little information ...


Effect Of Rumen-Escape Protein Level On Feedlot Performance And Carcass Traits Of Implanted Vs Nonimplanted Yearling Steers, Robert T. Brandt Jr., Christopher D. Reinhardt Jan 1994

Effect Of Rumen-Escape Protein Level On Feedlot Performance And Carcass Traits Of Implanted Vs Nonimplanted Yearling Steers, Robert T. Brandt Jr., Christopher D. Reinhardt

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

One hundred eighty yearling steers (743 lb) were blocked by weight; implanted with Synovex® (S), Synovex plus Finaplix® (SF), or not implanted (C); and fed diets containing 11.75% (L), 13.0% (M), or 14.25% (H) crude protein with all supplemental protein above 11.75% being supplied by corn gluten meal and blood meal in a 50:50 ratio (crude protein basis). An addition al protein level fed to S and SF implanted cattle was H for the first 70 days on feed and L thereafter (H-L). Animals were reimplanted on day 70. Steers treated with SF gained faster ...


Payout Characteristics Of Anabolic Agents From Synovex®, Finaplix®, And Revalor® Implants In Finishing Yearling Steers, P.S. Hickman, Robert T. Brandt Jr., D.M. Henricks, J. Ernest Minton, Jeffrey S. Stevenson Jan 1994

Payout Characteristics Of Anabolic Agents From Synovex®, Finaplix®, And Revalor® Implants In Finishing Yearling Steers, P.S. Hickman, Robert T. Brandt Jr., D.M. Henricks, J. Ernest Minton, Jeffrey S. Stevenson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Forty, individually fed, yearling steers (750 lbs) were used to measure payout characteristics of different trenbolone acetate-containing implants and to correlate those characteristics to growth response. Treatments were 1) control, 2) Synovex-S®, 3) Finaplix-S®, 4) Synovex® plus Finaplix, and 5) Revalor®. Steers were fed a 12% crude protein, corn-based, finishing diet for 112 days. Compared to Revalor, which had a fairly constant payout over time, the combination of Synovex plus Finaplix resulted in higher blood levels of estradiol and trenbolone acetate (TBA) up to 56 days, followed by a relatively rapid decline to 112 days. Despite elevated levels of TBA ...


Roughage Levels And Comparison Of Mixed Rations Vs Self-Feeders In Whole Shelled Corn Finishing Programs, C.T. Milton, Robert T. Brandt Jr., S.A. Shuey Jan 1994

Roughage Levels And Comparison Of Mixed Rations Vs Self-Feeders In Whole Shelled Corn Finishing Programs, C.T. Milton, Robert T. Brandt Jr., S.A. Shuey

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two trials were conducted to evaluate roughage levels in whole shelled-corn finishing diets and to compare use of self-feeders to a total mixed ration in a whole corn program. In trial 1, steers were fed whole corn diets alone or with 4 or 8% roughage or a rolled corn diet with 8% roughage. Increasing the roughage level increased dry matter in take, feed required per unit of gain, and carcass weight and finish, and reduced the incidence of liver abscesses. Despite better feed efficiency and lower costs of gain, reducing the dietary roughage level reduced profitability because of lighter slaughter ...


Roughage Level And Corn Processing In Finishing Diets: Subacute Acidosis, S.A. Shuey, Robert T. Brandt Jr., S.M. Gramlich, C.T. Milton Jan 1994

Roughage Level And Corn Processing In Finishing Diets: Subacute Acidosis, S.A. Shuey, Robert T. Brandt Jr., S.M. Gramlich, C.T. Milton

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Roughage level and method of corn processing were evaluated for the propensity to cause subacute acidosis in a controlled acidosis challenge model. Four ruminally fistulated steers were adapted to a high grain diet, randomly allocated within a 4 x 4 Latin square, and fed a corn-based finishing ration at 2% of BW/day (dry basis) in two equal feedings. Chopped alfalfa hay was used as the roughage source and added at 8% of the diet dry matter or not added. Corn was fed either whole (WSC) or dry rolled (DRC). Roughage level and grain processing had no effect on postchallenge ...


Effects Of Alfalfa Form And Level On Subacute Acidosis, B.J. Healy, Robert T. Brandt Jr., S.M. Gramlich Jan 1994

Effects Of Alfalfa Form And Level On Subacute Acidosis, B.J. Healy, Robert T. Brandt Jr., S.M. Gramlich

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Eight ruminally cannulated crossbred steers (1225 lb) were used to investigate the effects of 5 vs 10% alfalfa hay or pellets on rumen characteristics during subacute acidosis. Alfalfa hay was obtained from one source, and alternate bales were either chopped (3- to 4-inch length) or ground and pelleted (3/8-inch pellet). Intake during the recovery period after feed challenges tended (P=.12) to be greater for diets containing 10% alfalfa. Duration of rumen pH below 5.5 was less for diets with chopped vs pelleted (P<.10) or 10 vs 5% (P<.05) alfalfa. Total volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations during the challenge ph ase and for the overall experimental period were increased (P<.05) when steers were fed 5 vs 10% alfalfa diets but were similar during the baseline and recovery periods. The higher pH and lower VFA concentration resulting from feeding 10% alfalfa diets suggest that steers fed a moderate amount of roughage can withstand greater fluctuations in intake without developing acidosis.


The Effect Of Sodium Bicarbonate Level On Rumen Metabolism In Steers With Induced Subacute Acidosis, S.A. Shuey, Robert T. Brandt Jr., S.M. Gramlich Jan 1994

The Effect Of Sodium Bicarbonate Level On Rumen Metabolism In Steers With Induced Subacute Acidosis, S.A. Shuey, Robert T. Brandt Jr., S.M. Gramlich

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Sodium bicarbonate at 1 or 2% of dry matter intake was evaluated as a means of alleviating subacute acidosis, using six fistulated Holstein steers in a controlled acidosis challenge model. Steers were feed challenged by withholding an evening feeding and then feeding 2.5% of BW for two consecutive mornings. Postchallenge rumen pH for control steers (no sodium bicarbonate) was lower (P<.05) than for steers fed either 1% or 2% sodium bicarbonate, which were similar to each other. Hours below pH 5.6 were less (P<.01) postchallenge for steers fed sodium bicarbonate and w ere similar between the 1 and 2% levels. Although sodium bicarbonate reduced ruminal pH hours below 5.6, it did not appear to alter concentrations of volatile fatty acids or lactate in acidotic steers. Sodium bicarbonate appears to be beneficial in managing subacute acidosis in situations where wide intake fluctuations are common or expected.


Supplemental Chromium And Revaccination Effects On Performance And Health Of Newly Weaned Calves, S.A. Lindell, Robert T. Brandt Jr., J. Ernest Minton, Frank Blecha, Gerald L. Stokka, C.T. Milton Jan 1994

Supplemental Chromium And Revaccination Effects On Performance And Health Of Newly Weaned Calves, S.A. Lindell, Robert T. Brandt Jr., J. Ernest Minton, Frank Blecha, Gerald L. Stokka, C.T. Milton

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two trials were conducted to evaluate the effects of chromium (Cr) supplementation (4 mg/hd/day in a yeast form) or no supplementation, with or without revaccination with a modified live viral vaccine at 9 days postweaning o n performance, health, and ability to withstand an IBR challenge infection. In Trial 1, Cr supplementation had no effect on performance of newly weaned calves in a 28-day receiving study, but reduced the incidence of respiratory disease by 37%. Revaccinati on depressed dry matter intake and had no effect on animal health. In trial 2, blood plasma levels of cortisol and ACTH ...


Effects Of Supplemental Trace Minerals And Prevaccination On Stressed Calves, S.A. Lindell, Robert T. Brandt Jr., Gerald L. Stokka, S.M. Gramlich, C.T. Milton Jan 1994

Effects Of Supplemental Trace Minerals And Prevaccination On Stressed Calves, S.A. Lindell, Robert T. Brandt Jr., Gerald L. Stokka, S.M. Gramlich, C.T. Milton

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of high dietary levels of trace minerals on performance and health of stressed calves. In trial 1, 221 Brahman crossbred steers (674 l b, 1/8 to 1/4 Brahman) were used to evaluate the effect of copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) supplementation on performance and immune response. The steers were shipped from northern Texas to the KSU Beef Research Un it with an 18-hour transit time. Receiving diets were formulated to contain 1) NRC-recommended levels of Cu and Zn or 2) 4 times re commended levels. In trial 2, 112 Angus ...


Effect Of Morning Vs Evening Feeding Of Limit-Fed Holsteins During Summer Months, Robert T. Brandt Jr., Christopher D. Reinhardt Jan 1994

Effect Of Morning Vs Evening Feeding Of Limit-Fed Holsteins During Summer Months, Robert T. Brandt Jr., Christopher D. Reinhardt

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Thirty-eight Holstein steers (avg 339 lb) were grouped into four weight blocks, with two pens per block. Within each block, cattle in one pen were fed at 8:00 a.m. and those in the other at 8:00 p.m. All cattle were limit-fed to achieve a programmed rat e of gain of 2.2 lbs/d using NRC net energy equations. The trial lasted from July 13 through September 6, 1993. With the same quantity of feed, cattle fed in the evening gained 18% faster than cattle fed in the morning (P<.02) resulting in better feed efficiency for the evening-fed cattle (P<.06). Average high temperature for the 56-day period was 88F, average low temperature was 69 ÌŠF, average relative humidity was 73%, and average wind speed was 1.8 mph. Feed tended to be consumed within a 3-hour period, regardless of time of feeding. Because the effective ambient temperature frequently rose above the upper critical temperature for cattle (77 ÌŠF), animals needed to expend energy to dissipate excess heat. These results indicate that cattle limit-fed during the summer may utilize metabolizable energy more efficiently if allowed to ferment the bulk of their feed during the cooler hours of the evening.


Implanting Suckling Heifer Calves: Growth And Subsequent Performance, D.D. Simms Jan 1994

Implanting Suckling Heifer Calves: Growth And Subsequent Performance, D.D. Simms

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A total of 361, suckling, heifer calves was used over a 2-year period to assess the effects of implanting with either Ralgro® or Synovex-C® on growth and subsequent performance as replacement females. Both implants increased (P<.01 ) weaning weights over that of controls, with the weight increase being retained by yearlings. Pelvic area also was increased at 1 year of age by both implants, with Synovex-C producing larger (P<.01) pelvic areas than Ralgro. However, just prior to calving, body weight and pelvic area were similar among treatments. Uterine scores, cycling activity prior to breeding, percentage exhibiting estrus, and pregnancy percentage were similar for all treatments. Implanting tended to reduce first-service conception rates. Synovex-C implanted heifers calved later (P<.05) than Ralgro-implanted heifers and, consequently, their calves tended to be lighter at weaning. Levels of calving difficulty we r e similar for all treatments. In summary, implanting suckling heifer calves at 2-4 months of age will increase growth rate, but this research indicates some potential for reduction in reproductive performance.


Effect Of Stage Of Growth And Sampling Procedure On The Trace Mineral Content Of Kansas Native Grass, J.D. Arthington, L.R. Corah, S.D. Utter Jan 1994

Effect Of Stage Of Growth And Sampling Procedure On The Trace Mineral Content Of Kansas Native Grass, J.D. Arthington, L.R. Corah, S.D. Utter

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

To determine the trace mineral content of Kansas native grasses, samples were collected from four locations of tall or intermediate grasses and four locations of short grasses. Copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) levels tended to be lower during dormancy than in the growing season; however, manganese (Mg) and iron (Fe) levels were essentially the same throughout the year. In terms of meeting the dietary requirements of grazing cattle, Cu was adequate in June but marginal in February, whereas Zn was marginal to deficient at both collection times. In addition, the impact of grazing selectivity on the validity of trace mineral ...


The Effect Of Copper Sulfate And Zinc Oxide In A Drench On The Gain And Health Of Newly Arrived Calves, F.K. Brazle, Gerald L. Stokka Jan 1994

The Effect Of Copper Sulfate And Zinc Oxide In A Drench On The Gain And Health Of Newly Arrived Calves, F.K. Brazle, Gerald L. Stokka

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

One hundred and fifty-four, newly arrived, bull calves averaging 295 lb were either drenched with a copper-zinc (Cu-Zn) solution or water at arrival. The Cu-Zn drench did not affect gains during a 56-day trial. Additionally, no differences occurred in morbidity or the number of antibiotic treatments required per animal.


The Effect Of Fourplex® On Gain And Health Of Newly Arrived Calves, F.K. Brazle, Gerald L. Stokka Jan 1994

The Effect Of Fourplex® On Gain And Health Of Newly Arrived Calves, F.K. Brazle, Gerald L. Stokka

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two trials were conducted to evaluate the effects of Fourplex®, a trace mineral supplement, on long-hauled stocker calves. In each trial, Fourplex was added to the ration of lightweight, long-hauled calves in four pens, while calves in another four pens served as controls. Additionally, every other calf that became sick, regardless of feed treatment, was drenched with a solution of Fourplex in Trial I and a Cu, Zn, Mn+Co solution in Trial II. Fourplex in the feed did not improve ADG, reduce morbidity, or reduce the number o f treatments required per sick animal. In Trial II , Fourplex-fed calves ...


The Effect Of Protected Lysine-Methionine On Gain And Health Of Newly Arrived Calves, F.K. Brazle, Gerald L. Stokka Jan 1994

The Effect Of Protected Lysine-Methionine On Gain And Health Of Newly Arrived Calves, F.K. Brazle, Gerald L. Stokka

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Long-hauled calves averaging 293 lb were allotted to groups fed with or without protected lysine-methionine (Smartamine ML®). Protected lysine-methionin e did not improve ADG in the first 28 days but did improve ADG from 29 to 56 days. It also reduced morbidity (16.1 vs 34.2%) from day 29 to 56. Based on this research, the response of long-hauled calves to protected lysine-methionine in the diet appears to occur after they have recovered from the stress of shipment.


The Effect Of Feeding Different Levels Of Aureomycin® In A Mineral Mixture To Stocker Cattle Grazing Native Grass, F.K. Brazle Jan 1994

The Effect Of Feeding Different Levels Of Aureomycin® In A Mineral Mixture To Stocker Cattle Grazing Native Grass, F.K. Brazle

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two hundred and forty-three mixed breed steers were allotted to four treatments with two pastures per treatment. Treatments consisted of a free-choice mineral supplement alone or with Aureomycin® added to provide 150, 300, or 450 mg/hd/day. Gain was similar for all four treatments. The percentage of cattle with eye problems was reduced in pastures where 150 and 450 mg of Aureomycin were consumed daily; however, the incidence in the 300 mg/hd/day group was as high as in the control group.


Effect Of Lasalocid And Length Of Morning Grazing On Weight And Shrink Of Steers Grazing Bromegrass Pastures, K.P. Coffey, F.K. Brazle, Joseph L. Moyer Jan 1994

Effect Of Lasalocid And Length Of Morning Grazing On Weight And Shrink Of Steers Grazing Bromegrass Pastures, K.P. Coffey, F.K. Brazle, Joseph L. Moyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A total of 72 mixed breed steer s from two sources was used in an experiment to determine the effect of lasalocid and length of morning grazing prior to weighing on weight and shrink of steers grazing smooth bromegrass pastures. Steers were divided into eight groups and weighed at either 6, 7, 8, or 9 a.m. on 4 separate days. Half of the steers received a control mineral mixture and half received a mineral mixture containing lasalocid. Weights of purchased steers having an excitable disposition were not affected (P>.10) by length of morning grazing prior to weighing. However ...


Commercial Cattle Producers: Bull Selection Criteria, D.D. Simms, J.M. Geske, R.P. Bolze Jan 1994

Commercial Cattle Producers: Bull Selection Criteria, D.D. Simms, J.M. Geske, R.P. Bolze

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A survey of 312 commercial cattle producers was conducted to determine the relative importance of selection criteria used in buying bulls. Calving ease was a major consideration of a high percentage of producers, and individual performance was being emphasized more than expected progeny differences (EPDs). Only 23% of the producers included EPDs in their first three selection criteria. Visual appraisal focused on structural soundness, length, and muscling.


Efficacy Of Using Parasitic Wasps To Control Stable Flies In Kansas Feedlots, G.L. Greene, J.E. Cilek Jan 1994

Efficacy Of Using Parasitic Wasps To Control Stable Flies In Kansas Feedlots, G.L. Greene, J.E. Cilek

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Release of parasitic wasps has resulted in stable fly reductions averaging 28, 42 and 38% for 1991, 1992, and 1993, respectively, with considerable variation from feedlot to feedlot. Costs for parasites plus sampling averaged $.23, $.32 and $.26 per animal during 1991, 1992, and 1993, respectively. Because stable flies are estimated to cause losses of $5.00 to $30.00 per animal, these costs are very reasonable.


In Vitro Dry Matter Digestibility Of Selected Forage Sorghum Silages As Influenced By Plant Parts, R.N. Jr. Sonon, K.K. Bolsen, B.E. Brent, L.H. Harbers, John E. Boyer Jan 1994

In Vitro Dry Matter Digestibility Of Selected Forage Sorghum Silages As Influenced By Plant Parts, R.N. Jr. Sonon, K.K. Bolsen, B.E. Brent, L.H. Harbers, John E. Boyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Eleven forage sorghum cultivars and one grain sorghum hybrid were used to determine the effect of individual plant parts on in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) of sorghum silage. IVDMD was highest for the head and lowest for the leaf sheath. When head and leaf blade parts were added to whole-plant material, IVDMD increased. When leaf sheath and stalk parts were added, IVDMD decreased, with the greatest decrease for leaf sheath. These results are consistent with an earlier study in our laboratory.


Effect Of Grain Content On The Nutritive Value Of Whole-Plant Corn Silage, R.N. Jr. Sonon, B.S. Dalke, D.L. Holthaus, L. Pfaff, K.K. Bolsen, Matthew A. Young Jan 1994

Effect Of Grain Content On The Nutritive Value Of Whole-Plant Corn Silage, R.N. Jr. Sonon, B.S. Dalke, D.L. Holthaus, L. Pfaff, K.K. Bolsen, Matthew A. Young

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This experiment was conducted to determine the effect of grain content on the nutritive value of corn silage. Whole-plant silage dry matter (DM) increased, whereas neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) contents decreased as the level of grain increased from 0 to 65% in the reconstituted, whole-plant, corn silages. Using sheep as a model, voluntary DM intake and DM and organic matter (OM) digestibility increased, but crude protein (CP) and ADF digestibilities decreased linearly as grain content increased from 0 to 52.5%. Our results indicate that the optimum level of grain in whole-plant corn silage to ...