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Cattlemen's Day

1985

Articles 1 - 29 of 29

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Urea And Limestone Additions To Forage Sorghum Silage, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, D. Axe, R. Smith Jan 1985

Urea And Limestone Additions To Forage Sorghum Silage, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, D. Axe, R. Smith

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Adding urea or limestone to forage sorghum silage increased lactic and acetic acids compared with untreated silage. Urea also elevated the ensiling temperature and increased the DM loss in the silo. Although calves fed the three silages had similar performance, those fed the urea-treated silage tended to have the highest consumption but poorest feed conversion. There were no apparent improvements in silage conservation or feeding value from either urea or limestone.


Effect Of Prepartum Protein Level On Calf Birth Weight, Calving Difficulty, And Reproductive Parameters Of First Calf Heifers And Mature Beef Cows, R.P. Bolze, L.R. Corah, G.M. Fink, L. Hoover Jan 1985

Effect Of Prepartum Protein Level On Calf Birth Weight, Calving Difficulty, And Reproductive Parameters Of First Calf Heifers And Mature Beef Cows, R.P. Bolze, L.R. Corah, G.M. Fink, L. Hoover

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two trials were conducted to determine if precalving protein intake would influence calf birth weight and calving difficulty. In Trial 1 (1983), 38 spring-calving Simmental heifers and 49 cows were allotted to three, 112 day isocaloric prepartum nutritional treatments: 75 (low), 100 (control) or 150 (high) percent of daily crude protein requirements (1976 NRC) for heifers or cows in the last trimester of pregnancy. In Trial 2 (1984), 22 heifers and 51 cows were allotted to control and high protein treatments only. After calving, cows were fed to meet NRC requirements. In Trial 1, the low protein level decreased prepartum ...


Range Research Highlights, E.F. Smith Jan 1985

Range Research Highlights, E.F. Smith

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A 1135 acre tract of native bluestem pasture 5 miles northeast of Manhattan was acquired by the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station in 1946 for range research. Professor A.G. Picket was in charge of the beef cattle research at that time. Professor Kling Anderson of the Department of Agronomy cooperated with the Department of Animal Husbandry in collecting grazing research data. Professor Clenton Owensby, presently assisted by Mr. Gene Towne, took over Dr. Anderson's responsibilities after his retirement. Mr. Jim Whitney is responsible for supervising work at the unit. Many students, staff, faculty, and producers have aided in many ...


Drought-Stressed, Irrigated, And Additive-Treated Corn Silages For Growing Cattle, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, R. Smith, J. Hoover, D. Axe Jan 1985

Drought-Stressed, Irrigated, And Additive-Treated Corn Silages For Growing Cattle, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, R. Smith, J. Hoover, D. Axe

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Cattle fed drought-stressed corn silage gained about 10% slower but were just as efficient as cattle fed irrigated corn silage. Because the irrigated corn out yielded the drought corn (17.4 VS. 8.2 tons per acre), the irrigated silage gave a much higher cattle gain per acre (1928 VS. 940 1b). Silo Guard II®-treated silage had an advantage in DM recovery and feed conversion over its control and produced 4.6 more pounds of cattle gain per ton of crop ensiled. Cattle fed H/M Inoculant®- treated silage gained significantly faster than cattle fed the control, however, the ...


High Moisture Corn Ensiled With Urea, J. Heidker, K. Bolsen, M. Hinds, H. Ilg, B. Janicki, B. Young Jan 1985

High Moisture Corn Ensiled With Urea, J. Heidker, K. Bolsen, M. Hinds, H. Ilg, B. Janicki, B. Young

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

High moisture corn harvested at 18 and 26% moisture, rolled, treated with 0, .75, 1.5, or 2.25% urea (DM basis), and ensiled was evaluated for fermentation rate, chemical composition, and aerobic stability. Adding urea to 26% moisture corn increased the rate and extent of fermentation as measured by lactic, acetic, and total acid concentrations. Only a very limited fermentation occurred in the 18% moisture corn. No statistically significant differences were noted in DM loss or aerobic stability among the eight corn treatments.


Effects Of Delayed Filling And H/M Inoculant® On Preservation And Quality Of Corn Silage, K. Bolsen, M. Hinds, H. Ilg, J. Hoover Jan 1985

Effects Of Delayed Filling And H/M Inoculant® On Preservation And Quality Of Corn Silage, K. Bolsen, M. Hinds, H. Ilg, J. Hoover

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Eight whole-plant corn silages were evaluated using laboratory silos. Treatments were: 1) control (no additive); 2) H/M Inoculant applied to the fresh crop at the forage harvester (H/M-field); and 3) H/M Inoculant applied to the fresh crop at the time of ensiling (H/M-silo). The control and H/M-field treatments were ensiled at 0, 4.5, and 12 hours post-harvest with the fresh crop remaining in the forage wagons until ensiled. The H/M-silo treatment had the inoculant applied immediately prior to ensiling at 4.5 and 12 hours post-harvest. All eight corn silages were well preserved ...


Sodium Bicarbonate And Sodium Bentonite Supplements For Cattle Fed Corn Or Sorghum Silages, D. Axe, K. Bolsen, K. Jacques, D. Harmon Jan 1985

Sodium Bicarbonate And Sodium Bentonite Supplements For Cattle Fed Corn Or Sorghum Silages, D. Axe, K. Bolsen, K. Jacques, D. Harmon

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Supplementing forage sorghum silage rations with sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3 ) improved performance of growing cattle over the control supplement. However, neither NaHCO 3 nor sodium bentonite supplementation to corn silage rations improved cattle performance.


The Manhattan Weather In 1983 And 1984, L. Dean Bark Jan 1985

The Manhattan Weather In 1983 And 1984, L. Dean Bark

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The charts of the daily weather drawn by the KSU computer indicate what occurred in the past two years. The three smooth curves in each diagram represent the average conditions at Manhattan based on 70 years of records from the files of the Agricultural Experiment Stations Weather Data Library. The top two curves show the average maximum and minimum temperatures occurring throughout the year. They reach a low point in mid-January and climb to a peak in mid-July. The bottom smooth curve indicates the average accumulative precipitation during the year. Starting at zero on January 1, it increase during the ...


Effects Of Ralgro® Implants From Birth To Slaughter On Carcass And Meat Traits Of Young Bulls, D.G. Gray, John A. Unruh, Michael E. Dikeman Jan 1985

Effects Of Ralgro® Implants From Birth To Slaughter On Carcass And Meat Traits Of Young Bulls, D.G. Gray, John A. Unruh, Michael E. Dikeman

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Implanting young bulls with Ralgro® from birth to slaughter maintained performance similar to nonimplanted bulls, increased quality grade and carcass fatness, delayed carcass masculinity development, decreased hide weight and thickness, and improved some meat palatability traits. Our results indicate that implanting young bulls with Ralgro® from birth to slaughter improves the traits cited most often by beef packers as reasons for discriminating against young bulls for meat production.


Mineral, Rumensin®, And Chlortetracycline Supplementation For Steers On Native Bluestem Pasture, E.F. Smith, Jack G. Riley, R.R. Schalles, Ronald W. Graber, Clenton E. Owensby Jan 1985

Mineral, Rumensin®, And Chlortetracycline Supplementation For Steers On Native Bluestem Pasture, E.F. Smith, Jack G. Riley, R.R. Schalles, Ronald W. Graber, Clenton E. Owensby

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Eighty steers, primarily of British breeding, were allotted to one of four treatments and maintained on native bluestem pastures from January 11, 1984 to October 2, 1984. Steers received either chlortetracycline or Rumensin®, with and without mineral supplementation.


Effect Of Treating Tall Fescue Pasture With Mefluidide On Performance Of Grazing Steers, Joseph L. Moyer, Lyle W. Lomas Jan 1985

Effect Of Treating Tall Fescue Pasture With Mefluidide On Performance Of Grazing Steers, Joseph L. Moyer, Lyle W. Lomas

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Mefluidide (Embark® ) delays maturity and suppresses seed head formation in grasses. Mefluidide treatment increased the crude protein content of fescue pasture and improved daily gain of grazing steers by 14.3% (.21 lb per head daily).


The Effects Of Levamisole, Receiving Diets, And Pre And Post Transit Potassium On Fain And Health Of Stressed Calves, F.K. Brazle, Frank Blecha, J.B. Mclaren, Jack G. Riley Jan 1985

The Effects Of Levamisole, Receiving Diets, And Pre And Post Transit Potassium On Fain And Health Of Stressed Calves, F.K. Brazle, Frank Blecha, J.B. Mclaren, Jack G. Riley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We purchased 264 calves (125 bulls and 139 steers) in Tennessee and transported them to Kansas to evaluate the effects of levamisole injections and potassium supplementation, before and after transit, and feedlot receiving rations on performance and health of stressed calves. The calves were held for 48 to 96 hours in the order-buyer barn, fed either a 1.1% or 1.5% potassium (K) ration, transported for 24 hours, and fed either a 40% concentrate or hay-plus protein-supplement receiving diet fortified with either 1.1 or 1.7% K for 28 days. They were met in Kansas with 16 hr ...


Comparison Of 36 Mg And 72 Mg Ralgro® For Suckling Steer Calves, D.D. Simms, R. Bolze Jan 1985

Comparison Of 36 Mg And 72 Mg Ralgro® For Suckling Steer Calves, D.D. Simms, R. Bolze

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In order to evaluate whether a 72 mg Ralgro® dosage would improve growth response over 36 mg, 260 suckling steer calves on tow Kansas ranches were assigned to five implant treatments. In trial 1, 72 mg Ralgro® increased gain more than 36 mg Ralgro®. In trial 2, all implant treatments gave only a slight increase in growth rate over controls. Thus, the results are inconclusive and warrant more research before an accurate evaluation of 72 mg Ralgro® for suckling steer calves can be made.


Effect Of Fenbendazole On Cow-Calf Performance And Fecal Egg Counts, Gerry L. Kuhl, R. Ridley, E. Francis, L. Riat Jan 1985

Effect Of Fenbendazole On Cow-Calf Performance And Fecal Egg Counts, Gerry L. Kuhl, R. Ridley, E. Francis, L. Riat

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A field trial was conducted with 80 cow-calf pairs to evaluate the effect of deworming both cows and calves with fenbendazole, on cattle performance and internal parasite burden. Midseason and weaning weights of calves in the fenbendazole-treated group averaged 22.4 and 33.5 lb heavier (P<.04), respectively, than controls. Cow and calf fecal egg counts were low throughout the grazing season and were not materially affected by treatment.


Stocking Rate And Supplementation Of Steers Grazing Bluestem Pasture In Early Summer, E.F. Smith, Jack G. Riley, Clenton E. Owensby, R.R. Schalles, Ronald W. Graber Jan 1985

Stocking Rate And Supplementation Of Steers Grazing Bluestem Pasture In Early Summer, E.F. Smith, Jack G. Riley, Clenton E. Owensby, R.R. Schalles, Ronald W. Graber

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Native bluestem pastures were grazed from May 8 to July 18, 1984 by steers with an average beginning weight of 553 lb, at stocking rates of 1.7, 1.5, and 1.25 acres per steer. Gains per acre were higher (P<.01) with increased stocking rate (97, 111, 132 lb/acre). Daily gains were similar for the three stocking rates (2.34, 2.35, 2.36 lb/day). Daily supplementation with about 1.5 lb sorghum grain plus Rumensin® per head significantly increased gains.


Estimating Frame Score From Hip Height And Age, R.R. Schalles Jan 1985

Estimating Frame Score From Hip Height And Age, R.R. Schalles

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Frame score is a convenient way of describing the skeletal size of cattle. With adequate height growth curves most animals should maintain the same frame score throughout their life, while their actual height increases with age. Environmental factors can alter the normal skeletal growth rate. Nutrition level is a major factor. Cattle fed less than adequate nutrition will growth slower than the tables indicate, while cattle fed extremely high levels will growth faster. Large framed cattle grow faster and for a longer time than small framed cattle. Bulls grow faster than heifers. The accompanying tables and equations are currently the ...


Effect Of Sex Status And Breed-Type On Performance Of Highly Stressed Calves, F.K. Brazle, Frank Blecha, Jack G. Riley, J.B. Mclaren Jan 1985

Effect Of Sex Status And Breed-Type On Performance Of Highly Stressed Calves, F.K. Brazle, Frank Blecha, Jack G. Riley, J.B. Mclaren

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Bull and steer calves of mixed breed type were shipped from Newport, Tennessee to Manhattan, Kansas. Bull calves were castrated on arrival at Manhattan. Calves were classified into four breed-types as follows: (1) black, polled, medium-frame, number one muscling; (2) white-faced, feather-necked, medium-frame, number one muscling; (3) black or red with white face, medium frame, number one muscling; and (4) large-frame, mixed-color calves. The calves were in transit for 24 hours. Calves purchased and transported as steers outgained those purchased as bulls and castrated upon feedlot arrival by 26 lbs during the receiving phase and by 13 lbs on pasture ...


Implant Comparisons For Grazing Yearling Steers, S. Laudert, L. Corah, R. Nelson, C. Sauerwein Jan 1985

Implant Comparisons For Grazing Yearling Steers, S. Laudert, L. Corah, R. Nelson, C. Sauerwein

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Three field trials were conducted with grazing yearling steers to compare Compudose® and Ralgro® implants. Compudose® and Ralgro® implants. Compudose®-implanted steers gained faster (P<.05) than controls. Ralgro® improved daily gain by 3.8%. No significant difference was found between implants.


Factors Affecting Conception Rates In Heifers And Cows Synchronized With Snyncro-Mate-B®, J.T. Brink, C.D. Middleton, G.H. Kiracofe Jan 1985

Factors Affecting Conception Rates In Heifers And Cows Synchronized With Snyncro-Mate-B®, J.T. Brink, C.D. Middleton, G.H. Kiracofe

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In five trials during 1983 and 1984, 238 cows and 54 heifers were synchronized with Syncro-Mate-B® and artificially inseminated 48 hours after implant removal. The conception rate was 42.5% in cows that were cycling and 19.8% in cows that were not cycling before Syncro-Mate-B® treatment. Heifers started on the Syncro-Mate-B® treatment before day 11 of the estrous cycle had a higher conception rate (64.3%) than heifers started after day 11 (38.5%). Conception rates among the trials varied from 19.8 to 64.3%.


A Comparison Of Estrus Synchronization With Syncro-Mate-B® To Natural Service, C. Middleton, T. Brink, G. Kiracofe, J. Brethour, R. Negus Jan 1985

A Comparison Of Estrus Synchronization With Syncro-Mate-B® To Natural Service, C. Middleton, T. Brink, G. Kiracofe, J. Brethour, R. Negus

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Conception rates and subsequent calving dates were compared between cows synchronized with Syncro-Mate-B® and inseminated by appointment and nonsynchronized cows bred by natural service. Average conception date was seven days earlier in the synchronized cows.


Effect Of Vitamin Supplementation Of Receiving Diets On The Performance Of Stressed Beef Calves, B. Lee, R. Stuart, K. Perryman, K. Ridenour Jan 1985

Effect Of Vitamin Supplementation Of Receiving Diets On The Performance Of Stressed Beef Calves, B. Lee, R. Stuart, K. Perryman, K. Ridenour

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Ration formulation for stressed beef calves needs careful consideration, since low feed intakes, rumen dysfunction, and various other health and management problems may influence nutrient intakes and requirements. Supplementation with Vitamin E and B-complex vitamins in starting and receiving diets appears to improve animal performance and health.


Effects Of Ralgro® Implants From Birth To Slaughter On Performance, Masculinity, And Behavior Of Young Bulls, D.G. Gray, John A. Unruh, Michael E. Dikeman Jan 1985

Effects Of Ralgro® Implants From Birth To Slaughter On Performance, Masculinity, And Behavior Of Young Bulls, D.G. Gray, John A. Unruh, Michael E. Dikeman

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Implanting bulls with Ralgro® from birth to slaughter resulted in performance similar to that of nonimplanted bulls. However, implanted bulls were less masculine, had smaller scrotal circumference up to 16 months of age, had lower serum testosterone levels up to 13 months of age, and were less aggressive from 12 to 14 months of age compared to nonimplanted bulls.


Action Of Decoquinate In Altering Feed Efficiency Of Ruminants, D.L. Harmon Jan 1985

Action Of Decoquinate In Altering Feed Efficiency Of Ruminants, D.L. Harmon

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The effects of adding decoquinate (Deccox®) to the diet at 0, 0.5, or 5 mg per kg body weight were evaluated with diets of 30 and 80% concentrate. Decoquinate did not influence rumen or plasma metabolites, diet digestibility, or volatile fatty acid production. No metabolic effects were seen that would suggest a role for decoquinate in altering rumen fermentation and feed efficiency of ruminants.


Effect Of Water Temperature On Cattle Performance, P. Murphy, Ronald V. Pope, David A. Nichols, Jack G. Riley Jan 1985

Effect Of Water Temperature On Cattle Performance, P. Murphy, Ronald V. Pope, David A. Nichols, Jack G. Riley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

When average outside air temperature was about 40 F, water temperatures of 40, 60, Of' 80 F had little effect on water intakes of yearling steers and heifers. In addition, there were no significant differences in average daily feed or efficiency. No electrical energy was required to maintain water at 40 F, and it took about twice as much electricity to maintain water at 80 F instead of 60 F.


Whole-Plant Forage, Grain, Or Nonheading Sorghum Silages For Growing Cattle, R. Smith, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, J. Hoover, J. Dickerson Jan 1985

Whole-Plant Forage, Grain, Or Nonheading Sorghum Silages For Growing Cattle, R. Smith, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, J. Hoover, J. Dickerson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Three sorghum hybrid types were used to make six silages in the fall of 1983. Eight silage rations were compared using 160 steer calves in an 84-day growing trial. Using forage sorghum silage as a base (100), grain sorghum silage had a feeding value of 133, and nonheading sorghum silage 89, when evaluated for comparative rates and efficiencies of gain. Silages from concrete stave silos produced faster and more efficient steer gains than silages from Silopress® bags. Rolling the grain sorghum silages at feeding time to break 95% of the grain significantly improved steer performance. The feeding value of corn ...


Effects Of Hybrid Maturity And Growth Stage On Yield And Composition Of Forage And Grain Sorghums When Harvested As Silage, J. Dickerson, R. Smith, K. Bolsen, T. Walter Jan 1985

Effects Of Hybrid Maturity And Growth Stage On Yield And Composition Of Forage And Grain Sorghums When Harvested As Silage, J. Dickerson, R. Smith, K. Bolsen, T. Walter

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Thirteen sorghum hybrids chosen to represent a range of sorghum types were evaluated in two separate trials. Each was harvested at three stages of grain development: milk to early-dough, late-dough, and hard-grain. Among the forage sorghums, there was a 26-day range in days to half bloom from early to late maturing varieties. Harvest date did not affect crude protein content. However, whole-plant DM yield was significantly lower at the last harvest for the three latest maturing varieties. Grain yield increased over time in the early and intermediate hybrids. Lodging increased significantly over time for all varieties except DeKalb FS-25E. Among ...


Vacuum-Packaged Ground Beef: The Influence Of Color And Educational Materials On Consumer Acceptance, N.M. Lynch, Donald H. Kropf, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 1985

Vacuum-Packaged Ground Beef: The Influence Of Color And Educational Materials On Consumer Acceptance, N.M. Lynch, Donald H. Kropf, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Questionnaires were completed by 1750 Kansas grocery shoppers in selected Dillon's supermarkets to determine how product color and educational materials affected their purchase intent of vacuum-packaged ground beef. Half the consumers received educational materials (informed consumers). Informed consumers were more likely (P<.0001) to indicate a positive purchase intent for vacuum-packaged ground beef than uninformed consumers. Informed consumers were as likely to purchase the purple-red, vacuum-packaged product as the bright cherry-red product to which they are accustomed. Product color was important in their product purchase decision. Vacuum-packaged ground beef should compete favorably with the conventionally packaged product, if educational materials are provided to explain the color differences.


Vacuum-Packaged Versus Conventionally Packaged Ground Beef: The Influence Of Packaging On Consumer Acceptance And Flavor Characteristics, N.M. Lynch, J.F. Caul, Donald H. Kropf, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 1985

Vacuum-Packaged Versus Conventionally Packaged Ground Beef: The Influence Of Packaging On Consumer Acceptance And Flavor Characteristics, N.M. Lynch, J.F. Caul, Donald H. Kropf, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Vacuum-packaged ground beef was compared to a conventionally packaged (polyvinyl chloride) product to determine consumer flavor and aroma preferences. In addition, flavor characteristics were described and quantified by a trained panel. Consumer panels slightly preferred the cooked beef flavor of the conventionally packaged product and the raw aroma of the vacuum-packaged product. Conventionally packaged samples displayed for 3 days and then cooked were slightly less beefy, less fresh, more stale, slightly less bloody/serumy, slightly less sour, and had less of a metallic mouth feel than vacuum-packaged samples stored 12 days and cooked. Throughout display, flavor of the vacuum-packaged samples ...


New Developments In Feeding Wheat To Cattle, J. Brethour, B. Lee, Jack G. Riley Jan 1985

New Developments In Feeding Wheat To Cattle, J. Brethour, B. Lee, Jack G. Riley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

At least for the varieties we studied, hard red winter wheat was superior to soft red winter wheat in beef cattle rations. That contradicts the perception that feed wheats should be soft. The net energy values of Larned hard wheat and Hart soft wheat were 102% and 99% that of corn, respectively. Adding Rumensin® to wheat rations improved performance, probably by reducing acidosis instead of increasing ration net energy value. There was a positive associative effect when wheat and milo were fed together but not when wheat and corn or corn and milo were combined. Steer performance was improved by ...