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Cattlemen's Day

1980

Articles 1 - 25 of 25

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Ensila Plus, Sila-Lator, And Silo-Guard For Alfalfa Silage, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg Jan 1980

Ensila Plus, Sila-Lator, And Silo-Guard For Alfalfa Silage, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Four alfalfa silages (34 to 37% DM) were made May 30 and 31, 1979, as follows: 1) no additive (control), 2) 3 ounces of Ensila Plus per ton, 3) 1.0 lb of Si1a-1ator per ton, and 4) 1.5 1b of Silo-Guard per ton. Silos were opened after 51 days and each was fed to 41 bred, yearling heifers (one pen of 20 and one pen of 21) during a 26-day trial (July 21 to August 16, 1979). All heifers also received 2.0 1bs daily of a grain mix that contained 200 mg of Rumensin for one pen ...


Effect Of Early Weaning On Subsequent Reproduction And Calf Production By Replacement Heifers, W.D. Busby, M. Mckee, L.R. Corah Jan 1980

Effect Of Early Weaning On Subsequent Reproduction And Calf Production By Replacement Heifers, W.D. Busby, M. Mckee, L.R. Corah

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Analysis of breeding records for 128 percentage Simmental females either weaned early (average age 63 days) or conventionally (average age 194 days) showed no statistically significant difference between early-weaned and nursed heifer calves for subsequent conception rate, calving date, ease of calving, calf birth weight, or 205-day adjusted calf weaning weight.


Effect Of Various Levels Of Ralgro On Reproductive Performance Of Yearling Heifers, L. Corah, L.R. Sprott, G. Francis, G. Kiracofe Jan 1980

Effect Of Various Levels Of Ralgro On Reproductive Performance Of Yearling Heifers, L. Corah, L.R. Sprott, G. Francis, G. Kiracofe

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Implanting heifers at weaning time with 12, 24, or 36 mg of Ralgro did not affect reproductive performance of the heifers when bred as yearlings.


Rumensin And Drylot Vs. Pasture Systems For Early-Weaned Calves, W.D. Busby, L.R. Corah, M. Mckee, G. Fink, Ronald V. Pope Jan 1980

Rumensin And Drylot Vs. Pasture Systems For Early-Weaned Calves, W.D. Busby, L.R. Corah, M. Mckee, G. Fink, Ronald V. Pope

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Seventy-six Polled Hereford and percentage Simmental calves were used to evaluate Rumensin and drylot vs. pasture systems by average daily gain of early-weaned (54 day old) calves. Rumensin was fed at 10 g/ton of feed for 28 days and 20 g/ton thereafter. The starter and standard creep rations were self-fed to both the drylot and pasture groups. Drylot calves outgained calves on pearl millet pasture 196 lbs to 140 lbs during the 76-day pasture trial. Rumensin decreased fecal samples containing coccidial oocytes and improved total gain 5.5% and feed efficiency 4.8%.


Performance And Forage Intake Of Range Cows As Affected By Mineral Supplement And Delaying Winter Supplemental Feed, R.J. Pruitt, H.A. Peischel, E.F. Smith, R.R. Schalles, Clenton E. Owensby Jan 1980

Performance And Forage Intake Of Range Cows As Affected By Mineral Supplement And Delaying Winter Supplemental Feed, R.J. Pruitt, H.A. Peischel, E.F. Smith, R.R. Schalles, Clenton E. Owensby

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Polled Hereford cows on native Flint Hills pasture not supplemented until February lost more weight from November to February and were in poorer condition during the winter and early spring than cows supplemented beginning in November. But birth weights, weaning weights, conception percentages, and calving intervals were similar for both groups. Balancing for phosphorus, potassium, and copper deficiencies in the forage did not improve cow or calf performance. Forage intake ranged from 1.70% of fall body weight when dormant winter grass was low in protein and digestibility to 3.45% when spring grass was higher in protein and more ...


Silo-Guard For Corn Silage, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg Jan 1980

Silo-Guard For Corn Silage, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two corn silages (34 to 36% DM) were made August 4 and 5, 1976; one was ensiled without additive (control), the other with Silo-Guard added at 1.5 lbs. per ton of fresh crop. Silos were opened after 68 days, and each silage was full-fed to 15 yearling steers (3 pens of 5 steers) during a 91-day trial (October 12, 1976, to January 11, 1977). Complete-mixed rations contained 84% silage and 16% soybean meal supplement on a DM basis.


Grain Dust For Finishing Cattle, D. Axe, H. Ilg, K. Bolsen, Keith C. Behnke Jan 1980

Grain Dust For Finishing Cattle, D. Axe, H. Ilg, K. Bolsen, Keith C. Behnke

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two finishing trials with heifers and steers were conducted to determine the value of grain dust (GD) to replace cracked corn and to compare soybean meal and urea as protein supplements. Results of the 104-day heifer trial showed that 50% GD supported the least efficient gains. Heifers fed 0 and 25% GD rations had similar performances. In the 75-day steer trial, replacing 12.5 or 25% of the cracked corn in the ration with GD did not affect rate of gain. However, steers fed the GD rations consumed more feed and were less efficient than steers fed the cracked corn ...


Hot Processed Beef--Microbiological Characteristics, C.Y. Lee, Curtis L. Kastner, Michael E. Dikeman, Melvin C. Hunt, Donald H. Kropf, M. Lyon, Daniel Y.C. Fung Jan 1980

Hot Processed Beef--Microbiological Characteristics, C.Y. Lee, Curtis L. Kastner, Michael E. Dikeman, Melvin C. Hunt, Donald H. Kropf, M. Lyon, Daniel Y.C. Fung

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

To help insure that hot-processed beef has an acceptable shelf life and is microbiologically safe, the microbial characteristics of the product must be evaluated. This is particularly true for hot-processed cuts that are packaged and boxed prior to complete chilling--a practice that facilitates handling. An adequate chilling rate the first several hours postmortem is extremely important to the microbiological quality and shelf life of meat. Therefore, in order to insure an acceptable hot-processed beef product, this study was designed to establish chilling rates necessary to satisfactorily control microbial activity in hot-boned beef.


Ground Beef From Electrically Stimulated And Pre-Rigor Processed Carcasses, Melvin C. Hunt, J.L.A. Kendall, Donald H. Kropf, Michael E. Dikeman, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 1980

Ground Beef From Electrically Stimulated And Pre-Rigor Processed Carcasses, Melvin C. Hunt, J.L.A. Kendall, Donald H. Kropf, Michael E. Dikeman, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Ground beef from electrically stimulated and/or pre-rigor processed carcasses was equivalent to conventional ground beef in texture, palatability, and frozen storage stability, but lost more juice when vacuum-stored, had 2% more total cooking losses from patties, and 1 day less shelf life during display.


Summer Annual Silages And Hay For Growing Steers, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, D. Axe, W. Thompson Jan 1980

Summer Annual Silages And Hay For Growing Steers, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, D. Axe, W. Thompson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Sudangrass, pearl millet, sorghum-sudangrass, and forage sorghum silages and sorghum-sudan hay were full-fed to yearling steers in a 90-day trial. Forage sorghum was harvested in the dough stage; the other four forages, in the late-vegetative stage. Steers consumed an average of 12.5% more hay than silage the first 42 days; hay feeding was discontinued then for lack of supply. At 90 days, steers fed forage sorghum silage out-performed those fed the other three silages. Compared with forage sorghum, the other silages had relative feeding values (based on rate and efficiency of gains) of 75% for sudangrass , 62% for pearl ...


Silage Additives, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg Jan 1980

Silage Additives, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Six commercial silage additives were evaluated in five trials with corn, forage sorghum, and alfalfa. In general, each additive improved the silage in at least one of four criteria we used for the comparisons: ensiling temperature, silage dry matter (DM) loss during fermentation, cattle performance, and silage stability in air. The additives lowered ensiling temperatures during the first week by about 5F (range, 2.7 to 9.9F). Additives consistently reduced DM lost during fermentation. Loss from five control silages averaged 10.0% compared with 4.7% from nine silages with additives. No silage additive significantly affected rate of gain ...


Lasalocid Or Rumensin To Prevent Lactic Acidosis In Cattle, S.M. Dennis, T.B. Avery, E.E. Bartley, S.J. Galitzer, Tiruvoor G. Nagaraja Jan 1980

Lasalocid Or Rumensin To Prevent Lactic Acidosis In Cattle, S.M. Dennis, T.B. Avery, E.E. Bartley, S.J. Galitzer, Tiruvoor G. Nagaraja

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Lasalocid or Rumensin (monensin) protected cattle gorged with grain from lactic acidosis. Both lasalocid and monensin prevented the decrease in rumen and blood pH and increase in rumen and blood lactic acid (0(-) isomer) usually associated with lactic acidosis. Lasalocid appears more effective in preventing acidosis than monensin.


Cold-Flo, Sila-Bac, And Silo-Best For Corn Silage, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, Jack G. Riley Jan 1980

Cold-Flo, Sila-Bac, And Silo-Best For Corn Silage, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, Jack G. Riley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Four corn silages (41 to 46% DM) were made August 23 to 26, 1978; treatments were: 1) no additive (control), 2) 8.16 lbs of Cold-flo ammonia per ton, 3) 1.0 lb of Sila-bac per ton, and 4) 1.0 lb of Silo-Best per ton. Silos were opened after 139 days and each was full-fed to 15 heifer calves (3 pens of 5 calves) during a 112-day trial (January 12 to May 4, 1979). The complete-mixed rations contained 88% silage and 12% supplement (Table 19.1). Control silage was supplemented with soybean meal for one group of heifers and ...


Study I: Economic Feasibility Of Hot Processing Beef Carcasses, J. Mccoy, P. Nason, D. Chung, Curtis L. Kastner, A. Lawrence, Michael E. Dikeman, Melvin C. Hunt, Donald H. Kropf Jan 1980

Study I: Economic Feasibility Of Hot Processing Beef Carcasses, J. Mccoy, P. Nason, D. Chung, Curtis L. Kastner, A. Lawrence, Michael E. Dikeman, Melvin C. Hunt, Donald H. Kropf

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Nearly all steer and heifer beef carcasses processed in the United, States are chilled before cutting. However, recent meat science research has shown that carcasses can be processed, and quality of meat maintained, with little or no chilling. Processing as defined here involves cutting the carcasses into subprimal pieces, removing bones and excess fat, sealing the pieces in vacuum packages, and placing the packages in palletized boxes. It is already known that substantial economic saving can be obtained from reduced storage and transportation costs of boxed beef, but little work has been done on the economic feasibility of hot processing.


Study Ii: Electrically Stimulated And Hot-Processed Beef--Color And Eating Qualities, K. Hagele, Michael E. Dikeman, Melvin C. Hunt, Curtis L. Kastner, Donald H. Kropf, M. Lyon Jan 1980

Study Ii: Electrically Stimulated And Hot-Processed Beef--Color And Eating Qualities, K. Hagele, Michael E. Dikeman, Melvin C. Hunt, Curtis L. Kastner, Donald H. Kropf, M. Lyon

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Hot processing is gaining increased interest in the beef processing industry today because of the previously mentioned processing efficiencies and economic advantages. This study examined the color and eating characteristics of electrically stimulated hot-processed beef compared with beef conventionally chilled and processed.


Application And Potential Of Electrical Stimulation, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 1980

Application And Potential Of Electrical Stimulation, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

It has been known for years that electrical stimulation will improve tenderness of meat, but the technique only recently has gained considerable interest in the meat industry. Benjamin Franklin in 1749 observed that killing turkeys electrically made the muscle quite tender. In 1951, Harsham and Deatherage and Rentschler gained separate patents for tenderizing carcasses with electrical stimulation. Tenderness was the most obvious change stemming from electrical stimulation. However, research efforts in New Zealand, England, and the United States have recently attributed other important results to the technique.


Two Semen-Thawing Procedures Compared By Competitively Mating Beef Cows, Kenneth G. Odde, G.H. Kiracofe, H.S. Ward, J. Brethour Jan 1980

Two Semen-Thawing Procedures Compared By Competitively Mating Beef Cows, Kenneth G. Odde, G.H. Kiracofe, H.S. Ward, J. Brethour

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Seventy-five cows were used to compare the fertilizing abilities of sperm packaged in 0.5-ml straws and thawed in warm water to similarly packaged sperm thawed in the inseminating gun. A system of competitive mating provided for inseminating each cow twice. After cows had estrus synchronized, each was artificially inseminated with one straw of Angus semen plus one straw of Simmental semen; semen in one straw was thawed in warm water, the other in the inseminating gun. Calves produced indicated the fertilizing sperm. Of the 20 cows that conceived at the synchronized estrus, 16 conceived to warm water-thawed semen and ...


The Effects Of Rumensin, Protein, Energy, And Post-Weaning Illness On Reproductive Performance In Replacement Heifers, L.R. Sprott, G.H. Kiracofe, L.R. Corah, Jack G. Riley Jan 1980

The Effects Of Rumensin, Protein, Energy, And Post-Weaning Illness On Reproductive Performance In Replacement Heifers, L.R. Sprott, G.H. Kiracofe, L.R. Corah, Jack G. Riley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Rumensin increased the number of heifers cycling at 394 days of age and tended to decrease the weight at puberty, with no effect on conception or pregnancy. Rumensin also increased average daily gain, total weight change, and feed efficiency. Protein level had no direct effect on reproductive or heifer performance. Heifers on higher energy rations tended to cycle s09ner and be younger and lighter at puberty. Higher energy rations caused faster daily gain, more total weight change, and better feed efficiency. Post-weaning sickness had no effect on reproductive performance or growth.


Intake Of Milk And Range Forage By Nursing Calves, A. Peischel, R.R. Schalles, Clenton E. Owensby, E.F. Smith Jan 1980

Intake Of Milk And Range Forage By Nursing Calves, A. Peischel, R.R. Schalles, Clenton E. Owensby, E.F. Smith

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Adequate milk production by the cow to promote fast gain by her calf the first three months is important for heavy weaning weights. Calves consume considerable range forage by three months of age, and milk consumption begins to decrease. As grass begins to mature in September, milk from the dam and range forage eaten by the calf (as a percentage of body weight) decrease to below recommended protein level, so gains decrease. Weaning calves and placing them on a higher nutrition level in late August or early September may be considered when continued fast gains are desired.


Effect Of Ralgro On The Performance Of Cull Beef Cows, L.R. Corah, F. Brazle, J.D. Dawes Jan 1980

Effect Of Ralgro On The Performance Of Cull Beef Cows, L.R. Corah, F. Brazle, J.D. Dawes

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We assigned 110 cull beef cows of mixed breeding to a control group and a group implanted with 36 mg Ralgro. Ralgro implants improved gains 12.8 lbs (11.2%) over a 59-day grazing period.


Grazing Cattle On Alfalfa, D. Hayes, L. Corah, E.E. Bartley Jan 1980

Grazing Cattle On Alfalfa, D. Hayes, L. Corah, E.E. Bartley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Data collected from six producers grazing 4050 head of cattle on 850 acres of irrigated alfalfa showed that under optimum conditions, Kansas producers can expect: stocking rate, 5 to 6 head/acre; average daily gain, 2 lbs +; total pounds of beef/acre, 1300 to 1500 lbs; and death loss below 1%. Bloat Guard 2,3 performed the best when added to a grain supplement.


Silo-Best For Corn Silage, K. Bolsen, Jack G. Riley Jan 1980

Silo-Best For Corn Silage, K. Bolsen, Jack G. Riley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two corn silages (37 to 38% DM) were made September 2 and 3, 1975; one was ensiled without additive (control), the other with Silo-Best added at 1.0 lb. per ton of fresh crop. Silos were opened after 36 days, and each silage was full-fed to 15 yearling steers (3 pens of 5 steers) during an 87-day trial (October 10, 1975, to January 5, 1976). Complete-mixed rations contained 86% silage and 14% soybean meal supplement on a DM basis.


Silo-Guard For Forage Sorghum Silage, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg Jan 1980

Silo-Guard For Forage Sorghum Silage, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two forage sorghum silages (29 to 30% DM) were made October 1 to 3, 1978; one ensiled without additive (control), the other with 1.5 lbs. of Silo-Guard added per ton of fresh crop. Silos were opened after 36 days, and each was full-fed to 15 yearling steers (3 pens of 5 steers) during a 90-day trial (November 9, 1978, to February 7, 1979). Rations contained 84% silage and 16% soybean meal supplement on a DM basis.


Effects Of Location And Crushing Ralgro Implants On Cattle Performance (Summary Of Three Trials), L.R. Corah, S.D. Plegge, G. Francis Jan 1980

Effects Of Location And Crushing Ralgro Implants On Cattle Performance (Summary Of Three Trials), L.R. Corah, S.D. Plegge, G. Francis

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Implanting at an alternate location (in the muscle or fat pad at the base of the ear) or crushing the pellets did not appear to cause side effects or adversely affect animal performance. However, implanting at the alternate location significantly improved (6.6%) average daily gain in all three trials. Based on these and other studies, the recommended location for Ralgro implants is as close to the base of the ear as possible.


Factors Influencing Net Income From Steers Through Feedlot, R.R. Schalles, K.O. Zoellner, K. Long Jan 1980

Factors Influencing Net Income From Steers Through Feedlot, R.R. Schalles, K.O. Zoellner, K. Long

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Calves that gained rapidly before going into the feedlot continued to gain rapidly on feed and were more profitable to both the cow-calf operator and the feeder. When fed to their genetic potential, large frame, heavy, young cattle were worth more to the cattle industry than light calves.