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1997

Nomenclature

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Problems In Cladistic Classification: Higher-Level Relationships In Land Plants, Peter R. Crane, Paul Kenrick Jan 1997

Problems In Cladistic Classification: Higher-Level Relationships In Land Plants, Peter R. Crane, Paul Kenrick

Aliso: A Journal of Systematic and Floristic Botany

Recent cladistic analyses of green plants recognize an extensive hierarchical series of relatively well-supported monophyletic groups. Translating this hierarchical pattern of relationships into a usable and informative written classification is important for purposes of scientific communication, research and teaching. However, in the context of the "Linnean" hierarchy, as manifested in the current International code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN), effecting this translation confronts substantial practical difficulties--especially the proliferation of hierarchical levels. These problems are exacerbated by the current emphasis of the ICBN on a hierarchy in which different ranks have different formal rank-based endings. These difficulties could be ameliorated by de-emphasizing ...


Hierarchial Roots And Shoots Or Opera Jehovae Magna! (Psalms 111:2), Dan H. Nicolson Jan 1997

Hierarchial Roots And Shoots Or Opera Jehovae Magna! (Psalms 111:2), Dan H. Nicolson

Aliso: A Journal of Systematic and Floristic Botany

The philosophy of Linnaeus's classification, Systema Naturae, is briefly reviewed, as well as those of post-Linnaean systems of plant classification. Texts of current codes of nomenclature pertaining to hierarchy, including associated rank terminations, are compared.


The Linnaean Hierarchy And The Evolutionization Of Taxonomy, With Emphasis On The Problem Of Nomenclature, Kevin De Queiroz Jan 1997

The Linnaean Hierarchy And The Evolutionization Of Taxonomy, With Emphasis On The Problem Of Nomenclature, Kevin De Queiroz

Aliso: A Journal of Systematic and Floristic Botany

During the post-Darwinian history of taxonomy, the Linnaean hierarchy has maintained its role as a means for representing hierarchical taxonomic relationships. During the same period, the principle of descent has taken on an increasingly important role as the basis for reformulated versions of fundamental taxonomic concepts and principles. Early in this history, the principle of descent provided an explanation for the existence of taxa and implied a nested, hierarchical structure for taxonomic relationships. Although an evolutionary explanation for taxa contradicted the Aristotelian context within which the Linnaean hierarchy was developed, the nested, hierarchical structure of taxonomic rela· tionships implied by ...