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Subsequent Carcass Merit Of Feedlot Cattle May Be Improved By Limit Feeding A High-Energy Diet During The Backgrounding Phase, M. A. Scilacci, M. A. Johnson, C. E. Hissong, S. P. Montgomery, T. G. O'Quinn, A. J. Tarpoff, E. C. Titgemeyer, K. Montgomery, G. T. Tonsor, C. I. Vahl, D. U. Thomson, W. R. Hollenbeck, D. A. Blasi Jan 2021

Subsequent Carcass Merit Of Feedlot Cattle May Be Improved By Limit Feeding A High-Energy Diet During The Backgrounding Phase, M. A. Scilacci, M. A. Johnson, C. E. Hissong, S. P. Montgomery, T. G. O'Quinn, A. J. Tarpoff, E. C. Titgemeyer, K. Montgomery, G. T. Tonsor, C. I. Vahl, D. U. Thomson, W. R. Hollenbeck, D. A. Blasi

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Objective: Determine and analyze the impact of limit feeding a high-energy diet in the backgrounding phase, primarily based on dry-rolled corn and Sweet Bran (Cargill Animal Nutrition, Blair, NE), on animal performance in the finishing phase and carcass merit.

Study Description: This project was a continuation of the performance backgrounding study previously conducted at the Kansas State University Beef Stocker Unit. All cattle were shipped to Pratt Feeders (Pratt, KS) on August 26–27, 2019, and were fed in four separate feed groups (approximately 100 head/pen) according to standard operating practices at the feed yard. Original backgrounding treatment integrity ...


Antioxidant Feeding Does Not Impact Incidence Or Severity Of Liver Abscesses, H. C. Muller, C. L. Van Bibber-Krueger, J. S. Drouillard Jan 2017

Antioxidant Feeding Does Not Impact Incidence Or Severity Of Liver Abscesses, H. C. Muller, C. L. Van Bibber-Krueger, J. S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Liver abscesses are a large source of economic loss in feedlot cattle. Not only do liver abscesses lead to a decrease in feedlot performance, but these livers are condemned in the abattoir and can also lead to a further decrease in carcass value due to trim loss. Tylosin phosphate is a metaphylactic macrolide drug that effectively decreases the occurrence of liver abscesses. The drug is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for over-the-counter use. However, in January 2017 the FDA will require a veterinary feed directive for medically important antibiotics (antibiotics that are used in human health) used in ...


Intermittent Feeding Of Tylan Reduces Use Of In-Feed Antibiotics While Still Controlling Incidence Of Liver Abscesses In Finishing Steers, H. C. Muller, R. G. Amachawadi, H. M. Scott, J. S. Drouillard Jan 2017

Intermittent Feeding Of Tylan Reduces Use Of In-Feed Antibiotics While Still Controlling Incidence Of Liver Abscesses In Finishing Steers, H. C. Muller, R. G. Amachawadi, H. M. Scott, J. S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Liver abscesses are a cause of concern for many feedlots across the country as they lead to a decrease in feedlot performance of finishing cattle as well as a decrease in the final carcass value. Loss in carcass value is due to not only the abscessed liver being condemned, but also due to trim loss associated with the condemned liver. The macrolide drug tylosin phosphate is the drug of choice for metaphylactic treatment of liver abscesses in feedlot cattle. The Food and Drug Administration approved the drug for over-the-counter use, however, from January 2017 all medically important (used in human ...


Liver Abscess Severity At Slaughter Does Not Affect Meat Tenderness And Sensory Attributes In Commercially Finished Beef Cattle Fed Without Tylosin Phosphate, E. J. Mccoy, T. G. O'Quinn, E. F. Schwandt, C. D. Reinhardt, D. U. Thomson Jan 2017

Liver Abscess Severity At Slaughter Does Not Affect Meat Tenderness And Sensory Attributes In Commercially Finished Beef Cattle Fed Without Tylosin Phosphate, E. J. Mccoy, T. G. O'Quinn, E. F. Schwandt, C. D. Reinhardt, D. U. Thomson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Liver abscesses are a significant problem in the United States’ cattle feeding industry, costing the industry an estimated $15.9 million annually in liver condemnation, trim losses, and reduced carcass weights and quality grades. Recent reported incidence rates of liver abscesses at slaughter range from 10 to 20%. Liver abscess incidence may be influenced by a number of factors including: breed, gender, diet, days on feed, cattle type, season, and geographical location. Liver abscesses typically occur secondary to rumen insults caused by acidosis or rumenitis. It has been proposed that pathogens associated with liver abscess formation enter the blood stream ...