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Marbling Texture Does Not Affect Consumer Preference Of Beef Strip Loin Steaks, K. R. Vierck, J. M. Gonzalez, T. A. Houser, E. A. Boyle, T. G. O'Quinn Jan 2017

Marbling Texture Does Not Affect Consumer Preference Of Beef Strip Loin Steaks, K. R. Vierck, J. M. Gonzalez, T. A. Houser, E. A. Boyle, T. G. O'Quinn

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In the beef industry, U.S. Department of Agriculture quality grades and marbling levels have long been associated with beef palatability and eating experience. Marbling score and maturity are the two major components of USDA quality grade. Traditionally, marbling texture has not been considered a factor of marbling score; however, there are often discernments at both the packer and retail level, as more than 75% of branded beef programs supervised by USDA-AMS have a specification of fine or medium textured marbling (USDA, 2015). Additionally, in some cases, fine and medium textured steaks are graded higher than their coarse counterparts, which ...


Sudden Death Syndrome And Soybean Planting Date, Eric Adee, C. R. Little, I. A. Ciampitti Jan 2017

Sudden Death Syndrome And Soybean Planting Date, Eric Adee, C. R. Little, I. A. Ciampitti

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The effect of planting date on severity of sudden death syndrome (SDS) and yield was evaluated for the second year in two studies at the Kansas River Valley experiment fields in 2016. One study was established to promote SDS and the other to minimize SDS. In both studies the severity of SDS was greatest with the earlier planting dates. The yield was greatest with the earlier planting date, except for the most susceptible variety. The severity of SDS was not as great as had been observed in previous years. There is a very positive benefit to planting in early May ...


Seed Yield And Biological Nitrogen Fixation For Historical Soybean Genotypes, S. Tamagno, I. A. Ciampitti Jan 2017

Seed Yield And Biological Nitrogen Fixation For Historical Soybean Genotypes, S. Tamagno, I. A. Ciampitti

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Seed yield formation and biological nitrogen (N) fixation (BNF) were evaluated during the seed filling period (SFP) for historical soybean genotypes under contrasting N strategies. Overall, seed yield increased with the year of release, primarily associated with increments in the seed number component. The study showed that seed weight factor was maintained across decades regardless of the improvement in seed number. Nitrogen factor, evaluated as zero-N application via inorganic fertilizers versus high-N added, influenced seed yield via impacting seed weight factor. The latter plant trait improved with the high-N treatment, which was related to changes in the duration of the ...


Wheat Variety Response To Intensive Vs. Standard Management Strategies To Narrow The Yield Gap In Kansas, A. De Oliveira Silva, A. K. Fritz, R. Lollato Jan 2017

Wheat Variety Response To Intensive Vs. Standard Management Strategies To Narrow The Yield Gap In Kansas, A. De Oliveira Silva, A. K. Fritz, R. Lollato

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Farmer-reported wheat grain yield in Kansas is approximately 35 bushels per acre lower than the estimated yield potential of ~75 bushels per acre. Our objective was to determine the influence of variety selection and management on grain yield to elucidate methods to decrease the wheat yield gap in Kansas. Field experiments were conducted at three locations (Ellsworth, Conway Springs and McPherson) in Kansas during the 2015-2016 growing season to evaluate variety-specific response to nitrogen (N) and foliar fungicide. At each site, 35 to 44 winter wheat varieties were evaluated under standard management practice (SM) based on current farmer’s practice ...


Effect Of Parity And Stage Of Gestation On Maternal Growth And Feed Efficiency Of Gestating Sows, L. L. Thomas, R. D. Goodband, M. D. Tokach, S. S. Dritz, J. C. Woodworth, J. M. Derouchey Jan 2017

Effect Of Parity And Stage Of Gestation On Maternal Growth And Feed Efficiency Of Gestating Sows, L. L. Thomas, R. D. Goodband, M. D. Tokach, S. S. Dritz, J. C. Woodworth, J. M. Derouchey

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of parity and stage of gestation on maternal weight gain and efficiency of feed use in group-housed gestating sows from a commercial sow farm. A total of 712 females (Camborough, PIC, Hendersonville, TN) were group-housed from d 5 to 112 of gestation and individually fed with electronic sow feeders (ESF). Feed intake and BW were recorded daily throughout gestation via the ESF and a scale located in an alleyway just after sows exited the feeding station. Gilts (parity 1) and sows received 6.5 and 7.3 Mcal ME per ...


The Effects Of Cold Pelleting And Separation Of Fine Corn Particles On Growth Performance And Economic Return In Nursery Pigs, C. E. Evans, M. Saensukjaroenphon, C. K. Jones, J. M. Derouchey, J. C. Woodworth, M. D. Tokach, C. B. Paulk, C. R. Stark Jan 2017

The Effects Of Cold Pelleting And Separation Of Fine Corn Particles On Growth Performance And Economic Return In Nursery Pigs, C. E. Evans, M. Saensukjaroenphon, C. K. Jones, J. M. Derouchey, J. C. Woodworth, M. D. Tokach, C. B. Paulk, C. R. Stark

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A total of 320 pigs (DNA 241 × 600; initially 22.5 lb BW) were used in a 21-d experiment to determine the effects on pelleting technique and removing fine corn particles (< 150 microns) on nursery pig growth performance. There were 5 pigs per pen and 8 pens per treatment and diets were all manufactured using corn ground to 400 microns. Diets were fed as a mash or pelleted using a traditional vertical die pellet mill equipped with a steam conditioner (steam pellet) or a horizontal pellet die with hot water conditioning prior to pelleting (cold pellet). Therefore, the 8 treatments were: 1) ground corn diet fed as mash, 2) ground corn diet steam pelleted, 3) ground corn diet cold pelleted, 4) ground corn with fines less than 150 microns removed from the diet and the diet fed as mash, 5) ground corn with fines less than 150 microns removed from the diet and the diet without fines was steam pelleted, 6) ground corn with fines less than 150 microns removed from the diet and the diet without fines was cold pelleted, 7) fines less than 150 microns were steam pelleted then proportionally added back to ground corn and fed as a mixture of pellets and mash, and 8) fines less than 150 microns were cold pelleted then proportionally added back to ground corn and fed as a mixture of pellets and mash. Removal of fines less than 150 microns from the corn improved the flowability characteristics of the diets as indicated by improved composite flow index values. The best flowability was achieved when fines were pelleted and added back to the mash diets. Pigs fed steam- or cold-pelleted diets had decreased (P < 0.02) ADG, ADFI, and d-21 BW, total feed cost, revenue, and income over feed cost (IOFC) compared to those fed mash diets. Pigs fed steam pelleted diets had decreased (P < 0.006) ADG, d-21 BW, revenue, and IOFC compared to those fed cold pelleted diets. There were no growth performance differences between pigs fed ground corn diets or ground corn diets with fines removed. Pigs fed diets with fines removed, pelleted, and subsequently added back had increased (P < 0.05) ADFI, F/G, and feed cost compared to all other treatments. It is assumed that this response resulted from increased feed wastage resulting from pigs sorting pellets mixed with mash diets. The results of this study indicate that removing particles less than 150 microns improved the flowability of a mash diet without sacrificing growth performance. Additionally, cold pelleting was a viable option to steam pelleting in the current experiment. However, pelleting diets reduced pig performance compared to pigs fed mash diets. Further research is needed to validate the response to cold pelleting when the expected response to pelleting using steam conditioning is achieved.


Southwest Research-Extension Center, Kansas State University, Staff, Acknowledgments, R. Gillen Jan 2017

Southwest Research-Extension Center, Kansas State University, Staff, Acknowledgments, R. Gillen

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

2017 Southwest Research-Extension Center Faculty and Staff. Acknowledgments.


Kansas River Valley Experiment Field, Eric Adee Jan 2017

Kansas River Valley Experiment Field, Eric Adee

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The Kansas River Valley Experiment Field was established to study management and effective use of irrigation resources for crop production in the Kansas River Valley (KRV). The Paramore Unit consists of 80 acres located 3.5 miles east of Silver Lake on U.S. Highway 24, then 1 mile south of Kiro, and 1.5 miles east on 17th street. The Rossville Unit consists of 80 acres located 1 mile east of Rossville or 4 miles west of Silver Lake on U.S. Highway 24.


Closing Corn Yield Gaps Via Improved Management: A Systems Approach, G. R. Balboa, I. A. Ciampitti Jan 2017

Closing Corn Yield Gaps Via Improved Management: A Systems Approach, G. R. Balboa, I. A. Ciampitti

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Three corn research trials were conducted during the 2016 growing season. Two studies were conducted at Scandia, KS, (dryland and irrigated) and one at Topeka, KS (dryland). The objective of these trials was to investigate the contribution of different farming systems for closing corn yield gaps. Each experiment consisted of five treatments: common practices (CP), comprehensive fertilization (CF), production intensity (PI), ecological intensification (CF + PI), and advanced plus (AD). Across all three experiments and under dryland and irrigation scenarios, CP presented the lowest yield. In environments with yield response, intensifying production without a balanced nutrition program did not increase yields ...


Cropping Sequence Influenced Crop Yield, Soil Water Content, Residue Return, And Co2 Efflux In Wheat-Camelina Cropping System, E. Obeng, A. Obour, N. O. Nelson, I. A. Ciampitti, Donghai Wang, E. A. Santos Jan 2017

Cropping Sequence Influenced Crop Yield, Soil Water Content, Residue Return, And Co2 Efflux In Wheat-Camelina Cropping System, E. Obeng, A. Obour, N. O. Nelson, I. A. Ciampitti, Donghai Wang, E. A. Santos

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Camelina (Camelina sativa L. Crantz) is a short-seasoned oilseed crop with potential as a fallow replacement crop in dryland wheat (Triticum aestivum) - based cropping systems. Crop rotation management can affect the quality and quantity of crop residue return to the system. In addition, residue has the ability to sequester carbon and can affect plant available water. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of replacing fallow with camelina on crop yield, soil water at wheat planting, soil carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from treatments, and residue return. Treatments were four rotation schemes, and included wheat-fallow (W-F), wheat-sorghum-fallow (W-S-F), wheat-spring ...


Effect Of Residue Management, Row Spacing, And Seeding Rate On Winter Canola Establishment, Winter Survival, And Yield, B. M. Showalter, K. Roozeboom, M. J. Stamm, R. Figger Jan 2017

Effect Of Residue Management, Row Spacing, And Seeding Rate On Winter Canola Establishment, Winter Survival, And Yield, B. M. Showalter, K. Roozeboom, M. J. Stamm, R. Figger

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Winter survival of canola (Brassica napus L.) is a challenge for producers using high-residue, no-tillage, or reduced-tillage systems. An innovative residue management system being developed by AGCO Corporation was compared to cooperating canola producers’ residue management and planting methods in wheat stubble. This series of on-farm experiments was conducted in 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 at ten locations in central and south-central Kansas. The AGCO treatments were 20- or 30-in. row spacing and three seeding rates (100,000, 150,000, and 200,000 seeds/a) for a total of six treatments. The producer treatment at each location included row spacing, seeding rate ...


Irrigated Sunflowers In Northwest Kansas: Productivity And Canopy Formation, F. Lamm, R. M. Aiken, A. A. Aboukheira, G. J. Seiler Jan 2017

Irrigated Sunflowers In Northwest Kansas: Productivity And Canopy Formation, F. Lamm, R. M. Aiken, A. A. Aboukheira, G. J. Seiler

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Sunflower was grown in a three-year study (2009, 2010, and 2012) at the Kansas State University Northwest Research-Extension Center at Colby, KS, under a lateral move sprinkler irrigation system. Irrigation capacities were limited to no more than 1 inch every 4, 8, or 12 days but were scheduled only as needed as determined with a weather-based water budget. Achene (sunflower seed) yields and oil yield generally plateaued at the medium irrigation level. Dormant preseason irrigation increased achene yield and oil yield by 2% with most of this increase occurring in the extreme drought year, 2012. The optimum harvest plant population ...


Evaluation Of Elarom Ses With Or Without Tri-Basic Copper Chloride On Nursery Pig Growth Performance, H. Williams, J. C. Woodworth, J. M. Derouchey, S. S. Dritz, M. D. Tokach, R. D. Goodband Jan 2017

Evaluation Of Elarom Ses With Or Without Tri-Basic Copper Chloride On Nursery Pig Growth Performance, H. Williams, J. C. Woodworth, J. M. Derouchey, S. S. Dritz, M. D. Tokach, R. D. Goodband

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A total of 360 weanling pigs (DNA 200 × 400; initially 11.5 lb BW) were used in a 42-d study evaluating the effects of feeding Elarom SES in combination with increasing tri-basic copper chloride on nursery pig performance and fecal consistency. Elarom SES (Trouw Nutrition USA, Highland, IL) is a specialty feed ingredient containing a blend of active ingredients designed to enhance growth performance and gut health. Tri-basic copper chloride (TBCC, Intellibond C, Micronutrients USA, LLC., Indianapolis, IN) is a form of copper (Cu) that has the potential for improved bioavailability and enhanced growth performance. Pigs were weaned at approximately ...


Effects Of Increasing Copper From Tri-Basic Copper Chloride Or A Copper-Chelate On Growth Performance Of Nursery Pigs, C. Carpenter, J. C. Woodworth, J. M. Derouchey, M. D. Tokach, R. D. Goodband, S. S. Dritz, J. L. Usry Jan 2017

Effects Of Increasing Copper From Tri-Basic Copper Chloride Or A Copper-Chelate On Growth Performance Of Nursery Pigs, C. Carpenter, J. C. Woodworth, J. M. Derouchey, M. D. Tokach, R. D. Goodband, S. S. Dritz, J. L. Usry

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A total of 1,452 pigs [Group 1; 350 barrows (DNA 200 × 400; initially 13.2 lb)] and [Group 2; 1,102 barrows and gilts (PIC 1050 × 280; initially 13.3 lb)] were used to determine the effects of added Cu source and level on nursery pig performance. There were 5 pigs per pen and 10 replications per treatment in group 1, and 24 to 27 pigs per pen and 6 replications per treatment in group 2. Pens of pigs were allotted by BW to 1 of 7 dietary treatments arranged as a 2 × 3 factorial plus a control diet ...


Development Of A Berry Processing Score For Sorghum Silage And Assessment Of Processing Effects On Sorghum Silage Starch Digestibility, J. R. Johnson, J. P. Goeser, Michael Brouk Jan 2017

Development Of A Berry Processing Score For Sorghum Silage And Assessment Of Processing Effects On Sorghum Silage Starch Digestibility, J. R. Johnson, J. P. Goeser, Michael Brouk

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The objectives of this study were to develop a berry processing score (BPS) for sorghum silage, similar to the kernel processing score currently used for corn silage, and to evaluate the effects of processing on starch digestibility. Sorghum silage samples were collected from commercial farms in Kansas and randomly assigned to 1 of 4 processing levels differing in roll gap spacing: unprocessed (UNP), 1.5 (1.5P), 1.0 (1.0P), or 0.5 (0.5P) mm. Differences in BPS and starch digestibility were found–as the roll gap decreased, both BPS and starch digestibility increased. Thus, by processing sorghum ...


Twenty-Four Hour Holter Monitoring In Finishing Cattle Housed Outdoors, D. A. Frese, J. D. Thomason, C. D. Reinhardt, S. J. Bartle, D. N. Rethorst, G. H. Loneragan, E. F. Schwandt, D. U. Thomson Jan 2017

Twenty-Four Hour Holter Monitoring In Finishing Cattle Housed Outdoors, D. A. Frese, J. D. Thomason, C. D. Reinhardt, S. J. Bartle, D. N. Rethorst, G. H. Loneragan, E. F. Schwandt, D. U. Thomson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring, in the form of Holter monitoring, has been used in human and veterinary medicine for decades as an aid in the diagnosis and determination of appropriate therapy of heart rhythm disturbances. Within veterinary medicine, Holter monitors have been primarily used in companion animal species, yet little attention has been given to food animal species. Moreover, the heart rhythm in clinically normal cattle fed high concentrate diets and housed outdoors in confined drylot facilities has not been previously reported. In order to properly identify pathologic arrhythmias in cattle, the normal rhythm and arrhythmia prevalence in healthy cattle should ...


Brahman Genetics Negatively Impact Protein Degradation And Tenderness Of Longissimus Lumborum Steaks, But Do Not Influence Collagen Cross-Linking, K. J. Phelps, D. D. Johnson, M. A. Elzo, C. B. Paulk, J. M. Gonzalez Jan 2017

Brahman Genetics Negatively Impact Protein Degradation And Tenderness Of Longissimus Lumborum Steaks, But Do Not Influence Collagen Cross-Linking, K. J. Phelps, D. D. Johnson, M. A. Elzo, C. B. Paulk, J. M. Gonzalez

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Beef tenderness is an important factor contributing to consumer eating satisfaction of beef products. Tenderness is dependent on several factors including: breed-type, postmortem age time, myofibrillar muscle protein degradation, and collagen content. During the past 30 years, numerous studies have indicated steaks from cattle with a greater percentage of Brahman genetics are tougher than steaks from Bos taurus cattle. The cause of tougher steaks is commonly attributed to Brahman cattle having a greater calpastatin activity which inhibits calpains, the enzymes responsible for myofibrillar protein degradation during the postmortem aging process. Some researchers have reported calpastatin activity was poorly correlated to ...


Director's Report Of Research In Kansas, 2016, J. E. Minton Jan 2017

Director's Report Of Research In Kansas, 2016, J. E. Minton

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The 2016 Director’s Report of Research in Kansas includes a list of journal articles, station publications, and other published manuscripts from scientists in our departments, research-extension centers, and associated programs.


Searc Agricultural Research 2017, L. W. Lomas Jan 2017

Searc Agricultural Research 2017, L. W. Lomas

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Southeast Agricultural Research Center, Agricultural Research 2017. Topics include grazing and supplemental feed for beef cattle, forage, pasture, hay, grasses, legumes, tillage, fertilizer, corn, soybeans, wheat, and soil health and variability.


Integrated Grain And Forage Rotations, J. D. Holman, A. Obour, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell Jan 2017

Integrated Grain And Forage Rotations, J. D. Holman, A. Obour, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Producers are interested in growing forages in rotation with grain crops. Many producers are interested in diversifying their operations to include livestock or grow feed for the livestock industry. By integrating forages into the cropping system producers can take advantage of more markets and reduce market risk. Forages require less water to make a crop than grain crops, so the potential may exist to reduce fallow by including forages in the crop rotation. Reducing fallow through intensified grain/forage rotations may increase the profitability and sustainability compared to existing crop rotations.

This study was started in 2013, with crops grown ...


Tillage Intensity In A Long-Term Wheat-Sorghum-Fallow Rotation, A. Schlegel Jan 2017

Tillage Intensity In A Long-Term Wheat-Sorghum-Fallow Rotation, A. Schlegel

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This study was initiated in 1991 at the Kansas State University Southwest Research- Extension Center near Tribune, KS. The purpose of the study was to identify the effects of tillage intensity on precipitation capture, soil water storage, and grain yield in a wheat-sorghum-fallow rotation. Grain yields of wheat and grain sorghum increased with decreased tillage intensity in a wheat-sorghum-fallow (WSF) rotation. In 2016, available soil water at wheat and sorghum planting was greater for reduced tillage (RT) than no-tillage (NT) and least for conventional tillage (CT). Averaged across the 16-yr study, available soil water at wheat and sorghum planting was ...


Estimating Annual Forage Yields With Plant Available Water And Growing Season Precipitation, J. D. Holman, A. Obour, I. Kisekka, A. Schlegel, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell Jan 2017

Estimating Annual Forage Yields With Plant Available Water And Growing Season Precipitation, J. D. Holman, A. Obour, I. Kisekka, A. Schlegel, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Forage production is important for western Kansas region’s livestock and dairy industries and has become increasingly important as irrigation-well capacity declines. Forages require less water than grain crops and may allow for increased cropping intensity and opportunistic cropping. Being able to estimate forage production is important for determining forage availability versus forage needs. Data from several studies were used to quantify annual forage yield response to plant available water (PAW) at planting and growing season precipitation (GSP). In addition, water use efficiency was quantified. Forages evaluated included winter triticale, spring triticale, and forage sorghum.


Large-Scale Dryland Cropping Systems, A. Schlegel, L. Haag Jan 2017

Large-Scale Dryland Cropping Systems, A. Schlegel, L. Haag

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This study was conducted from 2008 to 2016 at the Kansas State University Southwest Research-Extension Center near Tribune, KS. The purpose of the study was to identify whether more intensive cropping systems can enhance and stabilize production in rainfed cropping systems to optimize economic crop production, more efficiently capture and utilize scarce precipitation, and maintain or enhance soil resources and environmental quality. The crop rotations evaluated were continuous grain sorghum (SS), wheat-fallow (WF), wheat-corn-fallow (WCF), wheat-sorghum-fallow (WSF), wheat-corn-sorghum-fallow (WCSF), and wheat-sorghum-corn-fallow (WSCF). All rotations were grown using no-tillage practices except for WF, which was grown using reduced-tillage. The efficiency of ...


Wheat Stubble Height On Subsequent Corn And Grain Sorghum Crops, A. Schlegel, L. Haag Jan 2017

Wheat Stubble Height On Subsequent Corn And Grain Sorghum Crops, A. Schlegel, L. Haag

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A field study initiated in 2006 at the Southwest Research-Extension Center near Tribune, KS, was designed to evaluate the effects of three wheat stubble heights on subsequent grain yields of corn and grain sorghum. Corn and sorghum yields in 2016 were greater than the long-term average. When averaged from 2007 through 2016, corn grain yields were 10 bu/a greater when planted into either high or strip-cut stubble than into low-cut stubble. Average grain sorghum yields were 6 bu/a (but not significantly) greater in high-cut stubble than low-cut stubble. Similarly, water use efficiency was greater for high or strip-cut ...


Wheat And Grain Sorghum In Four-Year Rotations, A. Schlegel, J. D. Holman, C. Thompson Jan 2017

Wheat And Grain Sorghum In Four-Year Rotations, A. Schlegel, J. D. Holman, C. Thompson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In 1996, an effort began to quantify soil water storage, crop water use, and crop productivity on dryland systems in western Kansas. Research on 4-year crop rotations with wheat and grain sorghum was initiated at the Southwest Research-Extension Center near Tribune, KS. Rotations were wheat-wheat-sorghum-fallow (WWSF), wheatsorghum- sorghum-fallow (WSSF), and continuous wheat (WW). Soil water at wheat planting averaged about 9 in. following sorghum, which is about 3 in. more than the average for the second wheat crop in a WWSF rotation. Soil water at sorghum planting was only about 1 in. less for the second sorghum crop compared with ...


Seeding Rate For Dryland Wheat, A. Schlegel, J. D. Holman, L. Haag Jan 2017

Seeding Rate For Dryland Wheat, A. Schlegel, J. D. Holman, L. Haag

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Four winter wheat varieties (PlainsGold Byrd, Limagrain T158, Syngenta TAM 111, and WestBred Winterhawk) were planted at five seeding rates (30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 lb/a) in the fall of 2014 and 2015 at Colby, Garden City, and Tribune, KS. The objective of the study was to identify appropriate seeding rates for dryland winter wheat in western Kansas. Averaged across varieties, a seeding rate of 60 lb/a seemed to be adequate at all locations in 2015. However, with higher yields in 2016, a higher seeding rate (75 lb/a) was beneficial. The wheat variety T158 was the ...


Alternative Cropping Systems With Limited Irrigation, A. Schlegel Jan 2017

Alternative Cropping Systems With Limited Irrigation, A. Schlegel

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A limited irrigation study involving four cropping systems and evaluating four crop rotations was initiated at the Southwest Research-Extension Center near Tribune, KS, in 2012. The cropping systems were two annual systems (continuous corn [C-C] and continuous grain sorghum [GS-GS]) and two 2-year systems (corn-grain sorghum [CGS]) and corn-winter wheat [C-W]). In 2016, corn yields were similar in all rotations, as were grain sorghum yields. This tended to agree with the 4-yr average yields, except for average grain sorghum yields being higher following corn than grain sorghum.


Forage Report 2016, J. D. Holman, G. Cramer, A. Esser, Jane Lingenfelser, S. Maxwell, J. L. Moyer, A. Obour, T. Roberts Jan 2017

Forage Report 2016, J. D. Holman, G. Cramer, A. Esser, Jane Lingenfelser, S. Maxwell, J. L. Moyer, A. Obour, T. Roberts

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In 2016 summer annual forage variety trials were conducted across Kansas near Garden City, Hays, Hutchinson, Mound Valley, and Scandia. All sites evaluated hay and silage entries. Companies were able to enter varieties into any possible combinations of research sites, so not all sites had all varieties. Across the sites, a total of 99 hay varieties and 99 silage varieties were evaluated.


Exploring The Value Of Plant Analysis To Enhance Water Use Efficiency In Southwest Kansas, A. J. Foster, I. Kisekka, B. Golden Jan 2017

Exploring The Value Of Plant Analysis To Enhance Water Use Efficiency In Southwest Kansas, A. J. Foster, I. Kisekka, B. Golden

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Nutrient deficiency is identified by use of visual symptoms. However, the application of the proposed deficient nutrient often does not result in the correction of the observed visual symptoms. This is because essential nutrients do not operate independently of each other or independently of the overall plant health and growing conditions. A study was initiated in 2016 at the Kansas State University Southwest Research-Extension Center Finnup Farm near Garden City, KS, to use both soil and plant analyses to identify toxicities or hidden deficiencies that could be limiting corn yield at various irrigation capacities. Soil samples prior to planting and ...


Balance Pro, Atrazine, Autumn Super, Corvus, Sencor, Authority, And Banvel For Preemergence Kochia Control In Fallow, R. Currie, P. Geier Jan 2017

Balance Pro, Atrazine, Autumn Super, Corvus, Sencor, Authority, And Banvel For Preemergence Kochia Control In Fallow, R. Currie, P. Geier

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A study was initiated near Garden City, KS, in 2016 comparing kochia control of several herbicide treatments and their time of application in fallow. Spring applications of five tank mixes containing the active ingredient isoxaflutole provided greater than 92% control of kochia. Fall applications of similar tank mixes provided from 78 to 84% control. Tank mixes of atrazine and dicamba applied in the spring provided only 89% control.