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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Nf98-378 Juvenile Diversion, Stephen T. Russell, Susan Wood Jan 1998

Nf98-378 Juvenile Diversion, Stephen T. Russell, Susan Wood

Agricultural Research Division News & Annual Reports

This NebFact discusses the opportunities juvenile diversion programs offer at-risk youth.


Ec98-758 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 11: Land Application Of Manure, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-758 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 11: Land Application Of Manure, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Stewardship of soil and water resources should be a goal of every livestock producer. Management decisions made relative to land application of livestock manure will influence the ability to attain that goal.


Perceptions Of Costa Rican Agricultural Employers Regarding Skills And Competencies Needed By Agriculturalists , Xenia Ceville Gray Jan 1998

Perceptions Of Costa Rican Agricultural Employers Regarding Skills And Competencies Needed By Agriculturalists , Xenia Ceville Gray

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

During the last decade a gap has existed between the education offered by institutions of higher education in Latin America in the agricultural sciences and the concrete needs of farmers, potential employers and society. The graduates from colleges and universities in the region are not meeting the needs of agriculturally oriented national/international companies nor the demands from small farmers;The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge and skills needed by Ingenieros Agronomos with the Licenciatura degree as perceived by their potential employers in the agriculture sector, namely private businesses, government and non-government agencies, and international development ...


G98-1364 Feeding Children Ages 2 To 5, H. Darlene Martin Jan 1998

G98-1364 Feeding Children Ages 2 To 5, H. Darlene Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide defines nutritional needs and healthy eating patterns for children ages 2 to 5.

Children Grow at Their Own Rate

Children move though growth spurts throughout childhood. Usually, a child will grow about 2 1/2 inches and gain about four or five pounds each year between the ages of 2 and 5. By 15 months old, most children have developed enough fine motor skills to feed themselves without help, if allowed to do so. Appetites vary with young children as well as adults. Parents and caregivers need to help promote a healthy pattern of eating rather than using ...


Nf98-377 Kentucky Bluegrass Seed Production Management In Western Nebraska And Eastern Wyoming, Rebecca L. Harms, David D. Baltensperger, Robert C. Shearman, Dan Laursen, Roger Hammons, Tony Merrigan, Jim Krall, C. Dean Yonts Jan 1998

Nf98-377 Kentucky Bluegrass Seed Production Management In Western Nebraska And Eastern Wyoming, Rebecca L. Harms, David D. Baltensperger, Robert C. Shearman, Dan Laursen, Roger Hammons, Tony Merrigan, Jim Krall, C. Dean Yonts

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses management practicies related to Kentucky Bluegrass seed production.


G98-1777 Windbreak Renovation, James R. Brandle, Jon Wilson, Craig Stange, Mike Kuhns Jan 1998

G98-1777 Windbreak Renovation, James R. Brandle, Jon Wilson, Craig Stange, Mike Kuhns

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Windbreaks are an integral part of many farms and ranches and provide critical protection for farmsteads, livestock and crops. Unfortunately, many windbreaks planted in the 1930s and 1940s are losing their effectiveness due to age, poor health or neglect. In some cases, the windbreak no longer has the necessary density to provide winter protection. In other cases, overcrowding may have reduced the health and vigor of the windbreak, or the windbreak may have been invaded by aggressive sod-forming grasses such as smooth brome, reducing tree growth. Whatever the reason, many older windbreaks need renovation.


Nf98-374 Corn Blotch Leafminer, Robert J. Wright Jan 1998

Nf98-374 Corn Blotch Leafminer, Robert J. Wright

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact describes what is known about the biology of the Corn Blotch Leafminer, in preparation for the possibility of highter numbers in future years.


G98-1350 Basics Of Feeding Horses: What To Feed And Why, Kathleen P. Anderson Jan 1998

G98-1350 Basics Of Feeding Horses: What To Feed And Why, Kathleen P. Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the horse's digestive system and appropriate feeding procedures.

Because of the horse's eating habits and digestive system, feeding practices common to other species of livestock often result in severe digestive dysfunction or even death for the horse. In fact, several anatomical peculiarities of the horse's digestive tract predispose horses to digestive disorders such as colic and laminitis even under the best management. Under poor feeding management, the onset of these disorders is almost assured. The objective of feeding management is to provide a ration with balanced nutrition that both maximizes nutrient utilization while minimizing ...


G98-1343 Fall Vegetable Gardening, Dale T. Lindgren, Susan D. Schoneweis Jan 1998

G98-1343 Fall Vegetable Gardening, Dale T. Lindgren, Susan D. Schoneweis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the possibilities for and needs of a fall garden.

Though often overlooked by the gardener, planting vegetables in July and August for fall production is an excellent practice. Late plantings of cool- and warm-season vegetables can extend the harvest long after spring-planted crops have ceased production. Most cool-season vegetables grow as well as or better than those planted in the spring as they mature during shorter, cooler days. Flavors of vegetables maturing in the cool, crisp days of autumn are often sweeter and milder than those grown during hot summer weather. This is especially true for cole ...


Nf98-380 Where Am I Going To Find $2,000 To Save?, Kathy Prochaska-Cue Jan 1998

Nf98-380 Where Am I Going To Find $2,000 To Save?, Kathy Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact provides an estimation for retirement financial planning.


Nf98-385 Returning Crp Land To Crops: Grass Management/Cropping Suggestions For Land Released In Winter Or Early Spring, Charles A. Shapiro, Mari Lubberstedt, Lisa Lunz, William L. Kranz, Steven D. Rasmussen, David P. Shelton, Keith J. Jarvi, John F. Witkowski, Robert Frerichs, Ray Brentlinger, Pat Bathke, Terry Gompert, Alex Martin, Paul J. Jasa, Robert N. Klein Jan 1998

Nf98-385 Returning Crp Land To Crops: Grass Management/Cropping Suggestions For Land Released In Winter Or Early Spring, Charles A. Shapiro, Mari Lubberstedt, Lisa Lunz, William L. Kranz, Steven D. Rasmussen, David P. Shelton, Keith J. Jarvi, John F. Witkowski, Robert Frerichs, Ray Brentlinger, Pat Bathke, Terry Gompert, Alex Martin, Paul J. Jasa, Robert N. Klein

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact gives grass control and planting recommendations for producers who learn in January that their Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land applications have been denied and who wish to put the land into production the upcoming spring.


Nf98-383 Improve Communication For Better Understanding, Herbert G. Lingren Jan 1998

Nf98-383 Improve Communication For Better Understanding, Herbert G. Lingren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact offers some advice on family communication.


Nf98-388 How To Manage Daily Stress, Herbert G. Lingren Jan 1998

Nf98-388 How To Manage Daily Stress, Herbert G. Lingren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Purpose: To learn about stress and coping, and to develop a stress management plan..


Nf98-384 Making Relationships Work In Difficult Times, Herbert G. Lingren Jan 1998

Nf98-384 Making Relationships Work In Difficult Times, Herbert G. Lingren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact offers some advice to help guide couples in difficult situations.


Nf98-394 Blame: A Human Response To Threat, Herbert G. Lingren Jan 1998

Nf98-394 Blame: A Human Response To Threat, Herbert G. Lingren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact discusses the role of blame in relationships.


Nf98-361 The Female Athlete Triad, Linda S. Boeckner Jan 1998

Nf98-361 The Female Athlete Triad, Linda S. Boeckner

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

As more and more females become active in sports, physicians, coaches, trainers, parents and athletes need to be aware of a potential condition termed the Female Athlete Triad.


Nf98-363 Chemical Weed Control In Tree Planting Projects: Part Ii - Post-Emergence Herbicides, John Duplissis Jan 1998

Nf98-363 Chemical Weed Control In Tree Planting Projects: Part Ii - Post-Emergence Herbicides, John Duplissis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact examines weed control in tree planting projects.


Nf98-362 Chemical Weed Control In Tree Planting Projects: Part I - Pre-Emergence Herbicides, John Duplissis Jan 1998

Nf98-362 Chemical Weed Control In Tree Planting Projects: Part I - Pre-Emergence Herbicides, John Duplissis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact examines weed control in tree planting projects.


G98-1363 Container Gardening (Revised September 2004), Anne Streich, Kim Todd, Kelly Feehan Jan 1998

G98-1363 Container Gardening (Revised September 2004), Anne Streich, Kim Todd, Kelly Feehan

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Container gardening has many advantages. People with physical limitations may appreciate the ability to garden without bending over or kneeling. Container gardens can also bring the garden closer to one's home or outdoor living area, such as along a sidewalk that is accessible from a wheelchair. Container gardens can place culinary herbs close to the kitchen to be snipped and used in cooking. Container gardens on patios or decks give people with limited outdoor space, such as an apartment and townhome dwellers, the opportunity to enjoy plants.

Growing flowers, vegetables, and other plants in containers provides many gardening opportunities ...


Cc98-412 Money 2000+ Enrollment Goals, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1998

Cc98-412 Money 2000+ Enrollment Goals, Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Money 2000+ Enrollment Goals is a form used in the Money 2000+ program series to help the teaching personnel better understand your money situation. The information that is provided on the form in confidental and will be used for summary purposes only.

This enrollment form was adapted from material produced by Iowa State University.


Cc98-410 Money 2000+ News (Introductory Issue), Kathleen Prochaska-Cue Jan 1998

Cc98-410 Money 2000+ News (Introductory Issue), Kathleen Prochaska-Cue

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Money 2000+ is a program designed to increase the financial well being of Nebraskans through increased savings and reduced household debt. This Campaign Circular, Money 2000+ News is an introductory publication to this program which talks about setting goals for saving money, downsizing your debt with ways to save with credit cards, passing up things that waste money, record keeping, looking for ways to save money, avoiding late fees, and saving and credit tips.


G98-1373 Escherichica Coli Testing For Process Control Verification — Pork Carcass Sampling, Mindy Brashears, Dianne Peters Jan 1998

G98-1373 Escherichica Coli Testing For Process Control Verification — Pork Carcass Sampling, Mindy Brashears, Dianne Peters

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In July 1996, the USDA published the Final Rule on Pathogen Reduction for meat and poultry processing facilities. Its goal is to reduce the occurrence of food-borne pathogens in meat and poultry products. The rule requires carcass sampling for "generic" E. coli in meat and poultry slaughter operations. The USDA has developed guidelines for acceptable, marginal and unacceptable amounts of E. coli to be used by the processor to determine if their process is controlling microbial hazards. If E. coli testing indicates that the process is not in control of the microbial hazards, then the processors may have to make ...


Ec98-1876 Foliar And Fruit Diseases Of Cucurbits, Jane A. Christensen, Loren J. Giesler Jan 1998

Ec98-1876 Foliar And Fruit Diseases Of Cucurbits, Jane A. Christensen, Loren J. Giesler

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Members of the cucurbit family are well adapted to Nebraska's weather conditions and are grown in both gardens and commercial fields. Cucurbits include cucumbers, squash, melons, gourds, gherkin, vegetable marrow, and pumpkins. They are susceptible to varying degrees to diseases caused by fungi, bacteria and viruses. Accurate disease diagnosis is an essential part of crop management and can help growers attain maximum yields.

This extension circular explains these diseases of cucurbits and how to control them.


Ec98-149 Summer Annual Forages For The Nebraska Panhandle: Variety Tests, 1989-1992 And 1997, Burt Weichenthal, David D. Baltensperger, Patrick E. Reece Jan 1998

Ec98-149 Summer Annual Forages For The Nebraska Panhandle: Variety Tests, 1989-1992 And 1997, Burt Weichenthal, David D. Baltensperger, Patrick E. Reece

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Summer annual forage grasses can provide valuable forage as pasture, green chop, silage, and hay. With adequate soil moisture these forages grow very rapidly during warm summer months. Most varieties are relatively drought resistant because of efficient water use. It is important to select a type and variety most suitable to the system in which it is to used. Nebraska producers have relied primarily on six types of summer annual forage grasses to meet or supplement forage needs. This circular is a summary report of summer annual forage trials conduted in 1989-92 and 1997 to obtain forage production and quality ...


Ec98-148 Grassland Management With Prescribed Fire, John Ortmann, Daniel D. Beran, Robert A. Masters, James L. Stubbendieck Jan 1998

Ec98-148 Grassland Management With Prescribed Fire, John Ortmann, Daniel D. Beran, Robert A. Masters, James L. Stubbendieck

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular provides an overview of the use of fire in grassland management. It describes the history and importance of fire in the grassland ecosystem, how plants respond to fire, and the uses and potential benefits of prescribed fire. It also summarizes fire planning, and legal and safety considerations. And finally, it provides guidance on some special uses of fire.


G98-1376 Drinking Water: Fluoride (Revised February 2005), Sharon Skipton, Bruce I. Dvorak Jan 1998

G98-1376 Drinking Water: Fluoride (Revised February 2005), Sharon Skipton, Bruce I. Dvorak

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses fluoride in domestic water supplies. Fluoride, a naturally occurring element, exists in combination with other elements as a fluoride compound and is found as a constituent of minerals in rocks and soil. When water passes through and over the soil and rock formations containing fluoride it dissolves these compounds, resulting in the small amounts of soluble fluoride present in virtually all water sources.


Ec98-751 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 9: Improving Livestock Manure Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-751 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 9: Improving Livestock Manure Storage, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Manure storage is an important manure management option for livestock producers. Stored manure can be applied to the soil when nutrient uptake by crops can be maximized and weather related losses minimized. Preplant applications of manure incorporated into the soil ensures maximum crop nutrient value, while reducing risks of water contamination.


Ec98-757 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 11: Improving Land Application Of Manure, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-757 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Fact Sheet 11: Improving Land Application Of Manure, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Resource or waste? Stewardship of soil and water resources should be a goal of every livestock producer. Management decisions made relative to land application of livestock manure will influence the ability to attain that goal. An evaluation of your land application practices should focus on the following question: Is manure a waste or are source?


Ec98-756 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 13: Milking Center Effluent Treatment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-756 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Risk Worksheet 13: Milking Center Effluent Treatment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Why should I be concerned? Milking center effluent is usually considered a dairy sanitation problem. If not properly managed, however, the effluent can contaminate both groundwater and surface water.


Ec98-771 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Fact Sheet 8: Improving Household Wastewater Treatment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt Jan 1998

Ec98-771 Farm*A*Syst Nebraska’S System For Assessing Water Contamination Fact Sheet 8: Improving Household Wastewater Treatment, Robert Grisso, Delynn Hay, Paul J. Jasa, Richard K. Koelsch, Sharon Skipton, Wayne Woldt

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A properly installed and maintained system for treating and disposing of household wastewater will minimize the impact of that system on groundwater and surfacewater. State and local codes specify how wastewater systems must be designed, installed, and maintained. For example, Title 124 regulates the design, operation, and maintenance of septic tank systems in Nebraska. In addition, federal and state regulations guide the stabilization and land application of wastewater septage.