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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Ec82-1738 Tree Planting Guide, William R. Lovett, Bruce E. Bolander Jan 1982

Ec82-1738 Tree Planting Guide, William R. Lovett, Bruce E. Bolander

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Site Preparation

Proper site preparation is essential to your tree planting operation, and varies with the different climates and soil types.

Chemical Control: On sandy soils, rough terrain, or other highly erodible sites, tillage is not recommended. Chemical weed and/or grass killers may be applied to the site in the fall or before planting in the spring.

Summer Fallow: This practice is recommended on heavy soil in western Nebraska to conserve soil moisture. This may be accomplished with the aid of occasional disking, subsurface tillage, or chemicals to control weeds.

Fall Tillage: In the eastern areas of the state ...


G82-626 Air Properties: Temperature And Relative Humidity, David P. Shelton, Gerald R. Bodman Jan 1982

G82-626 Air Properties: Temperature And Relative Humidity, David P. Shelton, Gerald R. Bodman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes how to use a simplified psychrometric chart to better understand the relationships between air temperature and relative humidity.

Air is a vital component of our everyday lives. Air properties are important whether we are ventilating a livestock housing unit, drying grain, or determining relative humidity in the home. In a livestock building, temperature, moisture, odors, and toxic or noxious gases must be controlled. Since the moisture holding capacity of air increases with increasing temperature, heat may be added in grain drying to aid in removing moisture from the grain kernel. In the home, moisture can either be ...


Heg82-159 Wood Stoves: Location In The Home, Kathleen Parrott Jan 1982

Heg82-159 Wood Stoves: Location In The Home, Kathleen Parrott

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication outlines some factors that affect efficient location of a wood stove in the home. Shopping for a wood stove involves making many decisions--size, style and materials--to name a few. Before making the final selection, consider where the stove will be located. The stove's location affects the efficiency of its operation, distribution of heat, convenience, and most importantly, safety.


Heg82-158 Weatherizing Your Home--Weatherstripping, Kathleen Parrott Jan 1982

Heg82-158 Weatherizing Your Home--Weatherstripping, Kathleen Parrott

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This guide discusses the practice of weatherizing your home through weatherstripping. Selection of materials, types of weatherstripping and buying and installing these products are discussed. Insulation is not the whole story for energy conservation! Even if your home is well-insulated, energy may be wasted through air infiltration. Air can leak around doors and windows, foundations, chimneys, exterior plumbing, etc. In the winter, air heated by your furnace is lost to the outside; in summer, hot outdoor air puts an extra load on your air conditioner. If your home is typical, one-half to three-quarters of your fuel bill is the result ...


Heg82-167 Leadership Roles Group Members Play, Duane A. Olsen Jan 1982

Heg82-167 Leadership Roles Group Members Play, Duane A. Olsen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Although personal freedom, independence, and the opportunity to "do your own thing" are highly valued, group activities dominate our lives. People willingly, even eagerly, give up freedom and independence to join groups and organizations. Calendars are filled with the activities of religious groups, business or professional organizations, recreational teams, civic clubs and others.

Effective leadership is a key element in the success of all groups and organizations. Whether the title is president, director, or chair, progress is measured by the success of the group or organization.


G82-623 An Overview Of Concrete As A Building Material, David P. Shelton, James M. Harper Jan 1982

G82-623 An Overview Of Concrete As A Building Material, David P. Shelton, James M. Harper

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The general properties of concrete are discussed, as well as its components and their proportions. Includes decisions customers should consider before using concrete.

Concrete, specifically portland cement concrete, has the qualities of strength, durability, versatility, and economy, and can be placed or molded into virtually any shape and reproduce any surface texture. It is the most widely used construction material in the world. In the United States almost twice as much portland cement concrete is used as all other construction materials combined.


Cc82-306 When Your Income Decreases ... But The Bills Don't Jan 1982

Cc82-306 When Your Income Decreases ... But The Bills Don't

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This campaign circular reprinted with permission from the Cooperative Extension Service at the Ohio State University, discusses what to do when your income decreases and the bills do not. It discusses credit contracts; which creditors to pay first; how to talk to creditors; what to do with utility and phone companies, keeping a house over your head, making payments on cars and other vehicles, no more "charge it please!", making insurance premium payments and last chance efforts.


G82-621 Sources Of Livestock And Poultry Market Information (Revised July 1994), Allen Wellman Jan 1982

G82-621 Sources Of Livestock And Poultry Market Information (Revised July 1994), Allen Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides a list of various market information sources, each followed by a brief summary of issue schedules and contents.

It provides a listing of widely used and readily available market information sources that contain information which may be useful to agricultural producers, lenders and agribusiness firms when making livestock and poultry marketing decisions. Most of the available market information and statistical data comes from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Many now require an annual subscription fee.


G82-596 Use And Management Of Micronutrient Fertilizers In Nebraska, George W. Rehm, E.J. Penas Jan 1982

G82-596 Use And Management Of Micronutrient Fertilizers In Nebraska, George W. Rehm, E.J. Penas

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide focuses on the use of the micronutrients zinc and iron.

Of the 16 elements known to be essential for plant growth, 7 are used in very small amounts and are classified as micronutrients. These are zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), boron (B), molybdenum (Mo) and chlorine (Cl).

Micronutrients are supplied to plants from two sources: 1) soil minerals and 2) organic matter. They are released as the soil minerals break down over a period of time by weathering. The major portion of the micronutrients made available to plants, however, probably comes from the breakdown (mineralization ...


G82-587 Understanding Potassium For Crop Production In Nebraska, George W. Rehm Jan 1982

G82-587 Understanding Potassium For Crop Production In Nebraska, George W. Rehm

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the availability of and the need for potassium in Nebraska soils

Potassium (K) is an essential nutrient absorbed from soils by crops in relatively large amounts. Therefore, it is classified as a major nutrient. Although large amounts are absorbed, potassium is not necessarily needed in a fertilizer program. Numerous studies conducted with all major crops have definitely shown that adding potassium to a fertilizer program does not lead to yield increases on the large majority of soils in Nebraska.


G620 Pinkeye, Don Hudson, Duane N. Rice Jan 1982

G620 Pinkeye, Don Hudson, Duane N. Rice

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The signs and causes of pinkeye, a painful eye disease that is common in cattle, are covered, as well as control and treatment procedures.


G82-630 Concrete Construction: Obtaining Quality Results, David P. Shelton, James M. Harper Jan 1982

G82-630 Concrete Construction: Obtaining Quality Results, David P. Shelton, James M. Harper

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the prior planning, site preparation, forming, ordering, placing, finishing, jointing and curing needed for successful concrete construction projects, especially slabs or flatwork.

Concrete is an excellent construction material for many agricultural applications. By paying careful attention to some major considerations, quality concrete construction can be achieved. The result can be years of reliable service.


G82-618 Grapes: Cultivars, Training And Pruning, Don Steinegger Jan 1982

G82-618 Grapes: Cultivars, Training And Pruning, Don Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Planting and caring for grapes both are covered here.

Grapes have long been a favorite fruit of the home gardener. The earliest settlers in the New World found wild grapes thriving along streams and in timbered areas. These were mostly of the species Vites labrusca and V. riparia, while the wine and dessert grapes of the Old World are V. vinifera.


G82-590 Feeder Cattle Grades, Keith E. Gilster, H. Dwight Loveday Jan 1982

G82-590 Feeder Cattle Grades, Keith E. Gilster, H. Dwight Loveday

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes the ten USDA feeder cattle grades.

The purpose of the USDA Feeder Cattle Grades is to sort feeder cattle into similar groups that will facilitate their selling and buying. These grades can also be used for sorting feeder cattle into similar outcome groups in a feedlot. Differences in frame size and muscle thickness score are the basis for the USDA Feeder Cattle Grades.

Feeder cattle are given a grade score that is coded for both frame size (large, medium and small) and thickness (1, 2 and 3). For example, a large frame, thick feeder steer would have ...


G82-586 Effects Of Agricultural Runoff On Nebraska Water Quality, Elbert C. Dickey, Phillip Harlan, Don Vokal, C.J. Kisling-Crouch Jan 1982

G82-586 Effects Of Agricultural Runoff On Nebraska Water Quality, Elbert C. Dickey, Phillip Harlan, Don Vokal, C.J. Kisling-Crouch

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the effects of agricultural runoff on Nebraska water quality. Methods of controlling agricultural runoff are also examined.

The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 and the Clean Water Act of 1977 were written in response to a national concern for decreasing surface and groundwater quality. These laws set 1985 as a target date for eliminating pollutant discharges into navigable waters. An interim goal of the acts calls for "water quality which provides for the protection and propagation of fish, shell fish, and wildlife and provides for recreation in and on the water," where attainable, by ...


G82-601 Using Phosphorus Fertilizers Effectively, E.J. Penas, D.H. Sander Jan 1982

G82-601 Using Phosphorus Fertilizers Effectively, E.J. Penas, D.H. Sander

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

For most effective use of phosphorus, the fertilizer needs to be placed to ensure quick contact by growing roots and minimal contact with the soil.

Phosphorus (P) fertilizers are second only to nitrogen fertilizers in importance for growing crops in Nebraska. However, the principles affecting efficient phosphorus use are totally different. Nitrogen is a mobile nutrient both inside the plant and in the soil, while phosphorus moves very little in the soil. In addition, total plant phosphorus requirements are much lower than those of nitrogen. Plant leaves commonly contain ten times more nitrogen than phosphorus. However, phosphorus is concentrated in ...


G82-591 Bushel Rents For Nebraska Cropland, H. Douglas Jose Jan 1982

G82-591 Bushel Rents For Nebraska Cropland, H. Douglas Jose

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The purpose of this NebGuide is to help tenants and landowners assess bushel rents and to arrive at agreements which are economically sound and fair to both.

Crop share or cash rent arrangements have been used in most farm leases in Nebraska for many years. Recently, the bushel rent approach has gained favor in the state, especially with landowners. These rental arrangements are sometimes also called flexible cash rents or standing rents.

The purpose of this NebGuide is to help tenants and landowners assess bushel rents and to arrive at agreements which are economically sound and fair to both.


G82-600 Chimneys: Their Installation And Upkeep, Rollin D. Schnieder Jan 1982

G82-600 Chimneys: Their Installation And Upkeep, Rollin D. Schnieder

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Anyone who is thinking of putting in a wood stove has a lot of different things to consider. One of the most important is providing a good means for getting rid of combustion gases through some type of chimney. This may be a masonry chimney, some type of prefabricated chimney, or it may mean the repair of a chimney now on the house that may not have been used for many years.

All wood burning stoves need a tight, well-designed and properly constructed chimney to get rid of gases. This chimney must help in the efficient use of the stove ...


G82-622 Sources Of Grain Market Information, Allen C. Wellman Jan 1982

G82-622 Sources Of Grain Market Information, Allen C. Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A list of various market information sources, each followed by a brief summary of distribution schedules and contents.

This NebGuide lists widely used and readily available market information sources that contain information which may be useful to agricultural producers, lenders and agribusiness firms when making grain marketing decisions. Most of the available market information and statistical data comes from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Generally, there are two basic types of market information available to data users. The first type, Market News Service, is provided by the USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) and concerns daily prices used ...


Heg82-157 Weatherizing Your Home--Caulking, Kathleen Parrott Jan 1982

Heg82-157 Weatherizing Your Home--Caulking, Kathleen Parrott

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses caulking the home to reduce air infiltration and increase energy efficiency. Where to caulk, types of caulking materials, and techniques for caulking are presented. Is your home an energy waster? Even in a well-insulated home, energy can be wasted through air infiltration. One-third to one- half of a typical fuel bill is the result of air infiltration. Air leaks around doors and windows, foundations, chimneys, exterior plumbing, or other parts of the structure. In the winter, air heated by your furnace is lost to the outside; in summer, hot outdoor air puts an extra load on your ...


G82-603 Eggplant, Dale T. Lindgren Jan 1982

G82-603 Eggplant, Dale T. Lindgren

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

How to grow eggplants from transplants and seeds. Includes varietal descriptions, cultural practices, harvesting tips, and possible disease and insect problems.

The eggplant belongs to the Solanaceae or nightshade family, which includes the sweet pepper, tomato and potato. The ornamentals petunia and Jerusalem cherry, and other plants such as tobacco and horse nettle, are also members of this family.

Eggplant was so named because the first varieties introduced to English-speaking people had egg-shaped fruits. Its scientific name is Solanum melongena var. esculentum.


G82-602 Predicting The Last Irrigation For Corn, Grain Sorghum And Soybeans (Revised August 1991), Norman L. Klocke, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Terry L. Bockstadter Jan 1982

G82-602 Predicting The Last Irrigation For Corn, Grain Sorghum And Soybeans (Revised August 1991), Norman L. Klocke, Dean E. Eisenhauer, Terry L. Bockstadter

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide presents criteria and "rules of thumb" for predicting the last irrigation for corn, grain sorghum and soybeans.

Determining when to apply the last irrigation of the season is an important water management decision. One extra irrigation may mean wasting an additional one to three inches of water and two to five gallons of diesel fuel per acre. On the other hand, applying that one extra irrigation could mean several bushels per acre in crop yield.